Author Topic: What indoor system should I use for efficient boils of 12 gallons batches?  (Read 2173 times)

Offline ILoveStouts

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Hi,

I'm all new to homebrewing and I bought a 15 gallons induction-ready kettle from SS Brewing technologies.
I'm searching for a powerfull system (with which I could use BIAB if possible) to heat and boil my worts of 12 gallons. My kettle is 15,75 inches wide... I can't find any good heating system so far, all the induction plates/cooktops available are too small in diameter with at least 1,5 inches missing on both sides of the kettle if I would be heating with a 3500 Watts/240 volts!

What should i buy/use for heating system for indoor brewing? Would you recommend this: https://www.brewhardware.com/product_p/element5500.htm


What equipment/material do I need more if I would want to use this 5500 heating element? Do you know if I could adapt that element straight to my SS brewtech kettle of 15 gallons without having to make hole in it?And could I somehow integrate that element with a temperature controller? Any videos on how this works?

Many thanks in advance from the best and most passionate homebrewers in the world!

Thomas
From Finland

Offline reverseapachemaster

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Any electric system I have seen at that size required wiring the house for the appropriate voltage and drilling a hole into the brew kettle for the element. 
Heck yeah I blog about homebrewing: Brain Sparging on Brewing

Offline pete b

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Assuming that an induction burner is powerful enough, I wonder if a simple stand could be made to safely support the weight of the kettle but allow full contact with the burner surface?
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Offline Werks21

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Assuming that an induction burner is powerful enough, I wonder if a simple stand could be made to safely support the weight of the kettle but allow full contact with the burner surface?

One of the cool things about induction heat is that the vessel does not need to be in contact with the induction burner top. Burner is a bad name since the cook top produces no heat. The induction cooker generates pulsing magnetic fields that generated heat via electrical current/heat in the metal of the pot above it. So you can build a stand that holds the pot just above it if necessary. You can also  check weight ratings of the cookers and see if they are up to the task though that seems unlikely. I looked into induction for brewing a a while back and found batch size to be a major limiting factor with 10 gallons seeming to be a stretch so If you want to do 15 gallons you will likely need the biggest and baddest 120v induction "burner" you can find and a big ole standard 120v electric element in the pot ran to a outlet on the other side of your house/apartment. And if that doesn't work add another element to the pot and plug it in somewhere in the middle the two. This is not a intended to be a end all solution or advisement just to help understand limitations of electric/induction heating for 15 gallons. if 240V is an option for you the dialogue changes a bit.
Jonathan W.
Snohomish WA

Offline bengelbrau

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Don't forget to consider what to do with all the water that's going to get boiled off. I used to brew under the overhead door in my garage, but had to move the kettle to avoid condensation dripping from the door.

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The portable induction ranges will not cut it for a kettle that large.  The 240VAC portable induction range uses the same size hob ("induction burner") as the 120VAC portable induction range.  The hob on the portable induction range is less than 8 inches in diameter.

If you are dead set on going induction, you are looking at a 3-phase commercial stockpot induction range, which will set you back over $3,000.00US.

https://www.katom.com/084-MSP7000200.html


If you are open to immersion heating, you should check out www.theelectricbrewery.com for ideas and systems.

Offline morticaixavier

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Could you gang together several of the smaller induction elements to get the power you need or does induction not work that way? if each hob is 8" across I could fit two or three under my kettle if arranged correctly. Obviously I'd need more power to do this but it's an interesting idea.
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Offline Werks21

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Could you gang together several of the smaller induction elements to get the power you need or does induction not work that way? if each hob is 8" across I could fit two or three under my kettle if arranged correctly. Obviously I'd need more power to do this but it's an interesting idea.

Interesting indeed, I would bet that with the right diameter pot and compact but powerful elements it would work great. just a matter of running cords to different parts of the house to spread the load across different circuits.
Jonathan W.
Snohomish WA

Offline pete b

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Could you gang together several of the smaller induction elements to get the power you need or does induction not work that way? if each hob is 8" across I could fit two or three under my kettle if arranged correctly. Obviously I'd need more power to do this but it's an interesting idea.

Interesting indeed, I would bet that with the right diameter pot and compact but powerful elements it would work great. just a matter of running cords to different parts of the house to spread the load across different circuits.
That doesn't sound a heck of a lot safer than burning propane in your house. ???
Don't let the bastards cheer you up.

Offline Phil_M

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I'd also wonder how the EMFs from three seperate induction coils would interfere with each other. Can't say without doing the math, but that has the potential to lessen their power.
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

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Offline morticaixavier

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I'd also wonder how the EMFs from three seperate induction coils would interfere with each other. Can't say without doing the math, but that has the potential to lessen their power.

that's sort of what I was wondering about.
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Offline Werks21

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I'd also wonder how the EMFs from three seperate induction coils would interfere with each other. Can't say without doing the math, but that has the potential to lessen their power.

that's sort of what I was wondering about.

If dead spots are noticed where two units meet you could simply try another outlet until you find one the same phase as the adjacent unit (unless you have a phase checking device lying around) and then there should be no interference, and may actually produce a hotter spot where units meet. Interference on depends on phases being different, power of unit, and dead space between coil and housing. not sure there is any other way (short of being and electrical engineer) to know for certain other than just going for it.
Jonathan W.
Snohomish WA

Offline Phil_M

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If the impedance/inductance of the different elements is different, wouldn't that also cause a phase difference? Again, without sitting down and doing the math I can't say either way.

Not an electrical engineer, just an electrical engineering student.
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline Werks21

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If the impedance/inductance of the different elements is different, wouldn't that also cause a phase difference? Again, without sitting down and doing the math I can't say either way.

Not an electrical engineer, just an electrical engineering student.

well I cant speak to that for sure. I'm not an electrical engineering student, Just an aircraft mechanic. ;D
Jonathan W.
Snohomish WA

Offline Hooper

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To answer the original question...I'd go natural gas with a nice overhead hood...I don't know anyone who has had a gas stove and then went electric and was happy with electric...
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