Author Topic: Decoction  (Read 1633 times)

Offline denny

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Re: Decoction
« Reply #30 on: March 15, 2015, 04:15:23 PM »
I've been under the impression that decoction was a technique designed for mash temperature control in the days before the availability of accurate thermometers. Do you think it may add something to the beer beyond this? Or do you think it's just an interesting technique that's worth trying, but has been supplanted by Thermapens?

It was more for under modified malt with lower Diastatic Power, to get a lower pH with the acid rest, then take the wort up through the temperatures where the enzymes are most active several times to get conversion. The British were not doing decoctions at the same time with different malt.

I think it's because the 2 reasons are related.  Decoction was a method of temperature control used to mash undermodified malt.  The story is that brewers learned how much to pull to hit a certain temp step.  I'm not certain they had any idea what the temp was, only that it worked.
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Offline BrewBama

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Re: Decoction
« Reply #31 on: March 15, 2015, 08:36:53 PM »
I've been under the impression that decoction was a technique designed for mash temperature control in the days before the availability of accurate thermometers. Do you think it may add something to the beer beyond this? Or do you think it's just an interesting technique that's worth trying, but has been supplanted by Thermapens?

It was more for under modified malt with lower Diastatic Power, to get a lower pH with the acid rest, then take the wort up through the temperatures where the enzymes are most active several times to get conversion. The British were not doing decoctions at the same time with different malt.

I think it's because the 2 reasons are related.  Decoction was a method of temperature control used to mash undermodified malt.  The story is that brewers learned how much to pull to hit a certain temp step.  I'm not certain they had any idea what the temp was, only that it worked.
I agree I read that they used touch to figure out temp. Cool = less than 99*F. No temp felt = 99*F. Warm = 120*F ish. Hot = 150*F ish.
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Offline BrewBama

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Re: Decoction
« Reply #32 on: March 17, 2015, 12:31:45 AM »
TRY A STEP MASH INSTEAD , TRY STEPING THE DARK GRAINS AND ADDING AT THE END OF THE BOIL, AND IF YOU WANT THE BANANA AND CLOVE FLAVORS AVOID A YEAST STARTER , AND FERMENT AT THE HIGHER RANGE OF THE WEIHENSTEPHAN YEAST.
I am looking into this now.
Huntsville AL

Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Decoction
« Reply #33 on: March 18, 2015, 03:53:29 AM »
Give it a try.  I have noticed some flavor distinction with the decoction being slightly better in flavor.  I could be wrong and would like to be shown otherwise, if you think so.  It seemed like lately I have experienced some greater richness in terms of body and maltiness occurring with a decoction mash, even if a single decoction.  Again, I am willing to say otherwise if shown to be the case.  I do a lot of lagers from Helles to Dortmunder to German Pils to BoPils to CAP.  The decoction flavor profile and body seems improved over a step mash or single infusion.  This is purely anecdotal and without any blind triangle testing.  Just saying this to further the discussion.
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Offline brewerbrandon

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Re: Decoction
« Reply #34 on: March 28, 2015, 01:08:20 AM »
Give it a try.  I have noticed some flavor distinction with the decoction being slightly better in flavor.  I could be wrong and would like to be shown otherwise, if you think so.  It seemed like lately I have experienced some greater richness in terms of body and maltiness occurring with a decoction mash, even if a single decoction.  Again, I am willing to say otherwise if shown to be the case.  I do a lot of lagers from Helles to Dortmunder to German Pils to BoPils to CAP.  The decoction flavor profile and body seems improved over a step mash or single infusion.  This is purely anecdotal and without any blind triangle testing.  Just saying this to further the discussion.

I agree. I have noticed my decocted mashes have a slightly maltier profile. I also get better efficiency as compared to a step mash for the same recipe. Doesn't the decoction contribute the maillard reactions in the grain whilst boiling?