Author Topic: handling kegs not under pressure  (Read 1460 times)

Offline ScottBeh

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handling kegs not under pressure
« on: March 13, 2015, 11:13:57 PM »
a few months ago upgraded my cold storage to handle 10/12 cornys, but only have 2 leads coming off my tank, so I pressurize after filling the kegs, purge the headspace 5 or 6 long pulls, drop them into cold storage.  I'll keep the pressure on 2 of the ones I want to carb up.  Once the pressurized headspace co2 gets absorbed, what takes its place?  vacuum?  o2 pulled in from the lid?  The reason I ask is having an oxidation problem. Never had it before this. All transfers from kettle to glass are closed with forced co2 onto blanketed co2.   Co2 distribution banks (if that what they are called) are pretty pricy and I don't look forward to a dozen leads.  How about if I pressurize the stored ones with nitrogen instead, I have that already.

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: handling kegs not under pressure
« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2015, 12:45:05 AM »
It would be a PITA but you could jus ttop off the kegs not connected regularly so the headspace doesn't reach equilibrium with the atmosphere. even before the beer is fully carbed it will be carbed enough to hold positive pressure.
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Offline duboman

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Re: handling kegs not under pressure
« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2015, 02:21:30 AM »
If you're simply filling kegs and sitting on them to free a tap, why not just naturally carb in the keg?
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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: handling kegs not under pressure
« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2015, 03:13:49 AM »
If you're simply filling kegs and sitting on them to free a tap, why not just naturally carb in the keg?

an excellent suggestion!
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: handling kegs not under pressure
« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2015, 03:21:12 AM »
Some lids are fine once seated, others will let air in once the pressure drops. It takes some $, but you can put a manifold and distribution system in the keezer. Some call it the "octopus".
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Offline ScottBeh

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Re: handling kegs not under pressure
« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2015, 08:53:43 AM »
I was planning to hit them with co2 daily in the beginning, and I did for a bit but the PITA/lazy/forgot kicked in. 

Natural carbing the others should fix it.  How much beer do you lose to that process?  Probly less than 5 gallons, which is where I am at now

Hopefully solved the leaky lid problem.  Bought some .325 super compressible BunaN and glued up some orings.  The originals orings are .275.  Makes the bale really tight.

Offline duboman

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Re: handling kegs not under pressure
« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2015, 12:53:35 PM »
You don't lose any beer to natural carbing, its no different than priming when bottling. You just use half the amount of priming sugar you would if you were bottling.

The beer will simply carbonate in the keg and essentially be ready when you're set to put it in the kegerator assuming you let it sit at 70oF for 7-14 days.

You still purge the keg with co2 prior to racking the beer but the co2 created by priming will eliminate the oxidation issue in any headspace there may be.
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Offline rjharper

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Re: handling kegs not under pressure
« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2015, 03:48:07 PM »
If I'm filling a keg for later, I'll push it to 35-40 psi then disconnect.  Some of the co2 will dissolve, but there will be enough head pressure after equilibrium to hold the seal.

Offline ScottBeh

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Re: handling kegs not under pressure
« Reply #8 on: March 14, 2015, 03:50:06 PM »
Heard you have to cut your out tube short to miss the sediment?

Im a little hesitant at room temps after listening to Bamforth's interview.  Maybe without cause

Offline Jimmy K

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Re: handling kegs not under pressure
« Reply #9 on: March 14, 2015, 03:59:13 PM »
Heard you have to cut your out tube short to miss the sediment?

Im a little hesitant at room temps after listening to Bamforth's interview.  Maybe without cause
You can, or you can just accept that the first pint will be cloudy. It's not that big a deal.
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Offline ScottBeh

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Re: handling kegs not under pressure
« Reply #10 on: March 14, 2015, 05:12:23 PM »
Anybody thoughts on just putting them under nitrogen?

Offline Stevie

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Re: handling kegs not under pressure
« Reply #11 on: March 14, 2015, 05:31:45 PM »
Manifold is the simple solution. You can go cheap and use y's or t's as well

Offline Jimmy K

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Re: handling kegs not under pressure
« Reply #12 on: March 16, 2015, 04:58:44 PM »
You could use nitrogen. Or you could hit the keg with 30lbs CO2 for a few hours. Then disconnect and that keg will stay pressurized until you're ready to carbonate it. And like Steve said, you can get T-fittings pretty cheap and easily have 4 or more connections.
 
And to answer the question about CO2 in the headspace - eventually CO2 in the beer and headspace reach equilibrium, but some headspace CO2 will always remain and you won't have a vacuum.
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Offline ScottBeh

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Re: handling kegs not under pressure
« Reply #13 on: March 16, 2015, 08:13:56 PM »
Thanks guys. Going cheap with T's,  would there be a psi drop by the end of the line, and uneven carbonation?   if there is that problem I guess its fixed by shelling out the bucks for a real distribution system? 

Offline Stevie

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Re: handling kegs not under pressure
« Reply #14 on: March 16, 2015, 08:20:20 PM »
Thanks guys. Going cheap with T's,  would there be a psi drop by the end of the line, and uneven carbonation?   if there is that problem I guess its fixed by shelling out the bucks for a real distribution system?
There shouldn't be any difference. T's do have one major drawback. When hooking-up a keg that has been recently jostled, foam my rise up through the gas post and spread through the lines. The fix for this is to relieve the head pressure before connecting to the keg. Quality manifolds have the added benefit of check valves that help to prevent this backflow.