Author Topic: Brewing during the drought  (Read 4756 times)

Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: Brewing during the drought
« Reply #30 on: April 03, 2015, 02:38:11 PM »
One hopes that this is not a 30+ year drought that that Anasazi had. I have spent a few years of my life in the desert Southwest 2 or 3 weeks at a time, so many places have water can (maybe will) run out.

Last weekend I was in the LA area visiting some friends who live just north of LA near Palmdale. It's an arid climate out there but development is going up fast and bringing with it green lawns and small patches of localized farms. My immediate thought is that those developments are just not sustainable. Desert soil does not easily turn into lush green grass without a lot of help.
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Offline Stevie

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Re: Brewing during the drought
« Reply #31 on: April 03, 2015, 02:47:18 PM »
Last weekend I was in the LA area visiting some friends who live just north of LA near Palmdale. It's an arid climate out there but development is going up fast and bringing with it green lawns and small patches of localized farms. My immediate thought is that those developments are just not sustainable. Desert soil does not easily turn into lush green grass without a lot of help.
I'm all about zeroscaping or local planting the front yard. If a lawn requires watering outside of natural rain fall, it's a waste. Only use case, IMO, is kids and dogs. Even then, Ag use up 80% of the water according to recent numbers. Individual conservation is good, but it's only a small part of the solution.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Brewing during the drought
« Reply #32 on: April 03, 2015, 02:58:52 PM »
I think the DMS fear may be overblown. As mentioned, the Aussies love no-chill.

I also do not support the idea of saving wort for weeks or months. That just screams botulism to me.

+1
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Offline Pinski

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Re: Brewing during the drought
« Reply #33 on: April 03, 2015, 03:46:41 PM »
Practice the no chill method and ditch the quick chill thing all together- Im never going back.

Until you end up with a batch that reeks of creamed corn.  Slow/no chill will almost certainly result in increased DMS production.

The Ozzies swear otherwise. I've read a lot into the no-chill thing. I'm still a bit skeptical, but plenty of people are doing it.

From the above Maltose Falcons link:

Chill None: Our antipodal brewers are experiencing their own brutal droughts and brush fires currently. Naturally, Aussie brewers are heavily invested in reducing their water usage. One very popular technique amongst them is "No Chill Brewing". The basic process - get a heat resistant plastic vessel (Aussie's like their HDPE cubes) , carefully transfer freshly boiled wort into the sanitized vessel, squeeze out the remaining air, seal the cube, roll it around a few times to ensure even vessel heating (to avoid cracking) and wait. The wait is at least overnight until cool. Once chilled, rack the wort into your fermenter and pitch your yeast. Voila! Done! The Aussies swear you can make great beer via this method - including IPAs and APAs. The consensus from fellow Amurican brewers is to shift your hop additions around and allow for some last minute "flameout" to adjust the aroma.
Bob Stempski is the one I found out from. He has a video out on you tube and has done some shows on Basic brewing covering the topic. In one of the shows he shares how some people he knows will brew several batches in one day and shelf the wort for "months" until they want to pitch the yeast. While I would never see myself shelving wort for months the practice of pitching the next day doesn't scare me. I can say I love the time it saves on brew day and its one less thing I need to deal with. An added bonus is I bought extra screw on caps for the no chill containers and drilled and set an airlock in the spare cap so the next day I just pitch the yeast in and let her rip in the same container. I have not had any off flavor as a result of wort sitting for 24 hours. While I do love the brewing process any time I can simplify the process and save some time im all over it. To date I haven't found any flaws with this practice.

I suppose I could be overly cautious about the DMS issue, yet my paranoia is based on the only batch I've ever had to dump being a completely corn-balled Cream Ale. It had a really long (for me) chill time because I was cooling 25 gallons with "warm" summer tap water through a CFC.

I understand that pilsner malt based wort will have more DMS precursor. My general preference is to boil hard and chill as quickly and efficiently as possible.  For me, no-chill just seems like a long way from best practice from a general wort quality and food safety perspective. 

That said, it does seem like a clever solution for an area with a recently acute water supply shortage.  I'm curious how well the technique works for high percentage pils malt beers.

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Offline EHall

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Re: Brewing during the drought
« Reply #34 on: April 03, 2015, 06:49:20 PM »
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006UNHEZ0/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B006UNHEZ0&linkCode=as2&tag=httpyougotcom-20&linkId=IEFXPQSBNEAAB6FV


"Nestle Corporation is known for selling chocolate, advocating the privatization of clean water (should not be a human right), child slave labor in Africa, controlling a large portion of the food supply and multiple bottled water brands (which they are making a shocking killing off of). They acquired rights from the Department of Natural Resources in Michigan to pump water out of Michigan for 99 years for just under $70,000. That’s right, for under $70,000 US dollars they have rights to pump hundreds of thousands of gallons of water out of Michigan as well as many other states each and every single day. According to the documentary film “Flow: For Love Of Water” the company profits approximately 1.8 Million dollars per day from its water bottling plants.

This is happening in CA too. Its not all environmental, these companies (Nestle is not the only one) have paid for rights to pump not only ground water but also allowed to pump out the aquafers (deep water souces well below the ground water level)

Just know there is much more going on besides a 'drought'... and it ain't because of 'global warming'! and due to all the fracking going on in CA too... that ground water and below is getting contaminated too! How's yer beer taste now?!  :o
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Brewing during the drought
« Reply #35 on: April 03, 2015, 07:26:53 PM »
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006UNHEZ0/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B006UNHEZ0&linkCode=as2&tag=httpyougotcom-20&linkId=IEFXPQSBNEAAB6FV


"Nestle Corporation is known for selling chocolate, advocating the privatization of clean water (should not be a human right), child slave labor in Africa, controlling a large portion of the food supply and multiple bottled water brands (which they are making a shocking killing off of). They acquired rights from the Department of Natural Resources in Michigan to pump water out of Michigan for 99 years for just under $70,000. That’s right, for under $70,000 US dollars they have rights to pump hundreds of thousands of gallons of water out of Michigan as well as many other states each and every single day. According to the documentary film “Flow: For Love Of Water” the company profits approximately 1.8 Million dollars per day from its water bottling plants.

This is happening in CA too. Its not all environmental, these companies (Nestle is not the only one) have paid for rights to pump not only ground water but also allowed to pump out the aquafers (deep water souces well below the ground water level)

Just know there is much more going on besides a 'drought'... and it ain't because of 'global warming'! and due to all the fracking going on in CA too... that ground water and below is getting contaminated too! How's yer beer taste now?!  :o

Nestle has been in the news for years in MI.

This is the one that really ground my gears. We drove by the spill about 2 days later and wow, the smell just about overpowered one. It is tar sand oil from Canada, so a good part of it forms solids that sank to the bottom of Morrow lake on the Kalamazoo river.

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kalamazoo_River_oil_spill
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Offline Phil_M

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Re: Brewing during the drought
« Reply #36 on: April 03, 2015, 07:44:53 PM »
A few years ago I spent about a month in Palmdale for a business trip. As someone who lives on the east coast, I don't get why every shopping center in my area waters their grass nightly. Image my surprise when I go to the desert and find that watering lawns/medians/shopping center areas is about as common. I'm not saying it's wrong to want green grass…but it seemed strange to me trying to make the desert into something that it's not.

I was lucky enough to be out there when it rained, it was amazing how quickly the desert started to bloom.
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Brewing during the drought
« Reply #37 on: April 03, 2015, 10:38:49 PM »
A few years ago I spent about a month in Palmdale for a business trip. As someone who lives on the east coast, I don't get why every shopping center in my area waters their grass nightly. Image my surprise when I go to the desert and find that watering lawns/medians/shopping center areas is about as common. I'm not saying it's wrong to want green grass…but it seemed strange to me trying to make the desert into something that it's not.

I was lucky enough to be out there when it rained, it was amazing how quickly the desert started to bloom.

Desert plants evolved to take advantage of any excess moisture, It can be beautiful in the desert after a rainy spell. My friend in AZ just called that fuel for the fires in the dry season.
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Offline EHall

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Re: Brewing during the drought
« Reply #38 on: April 11, 2015, 07:11:35 PM »
http://www.naturalblaze.com/2015/04/activists-shut-down-nestle-plant-in.html

not sure if anyone knows this but the CEO of Nestle is on record for saying that water should not be a basic right... companies should own it and sell it back... I'm sure this event really pissed him off!
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Offline flbrewer

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Re: Brewing during the drought
« Reply #39 on: April 11, 2015, 09:12:37 PM »
For someone not in a drought area, can you explain how they enforce this?

Offline Rattlesnake44

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Re: Brewing during the drought
« Reply #40 on: April 12, 2015, 03:22:09 PM »

For someone not in a drought area, can you explain how they enforce this?
Different cities enforce it in many different ways, or not at all. They can track water usage through the water company, they mandate which days you can and can't water your lawn and will have city officials cite people they see watering on the off days.  And then some cities issue "advisories" and rely on the honor system of the public to conserve water.

Offline dbeechum

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Re: Brewing during the drought
« Reply #41 on: April 12, 2015, 03:28:34 PM »
And here in the LA area, a lot of cities have tiger enforcement teams that will drive around and cite those who have leaks and/or running their sprinklers. Etc, etc.
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Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: Brewing during the drought
« Reply #42 on: April 12, 2015, 04:12:39 PM »
For someone not in a drought area, can you explain how they enforce this?

Here in Fort Worth we have been on a lawn watering restriction year-round since 2013 (and during the summers in years prior) in which we can only use our sprinkler system on certain days and at certain times (not in the middle of the day) and then otherwise less restrictions for watering the foundation and gardens. Most of the enforcement is through voluntary reporting. I've never seen or heard of anybody getting a disciplinary notice from the city and I've never seen code enforcement rolling through during the day to find violators. We are only at level one of the drought restrictions so if we have to move up a level I expect there will be more efforts to enforce the restrictions.
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Offline EHall

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Re: Brewing during the drought
« Reply #43 on: April 13, 2015, 07:59:54 PM »
they also get your neighbors to tattle on you.
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Brewing during the drought
« Reply #44 on: April 13, 2015, 08:07:33 PM »
they also get your neighbors to tattle on you.
Isn't a green lawn on a street of brown lawns tattling on yourself?
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