Membership questions? Log in issues? Email info@brewersassociation.org

Author Topic: New all- grainer...Maybe  (Read 934 times)

Offline tankie

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 2
New all- grainer...Maybe
« on: April 09, 2015, 05:54:20 pm »
Hi all! I,m about to jump on the all-grain bandwagon after a few years of extract brewing......couple questions.... Whats a good overall grain mill setting and where can I get more specific info on malt conditioning?.....Thanks...Tank

Offline Stevie

  • Official Poobah of No Life. (I Got Ban Hammered by Drew)
  • *********
  • Posts: 6858
Re: New all- grainer...Maybe
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2015, 06:27:55 pm »
Braukaiser has info on malt conditioning. Mill setting is more try and adjust than "this works best."

Offline HoosierBrew

  • I must live here
  • **********
  • Posts: 13031
  • Indianapolis,IN
Re: New all- grainer...Maybe
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2015, 06:37:10 pm »
Mill setting is more try and adjust than "this works best."

+1
Jon H.

Offline tommymorris

  • Official Poobah of No Life. (I Got Ban Hammered by Drew)
  • *********
  • Posts: 3869
Re: New all- grainer...Maybe
« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2015, 08:55:42 pm »

Hi all! I,m about to jump on the all-grain bandwagon after a few years of extract brewing......couple questions.... Whats a good overall grain mill setting and where can I get more specific info on malt conditioning?.....Thanks...Tank
Go for it. I was a multi year extract brewer. Batch sparge and BIAB are both very easy. Fly sparge not too bad either. It takes 2-3 batches to get things figured out completely. My first couple of batches had low efficiency but they were still good beer.

I recommend picking early recipes that have room for error. Maybe 1055 OG target. If you end up at 1050 it's no big deal.

Offline euge

  • I must live here
  • **********
  • Posts: 8017
  • Ego ceruisam ad bibere cervisiam
Re: New all- grainer...Maybe
« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2015, 06:37:31 am »
You'll have to play with it to get the grist you want. Too wide and it is too coarse and too narrow of a gap produces much more flour and ruins the husk. That'll increase the likelihood of a stuck sparge or the need to slow the runoff down to avoid one, thus unnecessarily lengthening the brew-day. Too coarse also would lengthen the time needed in the mash to achieve conversion and perhaps reduce brewhouse efficiency.

The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Laws are spider-webs, which catch the little flies, but cannot hold the big ones. -Anacharsis