Author Topic: thin beer  (Read 2549 times)

Offline homoeccentricus

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Re: thin beer
« Reply #30 on: April 17, 2015, 03:49:18 PM »
Maybe, as UncleBrazzie suggests, this thinness is a problem more prominent in Belgian (and presumably German) beers?
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: thin beer
« Reply #31 on: April 17, 2015, 03:49:50 PM »
same reason why a low FG saison made correctly can make people think they are drinking a higher FG beer. low FG isn't one for one equated with body perception and mouthfeel.

For sure. Yeast strain (3711 comes to mind for saison) and grist, too.  I still would think in identical recipes the 10 pt lower FG would seem thinner.
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Offline Wort-H.O.G.

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Re: thin beer
« Reply #32 on: April 17, 2015, 03:51:49 PM »
same reason why a low FG saison made correctly can make people think they are drinking a higher FG beer. low FG isn't one for one equated with body perception and mouthfeel.

For sure. Yeast strain (3711 comes to mind for saison) and grist, too.  I still would think in identical recipes the 10 pt lower FG would seem thinner.

+1
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Offline denny

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Re: thin beer
« Reply #33 on: April 17, 2015, 04:24:35 PM »
It makes me wonder about using carapils. I've never seen the need for it in so many recipes, but a lot of breweries do seem to use it still - maybe it is a way after all to have a beer finish at, say 1.006-1.008, be drinkable, but still have nice body.

That's what I discovered working on the Am. mild.  Mash temp made little to no difference, but heavy doses of carapils and crystal did.
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Offline euge

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Re: thin beer
« Reply #34 on: April 17, 2015, 04:25:04 PM »
I'm been chasing the same phantom as Denny. The Belgian beers that inspire me have this quality, whereas many  of their counterparts are too syrupy and cloyingly sweet. Many British ales have the body I'm looking for. I never would have thought to consider any beer out of Germany "thin"...

Perhaps it has something to do with the mineral content in combination with proper fermentation.

To me it's a lightness in body with out being weak in flavor. Sort of a fluffy silky soft mouthfeel.
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Offline denny

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Re: thin beer
« Reply #35 on: April 17, 2015, 04:25:41 PM »
same reason why a low FG saison made correctly can make people think they are drinking a higher FG beer. low FG isn't one for one equated with body perception and mouthfeel.

For sure. Yeast strain (3711 comes to mind for saison) and grist, too.  I still would think in identical recipes the 10 pt lower FG would seem thinner.

+1

Yeah, we'd all think that, but this experiment seems to indicate differently.  I look forward to trying it myself.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: thin beer
« Reply #36 on: April 17, 2015, 04:35:44 PM »
same reason why a low FG saison made correctly can make people think they are drinking a higher FG beer. low FG isn't one for one equated with body perception and mouthfeel.

For sure. Yeast strain (3711 comes to mind for saison) and grist, too.  I still would think in identical recipes the 10 pt lower FG would seem thinner.

+1

Yeah, we'd all think that, but this experiment seems to indicate differently.  I look forward to trying it myself.

Me too.
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Offline Frankenbrew

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Re: thin beer
« Reply #37 on: April 17, 2015, 09:18:46 PM »
I prefer "insipid" to "flavorless" because it really puts a twist to the knife of my critique. :)

Nice! Good word choice.
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Offline dannyjed

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Re: thin beer
« Reply #38 on: April 17, 2015, 10:50:54 PM »
That's funny, I've noticed just the opposite.  New brewers (at least ones I've sampled beers from) , especially ones that start as extract/steeping grains brewers, often have overly sweet , underattenuated beers due to the lower fermentability of many extracts. And making things worse, a lot of them use way, way too much crystal. But to answer your question, to build body in an AG beer, a higher mash temp (154-160F) along with use of wheat, rye, or flaked barley would help, as would choosing a less attenuative yeast strain.  As for being flavorless, that's a recipe issue. Gotta experiment with malts and hops.
I agree with this +1. I even had this problem with some of my early, extract brews.
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Offline klickitat jim

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Re: thin beer
« Reply #39 on: April 17, 2015, 11:09:32 PM »
According to several studies it is a well known fact that I think too much body and sweetness would be more common with new brewers, with a magin of error of 100%. My first beers had so much body they had to be beaten into the glass with a night stick, and had not only too much flavor but too many flavors as well. Chewy as a neoprene glove and many similar odors and flavors.

You can achieve this by using LME, no sugar, and steep the snot out of about 5 lbs of crystal per 5 gallons. Then have no idea what sanitation is.

I've conquered that, but now I almost need to start going the other way with some of my beers. Some of my sours are a tad thin. I guess its not essy to have a 1.003 FG and have some body left.
« Last Edit: April 17, 2015, 11:12:04 PM by klickitat jim »

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: thin beer
« Reply #40 on: April 17, 2015, 11:14:44 PM »
My first beers had so much body they had to be beaten into the glass with a night stick,

OMG that's funny. I resemble that, Jim. I'm pretty sure a few of my first beers could be poured on pancakes if I got to try them now.   ;D
Jon H.

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: thin beer
« Reply #41 on: April 17, 2015, 11:43:57 PM »
My first beers had so much body they had to be beaten into the glass with a night stick,

OMG that's funny. I resemble that, Jim. I'm pretty sure a few of my first beers could be poured on pancakes if I got to try them now.   ;D
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