Author Topic: Under Pressure: The Impact of High(er) PSI Fermentations | exBEERiment Results!  (Read 962 times)

Offline brulosopher

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 505
  • They who drink beer will think beer
    • View Profile
    • Brülosophy
Brü Crew member Greg Foster was interested in the impact higher pressure fermentations had on beer, particularly in terms of hop character. He performed a cool xBmt to test it out, the results are in!

http://brulosophy.com/2015/04/27/under-pressure-the-impact-of-higher-psi-fermentations-exbeeriment-results-2/

Offline AmandaK

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1850
  • Redbird Brewhouse
    • View Profile
Very good write up by Greg. Keep 'em coming Marshall!
Amanda Burkemper
KC Bier Meisters Education Director
BJCP Assistant Education Director
BJCP Master/Mead

Redbird Brewhouse - There's Always a Project
Our Homebrewed Wedding, AHA Article

Offline HoosierBrew

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 13030
  • Indianapolis,IN
    • View Profile
Interesting. Nice job.
Jon H.

Offline brulosopher

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 505
  • They who drink beer will think beer
    • View Profile
    • Brülosophy
Very good write up by Greg. Keep 'em coming Marshall!

Thanks, Amanda! I thought this was a really interesting topic that I haven't seen much about in terms of homebrewing. I'm most curious about how pressurized fermentation impacts lager fermentation, which means I'll likely be building a spunding valve fairly soon :)

Offline AmandaK

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1850
  • Redbird Brewhouse
    • View Profile
Very good write up by Greg. Keep 'em coming Marshall!

Thanks, Amanda! I thought this was a really interesting topic that I haven't seen much about in terms of homebrewing. I'm most curious about how pressurized fermentation impacts lager fermentation, which means I'll likely be building a spunding valve fairly soon :)
That would be an interesting follow up to the fast lager method you use.

I've been doing the fast lager ferment (although a bit slower) at home with great results. It's not that I need more beers on tap faster, it's just nice to know that I can.
Amanda Burkemper
KC Bier Meisters Education Director
BJCP Assistant Education Director
BJCP Master/Mead

Redbird Brewhouse - There's Always a Project
Our Homebrewed Wedding, AHA Article

Offline brulosopher

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 505
  • They who drink beer will think beer
    • View Profile
    • Brülosophy
Very good write up by Greg. Keep 'em coming Marshall!

Thanks, Amanda! I thought this was a really interesting topic that I haven't seen much about in terms of homebrewing. I'm most curious about how pressurized fermentation impacts lager fermentation, which means I'll likely be building a spunding valve fairly soon :)
That would be an interesting follow up to the fast lager method you use.

I've been doing the fast lager ferment (although a bit slower) at home with great results. It's not that I need more beers on tap faster, it's just nice to know that I can.

I'm actually rather flexible on my times when it comes to lager fermentation-- I just started ramping temps on a BoPils that's been sitting at 50˚F for the last week. It'll still likely be ready by 3-4 weeks, though. I end up blowing through beer pretty quickly dues to taking growlers with me everywhere I go to collect xBmt data.

Offline hopfenundmalz

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 8845
  • Milford, MI
    • View Profile
Good read. As to regards to Bell's, on a tour of Bell's they said they ferment pretty hot, how hot was not mentioned. Their house yeast gives an orangey aroma, and I wonder if that is accentuated with higher temps. They also ferment dry hopped beers in 400 bbl fermenters, and others can be in 400 or 800 bbl fermenters.

A local brewery used to use Ayinger's strain before White Labs offered it, but switched to the high pressure lager yeast to minimize tank time. So many of the folks around Ann Arbor know this.
http://www.whitelabs.com/yeast/wlp925-hp-lager-yeast

There are still production breweries that use open fermentation, and many of the Franconian lager breweries use open fermentation. Maybe tradition, or maybe better tasting beer? As I have many fermenters, I am not usually in a big hurry (my fermentations go pretty fast).


Jeff Rankert
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
AHA Governing Committee
BJCP National
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 19395
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
Very good write up by Greg. Keep 'em coming Marshall!

Thanks, Amanda! I thought this was a really interesting topic that I haven't seen much about in terms of homebrewing. I'm most curious about how pressurized fermentation impacts lager fermentation, which means I'll likely be building a spunding valve fairly soon :)

Just so happens there are instructions for one on pg. 66 of Experimental Homebrewing!
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline brulosopher

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 505
  • They who drink beer will think beer
    • View Profile
    • Brülosophy

Very good write up by Greg. Keep 'em coming Marshall!

Thanks, Amanda! I thought this was a really interesting topic that I haven't seen much about in terms of homebrewing. I'm most curious about how pressurized fermentation impacts lager fermentation, which means I'll likely be building a spunding valve fairly soon :)

Just so happens there are instructions for one on pg. 66 of Experimental Homebrewing!

I've got it bookmarked!

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 19395
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
BTW, as I said on your website, I think the exbeeriment perfectly demonstrated why so few breweries ferment under pressure.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline brulosopher

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 505
  • They who drink beer will think beer
    • View Profile
    • Brülosophy
BTW, as I said on your website, I think the exbeeriment perfectly demonstrated why so few breweries ferment under pressure.

For sure, at least intentional added pressure. I am really curious if the pressure created by the huge volumes of beer is really the reason commercial brewers can run warmer ferm temps... or if our thinking about ferm temps is just a bit askew.

Offline hopfenundmalz

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 8845
  • Milford, MI
    • View Profile
BTW, as I said on your website, I think the exbeeriment perfectly demonstrated why so few breweries ferment under pressure.

For sure, at least intentional added pressure. I am really curious if the pressure created by the huge volumes of beer is really the reason commercial brewers can run warmer ferm temps... or if our thinking about ferm temps is just a bit askew.

Then again, what is the temperature in a big tank? At the 2011 NHC Terence Sullivan said Sierra Nevada had a multiple probe array made and put into a 800 bbl fermenter. They saw about 8 degrees F difference from bottom to top.
Jeff Rankert
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
AHA Governing Committee
BJCP National
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline klickitat jim

  • I must live here
  • **********
  • Posts: 8460
    • View Profile
BTW, as I said on your website, I think the exbeeriment perfectly demonstrated why so few breweries ferment under pressure.

For sure, at least intentional added pressure. I am really curious if the pressure created by the huge volumes of beer is really the reason commercial brewers can run warmer ferm temps... or if our thinking about ferm temps is just a bit askew.

Then again, what is the temperature in a big tank? At the 2011 NHC Terence Sullivan said Sierra Nevada had a multiple probe array made and put into a 800 bbl fermenter. They saw about 8 degrees F difference from bottom to top.
Which direction was warmer? Since heat rises, you'd think the top would be warmer. If its the other way around then something is going on.

Offline brulosopher

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 505
  • They who drink beer will think beer
    • View Profile
    • Brülosophy

BTW, as I said on your website, I think the exbeeriment perfectly demonstrated why so few breweries ferment under pressure.

For sure, at least intentional added pressure. I am really curious if the pressure created by the huge volumes of beer is really the reason commercial brewers can run warmer ferm temps... or if our thinking about ferm temps is just a bit askew.

Then again, what is the temperature in a big tank? At the 2011 NHC Terence Sullivan said Sierra Nevada had a multiple probe array made and put into a 800 bbl fermenter. They saw about 8 degrees F difference from bottom to top.
Which direction was warmer? Since heat rises, you'd think the top would be warmer. If its the other way around then something is going on.

My understanding is that the bottom is actually warmer because of the pressure... but as I am often, I could totally be wrong.