Author Topic: What's for dinner?  (Read 7630 times)

Offline capozzoli

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Re: What's for dinner?
« Reply #60 on: November 22, 2009, 10:16:02 AM »
I fire up some hot coals for the red peppers or my long Italian hots.

I know what you mean though. Also you cant add wine a deglaze with a little flame. Just for show I know, but I miss it.

Funny what Lonnie Mac said about lump coal cause next house Im going to build a wood burning stove that has a cook top, a built in oven for bread and pizza, and a sort of hanger to hang a pot for gulash or stew. Also a place to set the dutch oven with coals on top.

I would like to get that exact range pictured above too, but not sure I will be able to afford it...maybe.



Beer, its whats for dinner.

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Re: What's for dinner?
« Reply #61 on: November 22, 2009, 03:53:27 PM »
You crock pot haters can go ahead and hate. I agree they are not ideal for everything - but for roast beef they work great. But, I'm willing to learn. What would be a better way to cook a roast beef? Or, would you simply cook something else?
Keith Y.

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Offline dhacker

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Re: What's for dinner?
« Reply #62 on: November 22, 2009, 04:19:58 PM »
Tonight?

A big bowl of popcorn and a couple Schlafly Dry Irish Stouts.  :D
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Offline bluesman

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Re: What's for dinner?
« Reply #63 on: November 22, 2009, 04:38:18 PM »
You crock pot haters can go ahead and hate. I agree they are not ideal for everything - but for roast beef they work great. But, I'm willing to learn. What would be a better way to cook a roast beef? Or, would you simply cook something else?

+1

Honestly...I love a nice Beef Roast sauteed in some bacon drippings first...yeah that's right I said bacon drippings. Then assemle the seared beef with some onions, mushrooms, carrots and potatoes...and don't forget the garlic...
some fresh herbs and some beef broth to simmer with...some salt and pepper...maybe some chili powder...I said maybe.

in a Crock Pot...low and slow for about 6 to 8 hrs.

Now that's good eatin'  8)

You know the old saying..."there's more than one way to skin a cat"  ;D





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Offline tubercle

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Re: What's for dinner?
« Reply #64 on: November 22, 2009, 05:15:42 PM »
Just don't forget to take the drippin's and make some gravy ;D
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Offline roffenburger

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Re: What's for dinner?
« Reply #65 on: November 22, 2009, 05:35:45 PM »
Oklahoma Joe's BBQ. Quite possibly the best you can get!
:-X :-X :-X
Not a fan, Nic?
Oh, it was alright, and I've no great intention to set alight the raging fires of the BBQ WARS, but OK Joes did not impress me...I would have found it not so bad except for the wealth of praise and adulation heaped upon it by some Kansan relatives.  The ribs I had were OK, the fries were sodium delivery sticks (I like a salty fry, but holy crap, those things were desicating my insides!), and the sauces (tried the normal and the spicy) just weren't my favorite...beans weren't my style either.  The place was packed and it took us an hour to get served...again, it was more the vast discrepancy between reputation/expectations, and the actual food that struck me.  Personally I'm an LC's kinda guy, which is right down the road from me, and Gates sauce is my favorite.  Also like Jack Stack.  My first job was at a small BBQ place in east KC that is no longer there, but they had awesome beans and sausage.  But that's the great thing about BBQ, everybody has different favorites...I don't mean to be too negative, anybody serving smoked meats gets respect from me...man, criticizing somebody's favorite BBQ place feels like insulting their momma or something, no offense man!  In fairness they aren't the bottom of the barrel in KC BBQ by any stretch.  I just thought it was weird how widespread love for OK Joes is...maybe its a Kansan thing (I'm MO side)?

Not offended at all! I look forward to OK Joes, though the wait and the crowding factor does suck a bit. Maybe it is a Kansas thing ;). I have heard really really good things about LC's, but haven't been there yet. Do they serve you on butcher paper? My brother in law specifically asked for a place where they serve you on butcher paper when he was here. I never knew where LC's was until my wife and I just happened to drive by it one day (we don't make it to that area often). It was closed.
I love me some Jack Stack too!
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Offline maxieboy

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Re: What's for dinner?
« Reply #66 on: November 22, 2009, 06:00:50 PM »
You crock pot haters can go ahead and hate. I agree they are not ideal for everything - but for roast beef they work great. But, I'm willing to learn. What would be a better way to cook a roast beef? Or, would you simply cook something else?

+1

Honestly...I love a nice Beef Roast sauteed in some bacon drippings first...yeah that's right I said bacon drippings. Then assemle the seared beef with some onions, mushrooms, carrots and potatoes...and don't forget the garlic...
some fresh herbs and some beef broth to simmer with...some salt and pepper...maybe some chili powder...I said maybe.

in a Crock Pot...low and slow for about 6 to 8 hrs.

Now that's good eatin'  8)

You know the old saying..."there's more than one way to skin a cat"  ;D






  Funny, just finished chowing on pot roast, onions, potatos, and carrots done in...a crock pot. Brown off a nicely marbled, seasoned chuck roast and in she goes with the veggies, a few cloves of garlic, a couple bay leaves, and some red wine or stock. A nice green salad to go with. Old fashioned, simple Sunday fare.
 Excellent way to go for meals after a long day being active in the cold outdoors when all you want to do is have a beer, relax, and eat. It's just one tool in the arsenal...
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Offline bonjour

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Re: What's for dinner?
« Reply #67 on: November 22, 2009, 09:31:03 PM »
I'd rather do the roast low and slow on a smoker, but crock pot pot roast is awesome.  Works well for cornbeef as well.

Fred
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: What's for dinner?
« Reply #68 on: November 23, 2009, 03:44:48 PM »
Here is a good roast beef recipe. If you are into slow cooking , great cause this one takes about a week.

This is the type of dish you would get in a class A beef house. The kind of place that serves dry aged beef.

Pick a decent cut of beef, one that suits the amount of people. I prefer doing this with a rib roast cut from the butcher.This cut is basically prime rib. But you could use just about any cut of beef. Talk to the butcher where you buy the beef even if it is at the grocery store. Ask them if they can give you something really fresh. Tell them you are going to dry age it.

Then get a set of about six sturdy dish towels. You don't want them to fray and come apart.  When you get home launder if they are new, Take three of the towels and lay them out on the counter. Rub the beef with some kosher salt. Place the beef on the center of the towels and wrap the beef. Put the wrapped beef into a roasting dish. This is because the meat will loose a lot of moister and you don't want it leaking every where. Let this sit in the fridge for a day or three till the towels become soaked with blood. Take the towels off and set out the other three clean towel. wrap the beef again and, put it back in the pan into the fridge, launder the bloody towels.  repeat this for a week to ten days. You will extract a lot of the moister and the meat will become more dense. The natural enzymes within the meat will also start to break it down.

When ready to prepare the roast beef. unwrap it from the towels and cut away the first 1/8" - 1/4" of the surface of the meat.
This is one of the reasons dry aged beef is so expensive. You are taking away a lot of moisture then you are also cutting some away,  not to mention the price of handling the beef for the aging time. You can get aged beef at the Reading Terminal Market for about $30 per LB.  :o

Anyways you will have it like above for far less.

After you have trimmed the aged beef, get a large enough lidded roaster pan for the meat and a few other ingredients. Place the meat in the center of the pan. Around it place some onion wedges, whole clipped garlic, fresh rosemary, bay leaf, red wine (preferably burgundy) salt and fresh cracked pepper. Top with a few pats of butter and cover the roaster pan with the lid, or foil.. Put it into a preheated oven at 400 degrees. Let this roast till you get it just under your target temperature. (using a meat thermometer). Then uncover it for the last third of the cooking time. Baste it frequently and cook till you reach your desired internal temp. I,E. rare to well done.

You can also put potatoes and carrots or something in with the beef as well. Best to roast that stuff with the meat.

As far as gravy goes, Ill post my recipe for a burgundy beef demiglaze with green pepper corns latter, basically its a beef oxtail stock that is reduced by half, enriched with wine and thickened slightly with a roux. oh and we have to get a recipe for Yorkshire pudding going too. 

Yorkshire puddings are a little tough. Somebody had a few tricks back in the old country, was it nic? I remember somebody was turning them out. Oh man are they good for sopping up the demiglaze. 
Beer, its whats for dinner.

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Offline nicneufeld

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Re: What's for dinner?
« Reply #69 on: November 23, 2009, 04:51:08 PM »
Not me!  I'm terrible at Yorkshire pudding.  Love good British food, but lack the skill and experience to churn out a good YP.

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Re: What's for dinner?
« Reply #70 on: November 23, 2009, 08:55:08 PM »
Here is a good roast beef recipe. If you are into slow cooking , great cause this one takes about a week.

This is the type of dish you would get in a class A beef house. The kind of place that serves dry aged beef.

And to think you were b****in' about a 3 dollar cut of meat cooked with 7 dollars worth of electricity! I'll stick with my crock pot.  ;)
Keith Y.

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Offline capozzoli

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Re: What's for dinner?
« Reply #71 on: November 24, 2009, 05:40:33 AM »
One could make beer into whiskey with a crock pot. If one was so inclined.

http://www.scribd.com/doc/8260150/The-TwoDollar-Crockpot-Still

coarse one would have age it in oak for five or ten years.
Beer, its whats for dinner.

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Offline wilypig

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Re: What's for dinner?
« Reply #72 on: November 24, 2009, 07:39:58 AM »
Thanksgiving menu

Roast Turkey
Succotash
Palak Paneer (Punjabi cheese and greens)

Mashed Potato
Saffron Rice
Traditional stuffing
Stove top stuffing

Green Bean Casserole
Squash with Cranberry
Aloo Gobi (Punjabi Cauliflower and Potato)

Corn muffins and bread
Dinner rolls
Roti (Indian unleavened bread)

Cranberry sauce canned and fresh
Gravy

The guest list includes a Hindi family
If you can make mac and cheese from a box, you can make great beer.
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Offline Thirsty_Monk

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Re: What's for dinner?
« Reply #73 on: November 24, 2009, 08:33:34 AM »
One could make beer into whiskey with a crock pot. If one was so inclined.

No, no, no. Grandma never used crock pot.
It was pressure cooker.
I never understood what that copper tubing was for.
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Offline bluesman

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Re: What's for dinner?
« Reply #74 on: November 24, 2009, 08:54:34 AM »
One could make beer into whiskey with a crock pot. If one was so inclined.

No, no, no. Grandma never used crock pot.
It was pressure cooker.
I never understood what that copper tubing was for.

My family made shine back in the prohibition era...maybe another thread should be started...but anyway I remember seeing the copper tubing too. My Great grandparents used to hustle it in Wilmington, DE...specifically in the Polish community called Hedgeville. It was a hot seller. You couldn't make it fast enough.

 

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