Author Topic: Lack of CO2 in bottles after bottle conditioning.  (Read 861 times)

Offline HydraulicSammich

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Lack of CO2 in bottles after bottle conditioning.
« on: May 23, 2010, 01:24:24 PM »
I am experiencing no bubbles in 2 week in bottle conditioned IPA.  Origionally, it fermented for 5 days and then racked and dry hopped for an additional 7 days then racked a second time and conditioned for another week.  This was following a recipe.  No infection.  Somewhat sweet to the taste.  8.5 ABV.  My question, can I add Safale S-04 to each bottle and recap and if so, approximately how much yeast per bottle?  Any info would be appreciated. 
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Offline bonjour

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Re: Lack of CO2 in bottles after bottle conditioning.
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2010, 01:39:12 PM »
You should have enough yeast to carbonate your beer, the bigger question is do you have the sugar. 
You did not mention adding sugar at bottling.   Is this an ahh sh** moment or what did you do at bottling?

Fred
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Offline HydraulicSammich

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Re: Lack of CO2 in bottles after bottle conditioning.
« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2010, 01:44:51 PM »
Thanks,  Fred

Yes, I added 1 cup of sugar at bottling.  It tastes remarkably good and sweet.  Have you ever added additional yeast?  Or, do you have any other suggestions?
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Offline tom

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Re: Lack of CO2 in bottles after bottle conditioning.
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2010, 03:03:48 PM »
You shouldn't need extra yeast. What kind of bottles and what temperature are they?
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Offline HydraulicSammich

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Re: Lack of CO2 in bottles after bottle conditioning.
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2010, 03:12:06 PM »
Hey, thanks!

The bottles are 12 oz long necks and the room temp is 68.  I have bottle conditioned 12 brews since Dec in this room, all parameters being the same.  This brew has narry a bubble, not one.
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Re: Lack of CO2 in bottles after bottle conditioning.
« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2010, 03:20:12 PM »
As the others have said, you shouldn't have to add yeast. You may try moving them to a warmer location for a few more days, even another week or two. But, you may speed things up a little by picking a pack of dry yeast and clipping the corner and adding a few grains of yeast to each bottle and recapping, if all else fails. If that doesn;t work then my guess is you somehow forgot the priming sugar, and in that case you will need carb  drops.
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Offline bonjour

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Re: Lack of CO2 in bottles after bottle conditioning.
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2010, 03:27:38 PM »
Also possible is that you had insufficient mixing of your carbonation sugar and you have only sampled bottles from one end of your bottling batch.  If you know which bottles were first and which were last try the other end.

There is no downside to adding additional yeast, only from opening all the bottles letting air in and possibly contaminants.
You should have enough yeast present.  I have added yeast when I have conditioned a big beer (1.120+) for months prior to bottling.  You shouldn't have to.

This is a sugar problem, not sure of how or why, but it is a sugar problem, not a yeast problem, unless you sorbated the yeast, not a common procedure in brewing beer.

Fred
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Offline HydraulicSammich

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Re: Lack of CO2 in bottles after bottle conditioning.
« Reply #7 on: May 23, 2010, 03:51:17 PM »
Gentlemen,

I very much appreciate your willingness to assist me.  Most of you concur there is a sugar problem.  However, my notes indicate 1 cup of corn sugar was added and well stirred.  So, I suppose I will add yeast and carb tabs.  Would there be a down side to this if there was enough yeast already in it?  Thanks a million.

Lee
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Offline hokerer

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Re: Lack of CO2 in bottles after bottle conditioning.
« Reply #8 on: May 23, 2010, 05:04:15 PM »
Gentlemen,

I very much appreciate your willingness to assist me.  Most of you concur there is a sugar problem.  However, my notes indicate 1 cup of corn sugar was added and well stirred.  So, I suppose I will add yeast and carb tabs.  Would there be a down side to this if there was enough yeast already in it?  Thanks a million.

Lee

Too much yeast won't be a problem but the sugar could be.  If you really did put in the priming sugar like your notes indicate, adding more sugar could give you bottle bombs.  Maybe try just a carb drop in one bottle and see what happens.
Joe

Offline mainebrewer

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Re: Lack of CO2 in bottles after bottle conditioning.
« Reply #9 on: May 24, 2010, 03:01:50 PM »
When I was bottling, occaisionally the yeast would drop out of suspension to soon to finish carbing the beer.
So, after a couple of episodes of this, I started, after a few days, inverting the bottles, giving them a gentle shake, and putting them back in the box.
As suggested earlier, you can experiment with a couple of bottles by opening and inserting a carb tab and waiting another week to see what happens.
I would resuspend the yeast, put the bottles where it is 70-75 degrees and wait a week.
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