Author Topic: Spontaneous fermentation  (Read 786 times)

Offline hophead636

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Spontaneous fermentation
« on: May 13, 2015, 04:14:14 PM »
So I had some extra wort left over on my Sunday sour brew day big batch got gigas fast souring lacto and will be finished with 001 and possible a dry hop of simcoe and cascade not sure will decide after samples

But I had left over from that and decided to toss in some hallo oranges we have for the kid, I cut 3 up tossed half in around 110 degrees and threw the other half in around 75.  She's fermenting away beautifully, my questions are:

1)should I rack off the fruit or will it be fine on the fruit for awhile?
2) any tips for a first time spontaneous brewer that might help the process


Pics of said spontaneous fermentation

This was a day after:


This is two days after


Any help knowledge is welcome thanks in advance.  Hoppy brewing

Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: Spontaneous fermentation
« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2015, 03:18:58 PM »
Personally I would pull the fruit out unless you're trying to get some of the orange flavor and citric acid into the beer. Whatever bacteria and yeast were on the fruit are already in the beer.
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Offline hophead636

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Re: Spontaneous fermentation
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2015, 03:05:54 AM »
I'll pull it over the weekend and transfer to another gallon jug wanted some
Of the Orange flavor and acidity but not overwhelming

Offline troybinso

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Re: Spontaneous fermentation
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2015, 03:34:17 AM »
I'm not sure I would be too confident about whatever bugs have found their way on to grocery store oranges. Just imagine the places they have been before they made it to your beer. I guess it doesn't hurt to try to ferment with them, but I would be sure to test that the pH has dropped as well as the gravity before I put it in my mouth.

Offline erockrph

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Re: Spontaneous fermentation
« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2015, 03:42:28 AM »
I'm not sure I would be too confident about whatever bugs have found their way on to grocery store oranges. Just imagine the places they have been before they made it to your beer. I guess it doesn't hurt to try to ferment with them, but I would be sure to test that the pH has dropped as well as the gravity before I put it in my mouth.
Yeah, if I were trying to grow up a culture and it wasn't from my own fruit, I'd probably look for organic produce - preferably something from a local farmer's market. Most grocery store fruit has been treated/waxed/etc.

Still, if the pH and gravity drops, it smells OK, and there's no visible mold, then go for it. In all likelihood you're probably growing up bugs that collected on the fruit from your local flora, rather than something that made its way from the orchard. The oranges probably dropped the pH a bit to inhibit the nasties as well.
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Offline hophead636

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Re: Spontaneous fermentation
« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2015, 10:50:15 AM »
Wasn't going to taste till after test lol I thought about that just had them on hand and extra wort so said why not lol

Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: Spontaneous fermentation
« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2015, 02:59:47 PM »
I'm not sure I would be too confident about whatever bugs have found their way on to grocery store oranges. Just imagine the places they have been before they made it to your beer. I guess it doesn't hurt to try to ferment with them, but I would be sure to test that the pH has dropped as well as the gravity before I put it in my mouth.

On the other hand, just imagine the places they have been before they made it to your beer!

I once attempted to culture yeast off a peach I bought at the grocery store. I have no idea where it was grown but it wasn't local. The beer turned out very mediocre. I saved some of the slurry in a mason jar in the fridge. A couple years later I was pairing down my stock of yeast and discovered the mason jar. I figured I wouldn't brew with it again and dumped it. Only after dumping did I smell the jar and discover how stupid I had been. The smell was a glorious blend of brett funk and lactic acid. I was so disappointed that I had lost that culture. So I definitely think good yeast and LAB can be pulled from grocery store fruit even if the fruit's passengers are international in origin. Probably not coming from ISIS or al Qaeda.
Heck yeah I blog about homebrewing: Brain Sparging on Brewing