Author Topic: Vermont IPA Yeast, what next?  (Read 2834 times)

Offline wsoublo

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Vermont IPA Yeast, what next?
« on: May 19, 2015, 12:23:04 AM »
Just transferred an IPA fermented with Gigayeast Vermont IPA strain to a crony, so now I'm trying to figure out what to brew this weekend.  I was thinking an American Barleywine or maybe an American Stout.  Anyone have any other ideas or experiences with using the Conan strain in any other beer styles?

Online brewday

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Re: Vermont IPA Yeast, what next?
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2015, 12:32:52 AM »
El Jefe (The Alchemist) from Mitch's IPA book is outstanding.  English malts, all Simcoe hops, dark and delicious.
Jon Weaver

Offline quattlebaum

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Re: Vermont IPA Yeast, what next?
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2015, 02:58:52 AM »
Why not another IPA? :) trust me this will make your tongue slap your brains out.

Style: American IPA
TYPE: All Grain
Taste: (30.0)

Recipe Specifications
--------------------------
Boil Size: 5.42 gal
Post Boil Volume: 4.42 gal
Batch Size (fermenter): 3.75 gal   
Bottling Volume: 3.50 gal
Estimated OG: 1.060 SG
Estimated Color: 3.8 SRM
Estimated IBU: 67.8 IBUs
Brewhouse Efficiency: 73.00 %
Est Mash Efficiency: 82.7 %
Boil Time: 60 Minutes

Ingredients:
------------
Amt                   Name                                     Type          #        %/IBU         
6 lbs 10.4 oz         Pale Malt (2 Row) US (2.0 SRM)           Grain         1        79.7 %       
13.5 oz               Oats, Flaked (Briess) (1.4 SRM)          Grain         2        10.1 %       
13.5 oz               White Wheat Malt (2.4 SRM)               Grain         3        10.1 %       
0.20 oz               Columbus (Tomahawk) [15.20 %] - First Wo Hop           4        15.3 IBUs     
0.94 oz               Amarillo Gold [8.00 %] - Boil 5.0 min    Hop           5        6.9 IBUs     
0.94 oz               Citra [14.50 %] - Boil 5.0 min           Hop           6        12.4 IBUs     
1.00 oz               Amarillo Gold [8.00 %] - Steep/Whirlpool Hop           7        14.1 IBUs     
0.75 oz               Citra [14.50 %] - Steep/Whirlpool  30.0  Hop           8        19.1 IBUs     
1.0 pkg               Vermont IPA (GigaYeast #Gy054)           Yeast         9        -             
1.50 oz               Amarillo Gold [8.00 %] - Dry Hop 5.0 Day Hop           10       0.0 IBUs     
1.50 oz               Citra [14.50 %] - Dry Hop 5.0 Days       Hop           11       0.0 IBUs     
0.50 oz               Simcoe [12.20 %] - Dry Hop 5.0 Days      Hop           12       0.0 IBUs     


Mash Schedule: (208) Single Infusion, Medium Body, No Mash Out, Fly
Total Grain Weight: 8 lbs 5.5 oz
----------------------------
Name              Description                             Step Temperat Step Time     
Mash In           Add 3.65 gal of water at 162.1 F        150.0 F       60 min       

Sparge: Fly sparge with 2.77 gal water at 168.0 F
Notes:
------
 WP x 30min

Created with BeerSmith 2 - http://www.beersmith.com

BurghBeezer

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Re: Vermont IPA Yeast, what next?
« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2015, 01:09:29 AM »
Just transferred an IPA fermented with Gigayeast Vermont IPA strain to a crony, so now I'm trying to figure out what to brew this weekend...

Well since you transferred this IPA to a "crony" why not brew an IPA for yourself?   :D

Quattlebaum's recipe looks great.

Offline braufessor

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Re: Vermont IPA Yeast, what next?
« Reply #4 on: May 25, 2015, 02:05:02 PM »
Just transferred an IPA fermented with Gigayeast Vermont IPA strain to a crony, so now I'm trying to figure out what to brew this weekend.  I was thinking an American Barleywine or maybe an American Stout.  Anyone have any other ideas or experiences with using the Conan strain in any other beer styles?

I have been using yeast harvested from Heady Topper cans in a series of APA experiments over the past several months.  I have also been curious about using it in various styles as sort of a "house yeast."  Been too busy with school year finishing up, but now that we are done it is #1 on my brewing agenda to kick off the summer.  All my fermenters are empty and I have 4 x pint jars of conan harvested from my most recent pale ales.  Going to brew 4 batches this week with it to see how it works in various styles:
*APA
*Blonde Ale
*American Amber
*Porter

Figured those 4 would be an interesting mix to have on tap and also would be a decent test of its versatility.  Plus, I have some fairly "tried and true" recipes for all 4 beers where I will be able to identify how much I like the yeast in each one compared to yeasts I normally use for them.

Offline wsoublo

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Re: Vermont IPA Yeast, what next?
« Reply #5 on: May 26, 2015, 12:07:22 AM »
I have been using yeast harvested from Heady Topper cans in a series of APA experiments over the past several months.  I have also been curious about using it in various styles as sort of a "house yeast."  Been too busy with school year finishing up, but now that we are done it is #1 on my brewing agenda to kick off the summer.  All my fermenters are empty and I have 4 x pint jars of conan harvested from my most recent pale ales.  Going to brew 4 batches this week with it to see how it works in various styles:
*APA
*Blonde Ale
*American Amber
*Porter

Let me know how they turn out. 

I ended up brewing 11 gallons of Saison split with Belle Saison and Wyeast 3724.  I tried the open ferment on the Dupont strain based on some recommendations that I read, but it still stalled after 48 hours at 1.032 as usual, so the open ferment did not help with attenuation.  I will never use this strain again.  The Belle Saison is a work horse and is still chugging away.  I ended up pitching some dregs from a Cuvee De Tomme in the Wyeast 3724.

Offline Black Sands Brewery & Supply

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Re: Vermont IPA Yeast, what next?
« Reply #6 on: May 31, 2015, 09:19:53 PM »
I have been using yeast harvested from Heady Topper cans in a series of APA experiments over the past several months.  I have also been curious about using it in various styles as sort of a "house yeast."  Been too busy with school year finishing up, but now that we are done it is #1 on my brewing agenda to kick off the summer.  All my fermenters are empty and I have 4 x pint jars of conan harvested from my most recent pale ales.  Going to brew 4 batches this week with it to see how it works in various styles:
*APA
*Blonde Ale
*American Amber
*Porter

Let me know how they turn out. 

I ended up brewing 11 gallons of Saison split with Belle Saison and Wyeast 3724.  I tried the open ferment on the Dupont strain based on some recommendations that I read, but it still stalled after 48 hours at 1.032 as usual, so the open ferment did not help with attenuation.  I will never use this strain again.  The Belle Saison is a work horse and is still chugging away.  I ended up pitching some dregs from a Cuvee De Tomme in the Wyeast 3724.

3711 french all day "errry day"
Free recipes available for download on our website www.blacksandsbeer.com

Offline brewinhard

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Re: Vermont IPA Yeast, what next?
« Reply #7 on: May 31, 2015, 09:30:21 PM »
I have been using yeast harvested from Heady Topper cans in a series of APA experiments over the past several months.  I have also been curious about using it in various styles as sort of a "house yeast."  Been too busy with school year finishing up, but now that we are done it is #1 on my brewing agenda to kick off the summer.  All my fermenters are empty and I have 4 x pint jars of conan harvested from my most recent pale ales.  Going to brew 4 batches this week with it to see how it works in various styles:
*APA
*Blonde Ale
*American Amber
*Porter

Let me know how they turn out. 

I ended up brewing 11 gallons of Saison split with Belle Saison and Wyeast 3724.  I tried the open ferment on the Dupont strain based on some recommendations that I read, but it still stalled after 48 hours at 1.032 as usual, so the open ferment did not help with attenuation.  I will never use this strain again.  The Belle Saison is a work horse and is still chugging away.  I ended up pitching some dregs from a Cuvee De Tomme in the Wyeast 3724.

3724 will keep fermenting slowly provided you can keep the temps (non fluctuating) in the 80-90F range.  You can also try swirling to rouse the yeast in addition to the raised temps.  I have found that the first pitch with this strain can take up to about 5-6 wks sometimes with successive generations repitched performing more normally (i.e. 2-3 wks time).

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Vermont IPA Yeast, what next?
« Reply #8 on: May 31, 2015, 09:52:07 PM »
3724 will keep fermenting slowly provided you can keep the temps (non fluctuating) in the 80-90F range.  You can also try swirling to rouse the yeast in addition to the raised temps.  I have found that the first pitch with this strain can take up to about 5-6 wks sometimes with successive generations repitched performing more normally (i.e. 2-3 wks time).

+1.  I understand people's frustrations with 3724. I just hate to see people throw in the towel completely on what is (along with 565) by far the best saison strain IMO. Love its earthy character. I do like 3711 a lot, just don't love it.
Jon H.

Offline BrodyR

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Re: Vermont IPA Yeast, what next?
« Reply #9 on: June 01, 2015, 03:27:37 PM »
Why not another IPA? :) trust me this will make your tongue slap your brains out.

Style: American IPA
TYPE: All Grain
Taste: (30.0)

Recipe Specifications
--------------------------
Boil Size: 5.42 gal
Post Boil Volume: 4.42 gal
Batch Size (fermenter): 3.75 gal   
Bottling Volume: 3.50 gal
Estimated OG: 1.060 SG
Estimated Color: 3.8 SRM
Estimated IBU: 67.8 IBUs
Brewhouse Efficiency: 73.00 %
Est Mash Efficiency: 82.7 %
Boil Time: 60 Minutes

Ingredients:
------------
Amt                   Name                                     Type          #        %/IBU         
6 lbs 10.4 oz         Pale Malt (2 Row) US (2.0 SRM)           Grain         1        79.7 %       
13.5 oz               Oats, Flaked (Briess) (1.4 SRM)          Grain         2        10.1 %       
13.5 oz               White Wheat Malt (2.4 SRM)               Grain         3        10.1 %       
0.20 oz               Columbus (Tomahawk) [15.20 %] - First Wo Hop           4        15.3 IBUs     
0.94 oz               Amarillo Gold [8.00 %] - Boil 5.0 min    Hop           5        6.9 IBUs     
0.94 oz               Citra [14.50 %] - Boil 5.0 min           Hop           6        12.4 IBUs     
1.00 oz               Amarillo Gold [8.00 %] - Steep/Whirlpool Hop           7        14.1 IBUs     
0.75 oz               Citra [14.50 %] - Steep/Whirlpool  30.0  Hop           8        19.1 IBUs     
1.0 pkg               Vermont IPA (GigaYeast #Gy054)           Yeast         9        -             
1.50 oz               Amarillo Gold [8.00 %] - Dry Hop 5.0 Day Hop           10       0.0 IBUs     
1.50 oz               Citra [14.50 %] - Dry Hop 5.0 Days       Hop           11       0.0 IBUs     
0.50 oz               Simcoe [12.20 %] - Dry Hop 5.0 Days      Hop           12       0.0 IBUs     


Mash Schedule: (208) Single Infusion, Medium Body, No Mash Out, Fly
Total Grain Weight: 8 lbs 5.5 oz
----------------------------
Name              Description                             Step Temperat Step Time     
Mash In           Add 3.65 gal of water at 162.1 F        150.0 F       60 min       

Sparge: Fly sparge with 2.77 gal water at 168.0 F
Notes:
------
 WP x 30min

Created with BeerSmith 2 - http://www.beersmith.com

Hell yea, flaked oats + white wheat and no Crystal is my favorite IPA grain bill. Around me Tired Hands and 2nd Story use similar combos and achieve that Vermont style.

Offline braufessor

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Re: Vermont IPA Yeast, what next?
« Reply #10 on: June 07, 2015, 07:14:34 PM »
Well, I have been filling the fermenters and testing this yeast out as a "house yeast."  6 beers down, 1 to go for sure.... any other suggestions?

*Blonde - Kegged and Carbing
*Porter - Kegged and Carbing
*IPA - Fermenting for a week
*West Coast style Amber - Fermenting for a few days
*DIPA - brewed yesterday
*APA - brewed today
*British Dark Mild - later this week

I was pretty pleased with the Blonde and porter out of the fermenter - be interesting to see how they are in a week or two when carbed.  I already know it is a good yeast for APA/IPA/DIPA type beers.  Curious how it does in the British Dark Mild.  Not sure what else to try it on.... Most other beers I brew are lagers.  Suppose I could try it on an ordinary bitter or something like that as well.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Vermont IPA Yeast, what next?
« Reply #11 on: June 07, 2015, 07:22:20 PM »
Well, I have been filling the fermenters and testing this yeast out as a "house yeast."  6 beers down, 1 to go for sure.... any other suggestions?

*Blonde - Kegged and Carbing
*Porter - Kegged and Carbing
*IPA - Fermenting for a week
*West Coast style Amber - Fermenting for a few days
*DIPA - brewed yesterday
*APA - brewed today
*British Dark Mild - later this week

I was pretty pleased with the Blonde and porter out of the fermenter - be interesting to see how they are in a week or two when carbed.  I already know it is a good yeast for APA/IPA/DIPA type beers.  Curious how it does in the British Dark Mild.  Not sure what else to try it on.... Most other beers I brew are lagers.  Suppose I could try it on an ordinary bitter or something like that as well.

I look forward to seeing your impressions on all these beers. With the blonde ale being a clean style is there an apparent fruitiness from the yeast ? I know that it apparently has British origins. Just trying to ballpark how fruity it might be, though obviously temp is a big factor. And which company's yeast is this, by the way ?  I need to use this strain soon.
Jon H.

Offline brewinhard

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Re: Vermont IPA Yeast, what next?
« Reply #12 on: June 07, 2015, 07:22:52 PM »
American Stout? American Brown Ale?

Offline braufessor

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Re: Vermont IPA Yeast, what next?
« Reply #13 on: June 07, 2015, 07:49:44 PM »


I look forward to seeing your impressions on all these beers. With the blonde ale being a clean style is there an apparent fruitiness from the yeast ? I know that it apparently has British origins. Just trying to ballpark how fruity it might be, though obviously temp is a big factor. And which company's yeast is this, by the way ?  I need to use this strain soon.

The IPA is Gigayeast.  The porter was a multiple generation repitch that I built up from heady topper last November.  The blonde was a fresh batch of yeast I built up from heady topper (figured it would be a good beer to generate a bunch of additional yeast).  I harvested 8 half pint jars of yeast from the blonde and used them in the amber, DIPA, APA and will use in the dark mild too.

There is some fruitiness in the blonde.  However, to be honest, the "purpose" of the blonde ale is really only to serve as a low alcohol beer that appeals to the BMC crowd that shows up at my house.  Or, to be used as a "lawnmower" beer for me on hot days.  I think the "fruitiness" would probably be picked up as a competition beer.  However, as a "drinker" - it hits the spot pretty nicely.

I did not adjust temps really on any of these.  I chill to 58-60.  Pitch.  Basement is cool (60-62).  Fermentation takes the temp gradually to 66-68 over 4-5 days.  As soon as I see the temp stall and fall a degree, I take fermenters upstairs to ambient temp of 68-70 to let them finish.  Keg around day 12-14 for the most part.

I thought about stout and brown..... but, as it is summer, I will have enough trouble getting through the porter and dark mild.  I figure if it can brew a porter and a mild it should be able to brew a brown and a stout.... but I will wait till fall for those.

If they all turn out decent and if it seems worth sampling, and if anyone is interested in swapping some beer, I would be happy to send a mixed 6-8 pack of them in a month. 

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Vermont IPA Yeast, what next?
« Reply #14 on: June 07, 2015, 07:57:13 PM »


I look forward to seeing your impressions on all these beers. With the blonde ale being a clean style is there an apparent fruitiness from the yeast ? I know that it apparently has British origins. Just trying to ballpark how fruity it might be, though obviously temp is a big factor. And which company's yeast is this, by the way ?  I need to use this strain soon.

The IPA is Gigayeast.  The porter was a multiple generation repitch that I built up from heady topper last November.  The blonde was a fresh batch of yeast I built up from heady topper (figured it would be a good beer to generate a bunch of additional yeast).  I harvested 8 half pint jars of yeast from the blonde and used them in the amber, DIPA, APA and will use in the dark mild too.

There is some fruitiness in the blonde.  However, to be honest, the "purpose" of the blonde ale is really only to serve as a low alcohol beer that appeals to the BMC crowd that shows up at my house.  Or, to be used as a "lawnmower" beer for me on hot days.  I think the "fruitiness" would probably be picked up as a competition beer.  However, as a "drinker" - it hits the spot pretty nicely.

I did not adjust temps really on any of these.  I chill to 58-60.  Pitch.  Basement is cool (60-62).  Fermentation takes the temp gradually to 66-68 over 4-5 days.  As soon as I see the temp stall and fall a degree, I take fermenters upstairs to ambient temp of 68-70 to let them finish.  Keg around day 12-14 for the most part.

I thought about stout and brown..... but, as it is summer, I will have enough trouble getting through the porter and dark mild.  I figure if it can brew a porter and a mild it should be able to brew a brown and a stout.... but I will wait till fall for those.

If they all turn out decent and if it seems worth sampling, and if anyone is interested in swapping some beer, I would be happy to send a mixed 6-8 pack of them in a month. 

Cool, I'm sure the blonde ale is good. I just saw it as a beer where you could really eval the yeast. If it's not going to comp it doesn't matter anyway. And I just put a cream ale on tap - my own version of 'lawnmower' beer. Good on a hot day ! I definitely want to try an IPA with that yeast.
Jon H.