Author Topic: Nottingham dry yeast  (Read 1225 times)

Offline bierview

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Nottingham dry yeast
« on: May 22, 2015, 12:49:32 PM »
Only used this yeast in my bottling bucket for high gravity Belgians. Never used this in my primary fermentor.  Any recipe ideas?

Thanks

BV

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Re: Nottingham dry yeast
« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2015, 01:13:13 PM »
It is very clean, some say even cleaner than US-05, and it ferments cool all the way down to 55 F if you want it really clean.  At 70 F it still makes a good clean beer with few esters (slight peach/apricot).  Treat it just like American ale yeast US-05/WLP001/1056.  In the long distant past, at some point I was told that Nottingham ale yeast might have even been the biological ancestor of all the American ale yeasts US-05/WLP001/1056.  It's almost the same, but maybe even better, maybe.  There's good reason it's still around after so many years -- it's just a versatile yeast, acceptable for probably 80% of all beer styles.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2015, 01:15:35 PM by dmtaylor »
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Offline theDarkSide

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Re: Nottingham dry yeast
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2015, 01:36:49 PM »
It's my go to yeast for all my ciders.
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Re: Nottingham dry yeast
« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2015, 01:42:31 PM »
My cider I made this fall with Notty yeast turned out very peachy, to the point where I don't even really care to drink it unfortunately.  In a plain-jane cider, there's nothing for off-flavors to hide behind.  However, I LOVE how my US-05 cider turned out, very very clean.  I will be using US-05 for cider a lot more in future. </tangent>

In most beer, there's plenty of malt and hop character to meld with Notty's esters and provide "complexity".  :)
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Offline theDarkSide

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Re: Nottingham dry yeast
« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2015, 02:39:59 PM »
My cider I made this fall with Notty yeast turned out very peachy, to the point where I don't even really care to drink it unfortunately.  In a plain-jane cider, there's nothing for off-flavors to hide behind.  However, I LOVE how my US-05 cider turned out, very very clean.  I will be using US-05 for cider a lot more in future. </tangent>

What temp were you at?  I had mine in the basement around 65-70F and I don't pick up any of those flavors. 
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Offline erockrph

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Re: Nottingham dry yeast
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2015, 02:50:39 PM »
My cider I made this fall with Notty yeast turned out very peachy, to the point where I don't even really care to drink it unfortunately.  In a plain-jane cider, there's nothing for off-flavors to hide behind.  However, I LOVE how my US-05 cider turned out, very very clean.  I will be using US-05 for cider a lot more in future. </tangent>

What temp were you at?  I had mine in the basement around 65-70F and I don't pick up any of those flavors.
Did either of you add nutrients? Some yeasts aren't too happy in low-nutrient cider must. I know it makes a huge difference in sulfur production for me, and I wonder if it affects ester formation as well.
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Re: Nottingham dry yeast
« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2015, 02:54:30 PM »
I don't use nutrients for my ciders anymore at all.  Theories aside, I've seen no actual advantages to using it based on taste.  I do often get sulfur with pretty much any yeast, but it always disappears within a few weeks so I don't worry about that.  If memory serves, my fermentation temperature was somewhere in the 60s, until I purposely wanted to slow it down to retain sweetness, then it was in the refrigerator for a couple of months in the low 40s for it to clear.  I used the same process with US-05 as I did for Notty and got two completely different ciders.  Yes, I too was very surprised.  In the past I have had great success with US-05.  I believe this was the first cider I ever made with Notty, although I've used it for beer dozens of times and always liked it in beer.  If the esters came out due to lack of nutrients, maybe that answers that.  I haven't used it enough in cider to know for sure.  Might be worth experimentation, especially if you don't think you'd mind peach esters in your cider.  Some might, me, I don't really care for it.  It's not bad, it's just noticeably peachy.  Also some pineapple maybe.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2015, 02:57:54 PM by dmtaylor »
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Offline denny

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Re: Nottingham dry yeast
« Reply #7 on: May 22, 2015, 03:55:32 PM »
I don't find Notty clean at all.  To me, it's tart, bready, and estery.
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Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Nottingham dry yeast
« Reply #8 on: May 22, 2015, 04:53:59 PM »
I don't find Notty clean at all.  To me, it's tart, bready, and estery.

100% my experience.  I get weird tart flavors from it that I don't like at all.

However, if you pitch it with Windsor I think it's fantastic.  Can't explain that, but I've experienced it.

I've only had one beer in the past 5+ years that I pitched with Notty that didn't come out tart and that was a big old ale that aged for about a year, so maybe some of the tartness and esters aged out.
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Offline Steve Ruch

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Re: Nottingham dry yeast
« Reply #9 on: May 22, 2015, 09:55:27 PM »
It's my go to yeast for all my ciders.

I did one last year with Munton's that turned out pretty good.
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Re: Nottingham dry yeast
« Reply #10 on: May 25, 2015, 02:55:35 AM »
However, if you pitch it with Windsor I think it's fantastic.  Can't explain that, but I've experienced it.

Those two strains work together so well that I often wonder if they were isolated from the same mixed culture.