Author Topic: Big brew Barleywine  (Read 1365 times)

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Big brew Barleywine
« Reply #15 on: June 05, 2015, 11:47:32 AM »
Transferred my Big Brewday Barleywine to secondary today with a Medium+ oak spiral which had been soaking in Knob Creek.

The SG measured 1.017

Should I be worried about it being too 'thin'?
Thanks



Not at all.  It's difficult, if not impossible, to brew a thin barleywine. A big malty beer that starts with an OG as high as barleywine leaves a ton of malty character in your beer regardless of your FG.  Think of the  Belgian Quads -  they're essentially Belgian barleywines and they all finish low and have tons of malty richness.  FWIW, I mash barleywines @ 148F for 90 minutes, they finish fairly low, and have a ton of body and richness.
Jon H.

Offline erockrph

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Re: Big brew Barleywine
« Reply #16 on: June 05, 2015, 01:12:56 PM »
Transferred my Big Brewday Barleywine to secondary today with a Medium+ oak spiral which had been soaking in Knob Creek.

The SG measured 1.017

Should I be worried about it being too 'thin'?
Thanks



Not at all.  It's difficult, if not impossible, to brew a thin barleywine. A big malty beer that starts with an OG as high as barleywine leaves a ton of malty character in your beer regardless of your FG.  Think of the  Belgian Quads -  they're essentially Belgian barleywines and they all finish low and have tons of malty richness.  FWIW, I mash barleywines @ 148F for 90 minutes, they finish fairly low, and have a ton of body and richness.
+1 - Alcohol tends to add a nice mouthfeel in bigger beers. Plus, since alcohol is lighter than water a higher alcohol beer has more dextrins remaining compared to a lower gravity beer that finishes at the same gravity (in other words, alcohol lowers the gravity of a beer).

And I can't say I've ever had a beer that seemed thin that finished at 1.017, barleywine or not.
Eric B.

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Offline toby

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Re: Big brew Barleywine
« Reply #17 on: June 05, 2015, 01:21:55 PM »
Not at all.  It's difficult, if not impossible, to brew a thin barleywine. A big malty beer that starts with an OG as high as barleywine leaves a ton of malty character in your beer regardless of your FG.  Think of the  Belgian Quads -  they're essentially Belgian barleywines and they all finish low and have tons of malty richness.  FWIW, I mash barleywines @ 148F for 90 minutes, they finish fairly low, and have a ton of body and richness.

This.  I switched up my Scotch ale to more of a barleywine style mash (~148F for 90 minutes) almost 2 years ago.  The more fermentable wort makes it more balanced for the alcohol level.  It gives it more dryness to the finish (I used to pitch some pasteur champagne yeast to dry it out, but that became unnecessary after changing the mash), but still has plenty body.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Big brew Barleywine
« Reply #18 on: June 05, 2015, 01:22:12 PM »
And I can't say I've ever had a beer that seemed thin that finished at 1.017, barleywine or not.

Yeah.  That would be anything but thin in any beer.
Jon H.

Offline The10mmKid

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Re: Big brew Barleywine
« Reply #19 on: June 05, 2015, 10:49:37 PM »
Thank You for the comforting replies.
Mr. Strong's recipe finished at 1.033, so when my WL PC-1217 West Coast yeast kept chewing away, I got a little worried.
Yes it is warm from the alcohol and super hoppy as all-git-out, so things should even out down the road . . . . way down the road. Had a beautiful bitter sweet tea thing going into the fermenter. :)

'da Kid
« Last Edit: June 05, 2015, 10:51:29 PM by The10mmKid »
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