Author Topic: Pepper Tincture  (Read 1263 times)

Offline flbrewer

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Pepper Tincture
« on: June 10, 2015, 07:38:41 PM »
Does anyone have experience with making pepper tinctures? I picked up some habaneros and wanted to make some tinctures with vodka to gauge the impact on a beer. Thanks for any tips.


Offline gman23

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Re: Pepper Tincture
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2015, 07:43:22 PM »
It just so happens that I have habaneros in the keg right now. Are you bottling or kegging? If you are kegging you can just throw them in until the beer is to your liking and then pull them.
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Offline flbrewer

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Re: Pepper Tincture
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2015, 08:03:17 PM »
It just so happens that I have habaneros in the keg right now. Are you bottling or kegging? If you are kegging you can just throw them in until the beer is to your liking and then pull them.
Kegging. I assumed a tincture would be more measured. Can you expand on how you pull them? Are you using a bag, or are you transferring to another keg to rack the beer off the peppers?

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Pepper Tincture
« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2015, 08:07:24 PM »
Tinctures are the best way to get the most out of your peppers, and to add the flavors, aroma, and heat in a controlled manner without going overboard.  It's all I ever do.  I chop mine then soak in warm vodka or tequila, slightly microwaved for just a few seconds.  With warmed spirits, just 5 or 6 hours is enough to get a lot out of them, but overnight is probably even better.  Then add about half as much of the liquid as you think you need, mix it in well, and taste a sample.  If it needs more, use more.  If not, make a bloody mary and call it good.  :)
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Offline gman23

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Re: Pepper Tincture
« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2015, 08:20:09 PM »
It just so happens that I have habaneros in the keg right now. Are you bottling or kegging? If you are kegging you can just throw them in until the beer is to your liking and then pull them.
Kegging. I assumed a tincture would be more measured. Can you expand on how you pull them? Are you using a bag, or are you transferring to another keg to rack the beer off the peppers?

I have had the best luck by dicing a deveined and deseeded pepper then putting it in a muslin bag that is to be suspended in the keg by plumber's tape. I was lazy this time and did not dice the pepper, just quartered it. I may have to add some more to speed up the process.

A tincture would definitely be more measured but I find this easy because I can taste it every day to see how the flavor develops and halt the process when it is perfect to me. Also, I don't have to worry about measurements for future batches.
« Last Edit: June 10, 2015, 08:23:20 PM by goschman »
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Offline flbrewer

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Re: Pepper Tincture
« Reply #5 on: June 10, 2015, 08:22:42 PM »

Tinctures are the best way to get the most out of your peppers, and to add the flavors, aroma, and heat in a controlled manner without going overboard.  It's all I ever do.  I chop mine then soak in warm vodka or tequila, slightly microwaved for just a few seconds.  With warmed spirits, just 5 or 6 hours is enough to get a lot out of them, but overnight is probably even better.  Then add about half as much of the liquid as you think you need, mix it in well, and taste a sample.  If it needs more, use more.  If not, make a bloody mary and call it good.  :)
are you adding the liquid to a single beer and simply multiplying the amount for your batch?

Offline denny

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Re: Pepper Tincture
« Reply #6 on: June 10, 2015, 08:42:33 PM »
Does anyone have experience with making pepper tinctures? I picked up some habaneros and wanted to make some tinctures with vodka to gauge the impact on a beer. Thanks for any tips.

Put the vodka and peppers in a PET bottle.  Put on a carbinator cap and hit it with about 40 psi.  Shake for 30 seconds and you've got your tincture.
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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Pepper Tincture
« Reply #7 on: June 10, 2015, 08:51:05 PM »

Tinctures are the best way to get the most out of your peppers, and to add the flavors, aroma, and heat in a controlled manner without going overboard.  It's all I ever do.  I chop mine then soak in warm vodka or tequila, slightly microwaved for just a few seconds.  With warmed spirits, just 5 or 6 hours is enough to get a lot out of them, but overnight is probably even better.  Then add about half as much of the liquid as you think you need, mix it in well, and taste a sample.  If it needs more, use more.  If not, make a bloody mary and call it good.  :)
are you adding the liquid to a single beer and simply multiplying the amount for your batch?

I haven't done it that way, but that's not a bad idea.  I play with jalapenos.  For jalapenos I find that an average of about 9 peppers in 5 gallons seems to be about the right amount -- sometimes it's a little too much and other times it's just right.  If I were to ever try habaneros, I know those are really strong so I'd probably start with just like 1/2 of one pepper in 5 gallons, then adjust from there.  I think 1/2 a habanero pepper is probably about right, but I haven't tried it to confirm.  Cayenne would be someplace in between, maybe 3 or 4.  Ghost peppers.... why bother, you can't taste them anyway.  Maybe 1/8 of a ghost pepper, but that's a wild guess.
Dave

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Offline flbrewer

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Re: Pepper Tincture
« Reply #8 on: June 10, 2015, 10:14:10 PM »
I'll post my findings...for now I've cut about 2 grams of Habenero (about half the pepper, seeds removed) and 2 ounces of Vodka (warmed).

I'm going to soak like you suggested and use a dropper to dose a beer. Wish me luck, I've already rubbed my eyes once  :o