Author Topic: Mixing yeast  (Read 1015 times)

Offline Rimrock66

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Mixing yeast
« on: June 11, 2015, 04:51:45 PM »
I was wondering if anyone has used two different yeast brands in the same batch? I am making a 10 gal batch of Imperial IPA and have a White Labs Cal Ale V and Wyeast 1272 American Ale II. Going to make a starter.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Mixing yeast
« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2015, 05:05:00 PM »
I've done it lots of times, with good results. I actually have a saison ready now that used 2 strains. IMO those 2 strains would blend together nicely.
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Offline Rimrock66

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Re: Mixing yeast
« Reply #2 on: June 11, 2015, 05:08:14 PM »
Thanks HoosierBrew!

Offline erockrph

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Re: Mixing yeast
« Reply #3 on: June 11, 2015, 05:13:54 PM »
Those are allegedly the same strain (as is BRY-97), so I don't see an issue using them together.
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Offline brewinhard

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Re: Mixing yeast
« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2015, 06:23:15 PM »
Yep.  Brewing a simple Patersbier tomorrow and will be using a blend of WY 3787 and 1214.  Yeast blends can really help your beer stand out in a crowd.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Mixing yeast
« Reply #5 on: June 11, 2015, 06:29:04 PM »
Yep.  Brewing a simple Patersbier tomorrow and will be using a blend of WY 3787 and 1214.  Yeast blends can really help your beer stand out in a crowd.

Yep                                         
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Offline denny

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Re: Mixing yeast
« Reply #6 on: June 13, 2015, 08:08:06 PM »
The downside to using a blend ia that you never really know whiich yeast will dominate.  As long as you're Ok with that, no problem.  I prefer to split the bacth, ferment each woth a different yeast, then blend them back together.
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Offline brewinhard

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Re: Mixing yeast
« Reply #7 on: June 13, 2015, 09:53:55 PM »
The downside to using a blend ia that you never really know whiich yeast will dominate.  As long as you're Ok with that, no problem.  I prefer to split the bacth, ferment each woth a different yeast, then blend them back together.

Very true.  Sometimes that is half the fun finding out which one comes across more in the final profile.  I try to choose yeast blends that (as you stated) would pair well together and blend nicely even if one outcompetes the other. 

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Mixing yeast
« Reply #8 on: June 13, 2015, 10:33:15 PM »
Very true.  Sometimes that is half the fun finding out which one comes across more in the final profile.  I try to choose yeast blends that (as you stated) would pair well together and blend nicely even if one outcompetes the other. 

I agree. Sometimes I blend for complexity and sometimes it's to get the character of one yeast and the attenuative nature of another. Not all strains are meant to hang out together, though.
Jon H.

Offline Steve Ruch

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Re: Mixing yeast
« Reply #9 on: June 14, 2015, 03:54:41 PM »
Why not just make a larger starter with one or the other?
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Mixing yeast
« Reply #10 on: June 14, 2015, 05:12:07 PM »
Why not just make a larger starter with one or the other?

That's what I do when I blend yeast strains (which isn't real often) -  I don't mix them into one starter, I make two starters and vary the size of each depending on what I'm after.
Jon H.

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Re: Mixing yeast
« Reply #11 on: June 17, 2015, 03:55:34 PM »
Almost every brewing strain in existence today was at one point part of a mixed culture.   When experimenting with mixed culture, a good strategy is to mix flocculent strains with non-flocculent strains.   A good place to start liquid yeast-wise is Wyeast 1968/WLP002 and Wy1007/WLP036.    This combo gives a brewer a mixed culture that produces good flavor, attenuates well, and top crops.   While I do not care for Nottingham or Windsor when used as single-strain cultures, they go together like peanut butter and jelly.