Author Topic: English ipa  (Read 1460 times)

Offline VALKIRIA01

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English ipa
« on: June 16, 2015, 10:10:34 PM »
Hey guys , how do you like an english ipa with 80% pale ale, 7% wheat, 11% crystal 60l , 1 target, 1 simcoe and 1 1/5 fuggles? Would you say it has what it takes for an ipa?

Offline toby

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Re: English ipa
« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2015, 11:18:56 PM »
Hey guys , how do you like an english ipa with 80% pale ale, 7% wheat, 11% crystal 60l , 1 target, 1 simcoe and 1 1/5 fuggles? Would you say it has what it takes for an ipa?
For an English IPA, I'm not sure why the wheat?  Generally speaking, I would go with ~90% British Pale and maybe ~10% Carastan or C40L.  Well, and I would tend to stick with EKG or Fuggles for the hops.

Offline duboman

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Re: English ipa
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2015, 11:48:05 PM »
I would leave out the wheat as well and actually go with 90% MO, maybe 5% crystal and 5% Munich with noble hops and ferment with WY 1968
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: English ipa
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2015, 12:05:20 AM »
I would leave out the wheat as well and actually go with 90% MO, maybe 5% crystal and 5% Munich with noble hops and ferment with WY 1968

+1.  And I'd definitely drop the Simcoe and go with all British hops, especially EKG late. 40-60ish IBUs. 
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Re: English ipa
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2015, 12:46:35 AM »
English ale is my specialty.  Traditional English-style IPA does not contain crystal malt or munich malt.  The grist is composed of 100% pale malt or mostly pale malt with a touch of torrified wheat. Traditional English IPA is also more bitter than American IPA.  American IPA has more late hoping and less kettle hopping.

Offline pete b

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Re: English ipa
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2015, 01:08:40 AM »
Love lots of EKG for this style.
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Offline VALKIRIA01

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Re: English ipa
« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2015, 01:37:18 AM »
Appreciate it , i had second thoughts bout the simcoe , just had the the oz there i used fuggle as late addition , couldnt get any ekg

Offline dannyjed

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Re: English ipa
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2015, 06:33:21 PM »
English ale is my specialty.  Traditional English-style IPA does not contain crystal malt or munich malt.  The grist is composed of 100% pale malt or mostly pale malt with a touch of torrified wheat. Traditional English IPA is also more bitter than American IPA.  American IPA has more late hoping and less kettle hopping.
I was wondering what yeast that you prefer for English IPA?
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Re: English ipa
« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2015, 08:08:08 PM »
Sadly, I am still searching for "the one" when it comes to English IPA strains.  None of the strains that are available from Wyeast and White Labs are true Burton-style strains.  Lately, I have been experimenting with a culture collection yeast strain called NCYC 1108.  NCYC 1108 is attenuative enough to be an IPA strain, but it is not a traditional IPA strain from what I can ascertain. 

Offline dannyjed

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Re: English ipa
« Reply #9 on: June 17, 2015, 08:42:16 PM »
Sadly, I am still searching for "the one" when it comes to English IPA strains.  None of the strains that are available from Wyeast and White Labs are true Burton-style strains.  Lately, I have been experimenting with a culture collection yeast strain called NCYC 1108.  NCYC 1108 is attenuative enough to be an IPA strain, but it is not a traditional IPA strain from what I can ascertain.
I see that Wyeast has a private collection Burton style blend (WY 1203). I wonder what that would be like?
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Re: English ipa
« Reply #10 on: June 17, 2015, 09:16:54 PM »
I see that Wyeast has a private collection Burton style blend (WY 1203). I wonder what that would be like?

That's just a made up name for a mixture of strains in the Wyeast collection.  True Burton strains are non-flocculent, which is why the union brewing system became so popular.   The union design allows for harvesting of non-flocculent yeast cells.  A true Burton strain has an apparent attenuation of at least 80%.

Offline dannyjed

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Re: English ipa
« Reply #11 on: June 18, 2015, 08:38:16 PM »
I see that Wyeast has a private collection Burton style blend (WY 1203). I wonder what that would be like?

That's just a made up name for a mixture of strains in the Wyeast collection.  True Burton strains are non-flocculent, which is why the union brewing system became so popular.   The union design allows for harvesting of non-flocculent yeast cells.  A true Burton strain has an apparent attenuation of at least 80%.
Good to know. So does that mean that there are no true Burton yeast strains available for brewers? I appreciate your knowledge on the subject.
Dan Chisholm

Offline VALKIRIA01

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Re: English ipa
« Reply #12 on: June 19, 2015, 02:02:00 AM »
Yes, indeed

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Re: English ipa
« Reply #13 on: June 19, 2015, 12:16:33 PM »
Good to know. So does that mean that there are no true Burton yeast strains available for brewers? I appreciate your knowledge on the subject.

To the best of my knowledge, neither of the two major yeast propagators is offering a historically accurate Burton strain.  R.S.W. Thorne, who I believe was Catherine Roberts' husband, deposited the Burton strain shown below in the NCYC in the fifties.  Catherine Roberts was an American born scientist who pioneered the field of yeast genetics with Øjvind Winge at Carlsberg labs in the forties and early fifties.  I have a yeast culture that she deposited in the U.C. Davis collection in forties.


NCYC 231

Depositor: R.S.W. Thorne
Deposit Name:  Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Month of deposit: June
Deposit Year: 1951
Habitat: Brewing strain
Equivalent Strain Designations: Strain V, Burton-on-Trent brewery strain
Deposit: > 15mm
Head Formation:  No Head
Attenuation: 1.006-1.008
Clarity of Final Beer:    >20
Fermentation Rate: 4-6°
Flocculence: N/A

One data point that is not given here is the original gravity used for the fermentation tests.  That gravity was 10% w/v, or 1.040.  With a final gravity in 1.006 to 1.008 range, we are looking at apparent attenuation levels of
in the 80 to 85% range.  A true Burton yeast strain is a non-flocculent strain that does not produce a skimmable head, which is why the union system was so critical to maintaining a healthy culture.  These strains would not work well in traditional skimming or double-drop breweries.
« Last Edit: June 19, 2015, 06:25:48 PM by S. cerevisiae »

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: English ipa
« Reply #14 on: June 19, 2015, 02:44:54 PM »
Marstons still uses a union system. I wonder why that one is not on the market?
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