Author Topic: Souring old home brew  (Read 477 times)

Offline leowaiau

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Souring old home brew
« on: June 23, 2015, 11:34:01 PM »
I have some of my oatmeal stout that's been sittings in bottles in my closet for about 6 months- my question is this: Would it be possible to empty the bottles in a carboy maybe add some honey and pitch some bugs on it and let it sit? Is that a good idea or is just doomed to failure?


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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Souring old home brew
« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2015, 11:53:28 PM »
it will likely get badly oxidized in the process of decanting. Cooking is a good use of old homebrew though.
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Offline erockrph

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Re: Souring old home brew
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2015, 12:11:42 AM »
it will likely get badly oxidized in the process of decanting. Cooking is a good use of old homebrew though.
There are ways to minimize oxidation to the point where this wouldn't necessarily be doomed to failure right off the bat. Brettanomyces is pretty good at scavenging O2, or at least converting oxidation byproducts into tastier compounds. I'd get a starter of Brett going in the final fermentation vessel, and carefully pour the bottles into the starter while it is still showing signs of activity. I can't guarantee that it will be good, but if you have the fermenter space available then no harm in trying it out.

You might have trouble getting any sourness out of a finished beer. The hops and alcohol will inhibit lactobacillus from being very productive. Pediococcus will work on complex carbohydrates, but it's slow. A Brett-aged beer seems like the best bet, but if you have patience you might be able to get some acidity from a Pedio-Brett blend.

And I agree completely that cooking is an excellent use for old homebrew, especially maltier beers.
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Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: Souring old home brew
« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2015, 01:21:53 AM »
What's wrong with the beer as it is now?
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Offline jtoots

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Re: Souring old home brew
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2015, 05:01:12 PM »
What's wrong with the beer as it is now?

+1 drink the bad boys?

Offline leowaiau

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Re: Souring old home brew
« Reply #5 on: June 24, 2015, 10:57:46 PM »

What's wrong with the beer as it is now?

Nothing much. They just aren't my favorite batch and I'm looking to experiment on them. Haha


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Offline duboman

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Re: Souring old home brew
« Reply #6 on: June 25, 2015, 01:03:47 AM »
I say use them for cooking, maybe a batch of BBQ sauce too!
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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Souring old home brew
« Reply #7 on: June 25, 2015, 12:09:03 PM »

What's wrong with the beer as it is now?

Nothing much. They just aren't my favorite batch and I'm looking to experiment on them. Haha


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On further reflection I think you should go for it. worst case scenerio they get oxidized. no big loss.
"Creativity is the residue of wasted time"
-A Einstein

"errors are [...] the portals of discovery"
- J Joyce