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Author Topic: Fast ipa  (Read 13791 times)

Offline homoeccentricus

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Re: Fast ipa
« Reply #30 on: July 13, 2015, 12:31:06 pm »
I forgot to add that this kind of schedule would all but require a more flocculant yeast strain.
Suggestion? I'm open to anything.
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Offline brewinhard

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Re: Fast ipa
« Reply #31 on: July 13, 2015, 12:33:03 pm »
I forgot to add that this kind of schedule would all but require a more flocculant yeast strain.

yes, but that is why he is choosing to fine with gelatin.  I say you give it a shot and see what happens.  I don't see why you can't turn this beer around in the time frame you are looking for as long as you make some of the minor adjustments mentioned here.  Take good notes, and next time you brew for a comp or brew this recipe again then you will know how to better plan for it. 

Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Fast ipa
« Reply #32 on: July 13, 2015, 12:40:53 pm »
I would try to time the starter to pitch it at high krausen or close to it.  That has worked well for me lately...I just pitched a 1L starter that was only about 5 hours old in a Hefeweizen and fermented it at 62F.  I had to go with a blowoff tube after a few hours - this could be the quickest high krausen I have seen at 62F.  It's only one data point, but it confirms well enough for me what Mark is saying about yeast vitality being key to good starts, rather than merely cell numbers.
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Offline denny

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Re: Fast ipa
« Reply #33 on: July 13, 2015, 01:48:27 pm »
I see no reason why an IPA shouldn't be ready to drink in three weeks.  Two weeks to ferment, keg, dry hop for a week and carb, jump to another keg, fill up a couple of bottles and cap for the competition.  IPAs are best fresh.

Except that I need to bottle condition. No kegs.  :P

I can feel a chance to say "I told ya so" coming on..... ;D

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Well, either that or "I was wrong again!".  ;)
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Offline a10t2

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Re: Fast ipa
« Reply #34 on: July 13, 2015, 04:15:15 pm »
Suggestion? I'm open to anything.

I don't know what you have access, but any of the less characterful American or British strains would do well for the style. 1098, 1099, 1272, or 1335 would all be good choices IMHO.

yes, but that is why he is choosing to fine with gelatin.

Like I said, I don't have any experience with gelatin, but on the other hand neither does he.
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Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Fast ipa
« Reply #35 on: July 13, 2015, 04:17:04 pm »
Are you sure your yeast will follow the schedule?
Enlighten me oh Masters. What's the best yeast pitch plan within the given constraints? How much yeast? What kind of starter? It's a 15 liter batch, American ale yeast. I do have a couple of days to prepare a starter.
Oh the pressure! My question was to point out that it might not be done fermenting when you have planned it to be done. I'll take a swing at the question though. If I was in a hurry, I would pitch a little on the large side, I would pitch the starter at full krausen, I would pitch at a moderate temp for whatever yeast I chose and hold it there till activity took off then starts to slow down. When it starts to slow down I would ramp up the temp to the top end of that yeast's range. I would let it go to final gravity, maybe over dry hop on the days between FG readings. At FG I would crash to 0C for a day, then package. Maybe it would be done in time, maybe not.

Offline homoeccentricus

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Re: Fast ipa
« Reply #36 on: July 13, 2015, 04:29:47 pm »
Suggestion? I'm open to anything.

I don't know what you have access, but any of the less characterful American or British strains would do well for the style. 1098, 1099, 1272, or 1335 would all be good choices IMHO.

yes, but that is why he is choosing to fine with gelatin.

Like I said, I don't have any experience with gelatin, but on the other hand neither does he.
The decision to use gelatin comes from the Hop Fu recipe. It's independent of the time issue.
Frank P.

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Offline homoeccentricus

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Re: Fast ipa
« Reply #37 on: July 13, 2015, 04:33:02 pm »

I don't know what you have access, but any of the less characterful American or British strains would do well for the style. 1098, 1099, 1272, or 1335 would all be good choices IMHO.


I have access to most if not all Wyeast strains.
Frank P.

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Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Fast ipa
« Reply #38 on: July 13, 2015, 04:39:15 pm »
In addition to all the good points made, my biggest concern wouldn't be having it done in three weeks, but not knowing if it was any good before entering.

Yep.  This is a cart before the horse kinda thing.  Make a good beer, THEN decide to enter it.  Don't decide to enter, then hope you have a good beer.

The problem is, this is Belgium & The Netherlands, not the US of A. There are about 3 competitions per year in the 2 countries combined. There is almost no homebrewing culture here. I can't brew a beer and sit on the porch waiting until a competition calls my name.
This aspect of the debate points to what I have been trying to say about competitions.

The reason home brew competitions exist is to raise money. If home brew competition organizers organized competitions simply because they want home brewers to be rewarded for great beer, the competitions would be free. So only submitting beer that you know will win, or should win, is not the desire of the organizer. If that were so, in a perfect world, they would only get one entry per award given. Not a good fund raising plan. They want as many beers as they can handle. So I say, enter whatever you want.

Having said that, if you want to do well you might consider entering your best beer. Or if its a popular competition,  like NHC, and you are only allowed to enter X amount of beers, enter the best of the bunch.

But what you are doing is perfectly fine. In fact, you are ahead of the curve because you are actively seeking suggestions for how to do the best job in the short amount of time.

To summarize, if anyone is considering entering a competition,  I say go for it. Just realize the reasons to enter. 1. Help a local club or brewing promoter raise funds. 2. Its just for fun. 3. Dont expect awesome feedback. In fact, the score sheets are likely going to disappoint you if your expectations are high. If the judges dont like your beer, just remember... they are wrong! ;-) 4. If you end up with a ribbon or medal, ride the glory! You are clearly an awesome brewer. ;-)

Offline a10t2

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Re: Fast ipa
« Reply #39 on: July 13, 2015, 04:40:52 pm »
My personal recommendation, then, would be to try 1272 and forget about the gelatin. Minimize the unknowns for something that's intended for competition.
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Offline homoeccentricus

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Re: Fast ipa
« Reply #40 on: July 13, 2015, 05:02:28 pm »
My personal recommendation, then, would be to try 1272 and forget about the gelatin. Minimize the unknowns for something that's intended for competition.
Ok I'll think about the 1272, although I read in a couple of places that it can be slower than the 1056. Is that true?

And I don't understand your point about the gelatin. What can go wrong? You heat it in water, you add it to the cold beer, you stir a bit, you come back two days later and it's done. Or not?
Frank P.

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Offline a10t2

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Re: Fast ipa
« Reply #41 on: July 13, 2015, 05:11:34 pm »
Ok I'll think about the 1272, although I read in a couple of places that it can be slower than the 1056. Is that true?

If it is, the difference is marginal. I only check gravity once a day, so if it's taking 4.5 days instead of 3.5 I might not notice.

And I don't understand your point about the gelatin. What can go wrong?

I can't really speak to procedures for gelatin. My only point was that I wouldn't try something new for a beer I intended to serve to others.
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Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Fast ipa
« Reply #42 on: July 13, 2015, 05:30:10 pm »
Ok I'll think about the 1272, although I read in a couple of places that it can be slower than the 1056. Is that true?

If it is, the difference is marginal. I only check gravity once a day, so if it's taking 4.5 days instead of 3.5 I might not notice.

And I don't understand your point about the gelatin. What can go wrong?

I can't really speak to procedures for gelatin. My only point was that I wouldn't try something new for a beer I intended to serve to others.
As simple as it seems, the first couple tries were a train wreck for me. One did nothing, the other put little gel rubbery blobs in the beer. I have it nailed down now and swear by it.

Offline homoeccentricus

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Re: Fast ipa
« Reply #43 on: July 14, 2015, 01:08:39 am »
Ok I'll think about the 1272, although I read in a couple of places that it can be slower than the 1056. Is that true?

If it is, the difference is marginal. I only check gravity once a day, so if it's taking 4.5 days instead of 3.5 I might not notice.

And I don't understand your point about the gelatin. What can go wrong?

I can't really speak to procedures for gelatin. My only point was that I wouldn't try something new for a beer I intended to serve to others.
As simple as it seems, the first couple tries were a train wreck for me. One did nothing, the other put little gel rubbery blobs in the beer. I have it nailed down now and swear by it.
You are just writing this to scare me, right?
Frank P.

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Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Fast ipa
« Reply #44 on: July 14, 2015, 01:19:32 am »
Ok I'll think about the 1272, although I read in a couple of places that it can be slower than the 1056. Is that true?

If it is, the difference is marginal. I only check gravity once a day, so if it's taking 4.5 days instead of 3.5 I might not notice.

And I don't understand your point about the gelatin. What can go wrong?

I can't really speak to procedures for gelatin. My only point was that I wouldn't try something new for a beer I intended to serve to others.
As simple as it seems, the first couple tries were a train wreck for me. One did nothing, the other put little gel rubbery blobs in the beer. I have it nailed down now and swear by it.
You are just writing this to scare me, right?
No, just that you might want to try it first. Or enter your beer as a specialty IPA with little jelly boogers