Author Topic: Brewing Water Filtration Systems  (Read 857 times)

Offline mba0006

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Brewing Water Filtration Systems
« on: August 19, 2015, 01:03:12 AM »
Hi all. I'm new here so go easy on me. I started home brewing a couple years ago and noticed that not much has been done for home brewers when it comes to water. I personally have been buying 5 Gallon bottles from the grocery store. My background is in water treatment and I've actually worked with a few micro and larger breweries. Do you believe there is a market for a system that home brewers could use? Any advice as to cost? Design? Like hooking up to a water hose or kitchen faucet? Just want to get an overall reaction to the idea. Not making it a business venture, just a couple to friends and brew buddies. Any feedback is appreciated!

Thanks,

Mike

Offline Stevie

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Re: Brewing Water Filtration Systems
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2015, 01:36:32 AM »
I think home RO systems have the market covered. Only downside is the waste water, but that can be minimized by diverting into a cistern or rain barrel vs down the drain.

Offline mba0006

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Re: Brewing Water Filtration Systems
« Reply #2 on: August 19, 2015, 02:04:47 AM »
RO is going to take minerals out of the water. Do you add some back to rebuild the water's profile? I think a portable carbon and sediment filter combo would be ideal if you have decent water. Removes the suspended solids and chlorine/chloramine in water. Since everyone's water is different, there is no 'one size fits all' but this would at least give home brewers a healthy water to brew with. I'm going to build one for myself, maybe this weekend. I'll post pictures and test the water. Just tired of using 5 gallon jugs haha.

Offline Stevie

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Re: Brewing Water Filtration Systems
« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2015, 02:12:59 AM »
Small carbon block filters exist as well and are quite cheap. I use RO and add salts as needed. They must be run very slow to remove chloramine.

Offline toby

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Re: Brewing Water Filtration Systems
« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2015, 03:11:23 PM »
Would you be referring to something like this?
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0018N0XCI

That does pretty much exactly everything you say, with the exception that you're going to have to run it _very_ slowly to remove chloramines, but honestly it's easy to just use campden specifically for chloramines even if you use this sort of sediment/GAC/KDF filter.

I use exactly that method for my basic water and then build up some minerals our tap water lacks and acidify as needed (both based on rough style, i.e. light hoppy, or dark malty)

Offline mba0006

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Re: Brewing Water Filtration Systems
« Reply #5 on: August 19, 2015, 03:39:42 PM »
Yes Toby, very similar! I would want something a bit more portable, I assume that one has to be mounted to a wall or try to keep it standing straight up somehow. You're right about running it slow to remove chlorine, at 2.5 gpm I doubt that system is removing a significant portion of the chlorine. A better carbon block, or multiple blocks could help. Or a system with a slower flow rate. You really don't need 2.5 gpm to fill a 5 gallon bucket. Good information, thanks.

Offline Stevie

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Re: Brewing Water Filtration Systems
« Reply #6 on: August 19, 2015, 04:11:16 PM »
When I used a block filter, I ran it at just over a trickle. I used the time it took to pull my water to get other things setup and eat breakfast.

Offline garcastle

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Re: Brewing Water Filtration Systems
« Reply #7 on: August 30, 2015, 04:06:34 PM »
Hmm, I've been using a Kent Marine R/O system for years.

Now you have me wondering if I need the 3rd chamber (DI/etc.).  If I take it out and leave the sediment filter and the carbon filter, I wonder if I would be fine.  That 3rd filter is the costly b**** ($30++) to replace.  I'd still have lots of waste water that I should do something with.

Cheers,
G.