Author Topic: Cider  (Read 707 times)

Offline joshthebrewer

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Cider
« on: September 13, 2015, 10:12:41 PM »
I got 1 gallon of very fresh non pasteurized straight apple cider I wanted to ferment into a hard cider, maybe with some cinnamon sticks in it.

My question is what kind of yeast would be suggested and I think I need a nutrient. and does it need to be cold ferment? 

Any other suggestions would also be extremely helpful.

   Thanks

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Cider
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2015, 11:08:15 PM »
Dave

The world will become a much more pleasant place to live when each and every one of us realizes that we are all idiots.

Offline joshthebrewer

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Re: Cider
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2015, 11:23:32 PM »
I'll just put this here.

https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=21265.msg269329#msg269329



Thanks I'll use that, I guess that the fermentation take some time since you say for the first month.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Cider
« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2015, 11:24:23 PM »
I got 1 gallon of very fresh non pasteurized straight apple cider I wanted to ferment into a hard cider, maybe with some cinnamon sticks in it.

My question is what kind of yeast would be suggested and I think I need a nutrient. and does it need to be cold ferment? 

Any other suggestions would also be extremely helpful.

   Thanks


Lots of ways to make good cider. You can use most strains of yeast that you'd use for beer for cider. Wyeast sells an actual cider strain (4766) that I've used many times with good results. You can also use a clean neutral strain like 1056/001/S05 or an English strain like WLP002 with good results as well.

 As for nutrient and temperature, there is debate. Some people ferment at ale temps and use nutrient, while others use little or no nutrient and ferment cooler to create a slower fermentation and possibly preserve more of the apple character. Personally I like to ferment cider around 60F depending on strain. Lots of ways to make cider though.

 Also, I add crushed Campden tablets (to kill wild yeast) and pectic enzyme (to help clarify the cider) 24 hrs before pitching the yeast. I keep it in primary for around a month after which time fermentation should be finished. I then rack to secondary to age a bit and clarify. Cider making is pretty straight forward and easy compared to beer making . Any more questions don't hesitate to ask. Good luck !
Jon H.

Offline joshthebrewer

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Re: Cider
« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2015, 11:40:02 PM »
I got 1 gallon of very fresh non pasteurized straight apple cider I wanted to ferment into a hard cider, maybe with some cinnamon sticks in it.

My question is what kind of yeast would be suggested and I think I need a nutrient. and does it need to be cold ferment? 

Any other suggestions would also be extremely helpful.

   Thanks


Lots of ways to make good cider. You can use most strains of yeast that you'd use for beer for cider. Wyeast sells an actual cider strain (4766) that I've used many times with good results. You can also use a clean neutral strain like 1056/001/S05 or an English strain like WLP002 with good results as well.

 As for nutrient and temperature, there is debate. Some people ferment at ale temps and use nutrient, while others use little or no nutrient and ferment cooler to create a slower fermentation and possibly preserve more of the apple character. Personally I like to ferment cider around 60F depending on strain. Lots of ways to make cider though.

 Also, I add crushed Campden tablets (to kill wild yeast) and pectic enzyme (to help clarify the cider) 24 hrs before pitching the yeast. I keep it in primary for around a month after which time fermentation should be finished. I then rack to secondary to age a bit and clarify. Cider making is pretty straight forward and easy compared to beer making . Any more questions don't hesitate to ask. Good luck !


Thanks,

I have a couple tubes of Fermatrix (small Local yeast maker) ale yeast in my fridge (nice when the owner hooks you up)  That should be similar to like an 001 that it sounds like I could use. mmmmm, new stuff to think about.

Offline realbeerguy

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Re: Cider
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2015, 01:08:46 AM »
62dF, Cotes de Blanc yeast, no nutrients.  If you want to go New England style, add brown sugar, raisins or dates, cinnamon optional
Member Savannah Brewers League & Lowcountry MALTS

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Offline erockrph

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Re: Cider
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2015, 04:06:59 AM »
There are many ways to skin that cat. I like T-58 and S-04 for ale yeasts if I'm bottle conditioning. They'll go dry, but not bone dry. I get a lot of sulfur with no nutrients, the fermentation takes a bit longer, and the beer finishes a bit sweeter.

My current SOP is to use 71B wine yeast, along with nutrient, pectic enzyme and apple juice concentrate to boost the OG to the 1.060-1.070 range. It finishes quick, then I sulfite/sorbate and backsweeten with fresh juice. This dilutes it back down to 6% or so, adds some apple flavor back, and sweetens it to my liking. Then I keg and carbonate.
Eric B.

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Offline theDarkSide

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Re: Cider
« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2015, 12:56:06 PM »
Nottingham has been my choice for cider making for the past couple years.  Also, I ferment in my basement without temp control, which sits around 67-70 this time of the year.  I also add nutrients to my ciders.

I have great success with these ciders from the drinking aspect and in competitions.
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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Cider
« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2015, 01:38:06 PM »
I liked my cider made with Notty last year but it did have a very odd peachy flavor.  But it did turn out semi-sweet which I liked.  US-05 on the other hand was exquisitely clean, crisp, and pleasantly appley, and very dry and tart which I hadn't expected.  Given my choice of the dry ale yeasts, I'd use US-05 again before anything else.  For wine yeasts, I've found nothing better than Cote des Blancs, which is surprisingly not too far different from US-05.

In both/all cases, my fermentations were/are carried out in the 50s and then 40s Fahrenheit for several months.
Dave

The world will become a much more pleasant place to live when each and every one of us realizes that we are all idiots.

Offline pete b

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Re: Cider
« Reply #9 on: September 14, 2015, 05:19:33 PM »
I'm not really suggesting this with your lone gallon of cider, but in good years when I have a lot of cider I'll take a gallon in a glass jug and do nothing other than put a bung and airlock on it. It always tastes good, at least so far. Just an example of how simple it can be.
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Offline joshthebrewer

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Re: Cider
« Reply #10 on: September 15, 2015, 11:28:38 PM »
thanks for all the input. It just shows how easy it can be and how much planning i need to put into it.