Author Topic: Plate Chiller  (Read 1054 times)

Offline Indy574

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 147
    • View Profile
Plate Chiller
« on: September 13, 2015, 11:42:25 PM »
I was thinking of getting a plate chiller to help reduce my time chilling to pitching temperature.  I spent nearly 40 minutes just to get to 78F with 71F tap water.  I would be using gravity to feed  the chiller to start with then possibly in the future moving to a pump as funds permit.
I currently use a 25ft copper immersion chiller.  Is it worth the cost to save on water and time?

Offline hopfenundmalz

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 9006
  • Milford, MI
    • View Profile
Re: Plate Chiller
« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2015, 01:22:42 AM »
You are at the mercy of the water temperature. It will go faster with colder water.

What you can do to help is to get a bigger immersion chiller (50 ft. of 1/2 inch), or the plate chiller. Surface are is an important part of the equation. Plate chillers have very large areas, and are counter flow by design.

Do you stir the wort while chilling? That will increase the heat transfer to the wort. I hope you are running the water fast enough to get turbulent flow >1 liter/minute.
Jeff Rankert
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
AHA Governing Committee
BJCP National
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline kbenton00

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 15
    • View Profile
Re: Plate Chiller
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2015, 03:06:27 PM »
I use the immersion chiller with a pump and a ice chest full of ice water.  It costs extra for the ice but at least I'm not dumping water straight down the drain (a consideration for those of us in California).  On my last batch I got the wort down to 80 in about 7 mimutes.

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk


Offline Indy574

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 147
    • View Profile
Re: Plate Chiller
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2015, 11:56:18 PM »
You are at the mercy of the water temperature. It will go faster with colder water.

What you can do to help is to get a bigger immersion chiller (50 ft. of 1/2 inch), or the plate chiller. Surface are is an important part of the equation. Plate chillers have very large areas, and are counter flow by design.

Do you stir the wort while chilling? That will increase the heat transfer to the wort. I hope you are running the water fast enough to get turbulent flow >1 liter/minute.

Yes I stir while I chill and flow is good. I may give a plate chiller a try.

Offline hopfenundmalz

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 9006
  • Milford, MI
    • View Profile
Re: Plate Chiller
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2015, 12:24:35 AM »
You are at the mercy of the water temperature. It will go faster with colder water.

What you can do to help is to get a bigger immersion chiller (50 ft. of 1/2 inch), or the plate chiller. Surface are is an important part of the equation. Plate chillers have very large areas, and are counter flow by design.

Do you stir the wort while chilling? That will increase the heat transfer to the wort. I hope you are running the water fast enough to get turbulent flow >1 liter/minute.

Yes I stir while I chill and flow is good. I may give a plate chiller a try.
Surface area is where plate chillers excel. So if you want to go that way, do it.
Jeff Rankert
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
AHA Governing Committee
BJCP National
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline brulosopher

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 505
  • They who drink beer will think beer
    • View Profile
    • Brülosophy
Plate Chiller
« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2015, 04:27:15 AM »
I went from IC to plate to CFC and finally back to IC. The key, as I later learned, is to run your source water at full blast and constantly move the IC around (or stir the wort). I go from boil to 6F above groundwater temp on a 5 gal batch in less than 5 minutes.

Offline hopfenundmalz

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 9006
  • Milford, MI
    • View Profile
Re: Plate Chiller
« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2015, 12:54:53 PM »
I went from IC to plate to CFC and finally back to IC. The key, as I later learned, is to run your source water at full blast and constantly move the IC around (or stir the wort). I go from boil to 6F above groundwater temp on a 5 gal batch in less than 5 minutes.
This is true. Running full on will give you more delta T across the chiller length, and the water comes out cooler, but it is taking more heat energy out, think M-dot*(Tout-Tin). The high Mass flow rate (M-dot) will carry the heat away.
Jeff Rankert
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
AHA Governing Committee
BJCP National
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline HoosierBrew

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 13030
  • Indianapolis,IN
    • View Profile
Re: Plate Chiller
« Reply #7 on: September 15, 2015, 01:01:09 PM »
I went from IC to plate to CFC and finally back to IC. The key, as I later learned, is to run your source water at full blast and constantly move the IC around (or stir the wort). I go from boil to 6F above groundwater temp on a 5 gal batch in less than 5 minutes.

+2
Jon H.

Offline pete b

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3123
  • Barre, Ma
    • View Profile
Re: Plate Chiller
« Reply #8 on: September 15, 2015, 02:08:31 PM »
I always recommend putting a chilling wand in the center of the IC coil and move the whole deal around a lot. I chill to 70's in about 10 minutes. YMMV, my water only gets up to 64 in the summer and my coil is 50' but it will definitely help and cheap.
A chilling wand is made of food grade plastic and is used in the foodservice industry to cool food fast:
http://www.webstaurantstore.com/san-jamar-rcu1282-rapi-kool-174-128-oz-rapid-cooling-paddle-2-pack/712RCU1282.html?utm_source=Google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=GoogleShopping&gclid=COPXs7ma-ccCFYGQHwodhtEBhg
Don't let the bastards cheer you up.

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 19928
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
Re: Plate Chiller
« Reply #9 on: September 15, 2015, 04:32:54 PM »
I went from IC to plate to CFC and finally back to IC. The key, as I later learned, is to run your source water at full blast and constantly move the IC around (or stir the wort). I go from boil to 6F above groundwater temp on a 5 gal batch in less than 5 minutes.

Or use a pump to do recirculated chilling with an IC.  That kinda stirs it automatically.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline BairsBrewing

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 101
    • View Profile
Re: Plate Chiller
« Reply #10 on: September 16, 2015, 05:46:48 AM »
If you know about glycol, have the ability to rig up a condensing unit, you can chill your wort rapidly using a plate chiller with no water, just glycol. I haven't done it yet but I may very soon just to prevent water waste. Its kinda like HVAC only using glycol not R22

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk

Offline brulosopher

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 505
  • They who drink beer will think beer
    • View Profile
    • Brülosophy
Re: Plate Chiller
« Reply #11 on: September 16, 2015, 12:20:53 PM »

I went from IC to plate to CFC and finally back to IC. The key, as I later learned, is to run your source water at full blast and constantly move the IC around (or stir the wort). I go from boil to 6F above groundwater temp on a 5 gal batch in less than 5 minutes.

Or use a pump to do recirculated chilling with an IC.  That kinda stirs it automatically.
I did that for a bit, still didn't like cleaning the pump... but when my arms stop working as well, that's what I'll do

Offline nicosan1

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 139
    • View Profile
Re: Plate Chiller
« Reply #12 on: September 16, 2015, 06:25:12 PM »
Okay this is very helpful, mainly I just need to change around my method of using my IC to better chill wort faster and then maybe make up the last few degrees in my keezer. My faucet moving at full blast does decently to get water in the IC.  I may look into a pump though soon as another option as well, maybe to recirculate.  Thank you all

Offline Indy574

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 147
    • View Profile
Re: Plate Chiller
« Reply #13 on: September 16, 2015, 09:35:49 PM »
Another option would to use a pump with a bath of ice water once the tap water starts to plato.

Offline Biran

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 90
    • View Profile
Re: Plate Chiller
« Reply #14 on: September 23, 2015, 07:51:13 PM »
This is true. Running full on will give you more delta T across the chiller length, and the water comes out cooler, but it is taking more heat energy out, think M-dot*(Tout-Tin). The high Mass flow rate (M-dot) will carry the heat away.

Shut up, Dr. Kallio, I already passed your thermodynamics class!!!

Sorry...PTSD flashback.

Anyway, good to know.  I heard somewhere to run the water through the IC slowly.  Next time I brew it is full blast.