Author Topic: Mash Temp & Time  (Read 1269 times)

Offline rebelbaserec

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Mash Temp & Time
« on: September 16, 2015, 09:25:34 PM »
I'm fairly new to all grain and after weeks of reading up on it, I've come across a few posts about mashing at higher or lower temps than what I typically mash at and leaving it for varying times.  I've always mashed at 152 for 60 min because that's all I've known.  Of all the homebrewing books, which which one goes the deepest into all these different times and temps?

Offline Stevie

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Mash Temp & Time
« Reply #1 on: September 16, 2015, 09:48:47 PM »
How to brew covers the various temps and the enzymes that a particular temp range supports.

Here is a great write up by Braukaiser on various mash parameters.

Forgot link - http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=Effects_of_mash_parameters_on_fermentability_and_efficiency_in_single_infusion_mashing
« Last Edit: September 17, 2015, 12:49:59 AM by Steve in TX »

Online dmtaylor

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Re: Mash Temp & Time
« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2015, 10:50:06 PM »
Most of the homebrewing books touch on mash temperatures a bit.  A couple of things worth mentioning:

1) Protein rests (around 110-122 F) can be harmful.  Since today's malts are so well modified, the protein rest actually destroys head and body rather than helping it.  Total opposite of what it did with the old malts from just 50-100 years ago.  But none of the homebrewing books will tell you this.  It's just something that people have learned in the past 5-10 years, and the books all have some catching up to do on this.  It's not opinion or theory as far as I'm concerned -- it's fact.

2) Step mashes and decoctions are fun to play around with, but after many years playing around, I've settled on a standard mash temp and time of 150 F for 40 minutes.  This simple schedule works great for 90% of beer styles.  And you'll probably find out the same thing yourself after you play around.  There's certainly nothing wrong with mashing at 152 F for 60 minutes all the time either!  Just a waste of 20 minutes if you ask me!  :)

But certainly, pick up a book, and/or read How To Brew or howtobrew.com, play around for a while, and learn from your own experience.  It's what we all do.  Find out what you like.  Have fun with it.
Dave

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Offline cascadesrunner

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Re: Mash Temp & Time
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2015, 01:10:48 AM »
I couldn't agree more with Dave's last bit there.  You'll find nuances specific to your set up and procedures.
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Mash Temp & Time
« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2015, 11:54:22 AM »
To add to what Dave said, there can be different mash time-temp proof piles for the malt you are using. British malt works in the 149-152F range. U.S. Malts are so enzyme rich they convert quickly, and go really fast at higher temps, 158F or so.
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Offline Pi

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Re: Mash Temp & Time
« Reply #5 on: September 21, 2015, 11:18:28 PM »
This simple schedule works great for 90% of beer styles. 
What are some of the 10% examples you would consider violating this?
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Online dmtaylor

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Re: Mash Temp & Time
« Reply #6 on: September 22, 2015, 01:29:56 AM »
This simple schedule works great for 90% of beer styles. 
What are some of the 10% examples you would consider violating this?

Good question.  Saison is an obvious one -- you typically want that style to be as dry as possible.  So mash low and slow, maybe 148 F for 90 minutes.  For a heavier style like a sweet stout, a short hot mash, maybe just 30 minutes at 156-158 F, should be plenty and will contribute to a sweet syrupy body, if that's what you want.  Conversely, if you don't like your imperial IPA finishing at 1.020, it's another style where you might want to do a nice long mash at 148 F for 90 minutes.  Also I've heard it said that when using dark Munich malt as the sole base malt, since it is lacking in enzymes due to the long high temp kilning of this particular malt, it is wise to do an extended mash.  So instead of just 40 or 60 minutes, consider doing 90 minutes or more for like the Munich dunkles style or something like that where you use >50% Munich malt.  But the same normal temperature of about 150 F is still fine, just need more time.  Or maybe kick that up to 152-154 F to help the enzymes do their thing.

In the end, it really just depends what you want.  90% of the time, if/when you don't really care much about body or just want it to turn out "normal", then 40 minutes at 150 F will get the job done.

Cheers!
Dave

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