Author Topic: Temperature Controller for full-size fridge  (Read 696 times)

Offline rebelbaserec

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Temperature Controller for full-size fridge
« on: September 24, 2015, 03:26:05 PM »
I have a regular, everyday fridge/freezer combo in my garage that I don't use and I'd like to use it for temp controlled fermenting.  Are there any plug-and-play (ready to use out of the box/no wiring) 2-stage (heating & cooling) controllers powerful enough for full size refrigerators?  Does anyone have experience with these inkbirds i see on amazon?  I saw a few mentions of them not being good for anything other than mini-fridges. 

Offline denny

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Re: Temperature Controller for full-size fridge
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2015, 04:00:10 PM »
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline rebelbaserec

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Re: Temperature Controller for full-size fridge
« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2015, 04:12:52 PM »
You use this on a full size?  I ask because the specs say the output is only 10A and I think most refrigerators are 15A.

Offline tesgüino

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Re: Temperature Controller for full-size fridge
« Reply #3 on: September 24, 2015, 04:17:10 PM »
You don't always need temperature control on a fridge. It'll make the freezer compartment useless. You should be able to get all you need from the existing control. Might take a little trial and error, but once you know what setting gives you what temperature, you'll be set. The plug and play units like Denny posted are more for converting freezers to work at the higher temperatures of fermenting and serving beer.
« Last Edit: September 24, 2015, 06:56:16 PM by tesgüino »

Offline denny

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Re: Temperature Controller for full-size fridge
« Reply #4 on: September 24, 2015, 04:35:52 PM »
You use this on a full size?  I ask because the specs say the output is only 10A and I think most refrigerators are 15A.

I use it on a chest freezer.  Even if the circuit your fridge is on is 15A, I doubt it really draws that much.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

RPIScotty

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Re: Temperature Controller for full-size fridge
« Reply #5 on: September 30, 2015, 10:14:54 AM »
You use this on a full size?  I ask because the specs say the output is only 10A and I think most refrigerators are 15A.

I use it on a chest freezer.  Even if the circuit your fridge is on is 15A, I doubt it really draws that much.

Refrigerators (unlike other appliances that actually draw higher currents) are typically on thier own circuit for isolation purposes, i.e. so as to not trip them in the event some other appliance on the same circuit trips.


Offline Werks21

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Re: Temperature Controller for full-size fridge
« Reply #7 on: October 09, 2015, 05:21:55 PM »
Refrigerators use less power than people think. Full size fridges use from 3 to 5 amps while running and about twice that while the compressor initially kicks on and comes up to speed. They are on their own 15 amp circuit, but in some homes (older) may not even receive the voltage required for 15 amps due to length or the run and gauge of the wire. (50 feet on a 14 gauge is max for 15 amps) The fact that there is not much leftover amperage as well as the overprotective nature of the NEC is why they don't put any other fixtures on the run.
Jonathan W.
Snohomish WA