Author Topic: Irish Dry Stout - Final recipe?  (Read 991 times)

Offline BrodyR

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Irish Dry Stout - Final recipe?
« on: October 05, 2015, 05:11:57 PM »
Alright, so I think I finalized an Irish Dry Stout recipe to try out this week - let me know if you guys would change anything:

Grain:
75% Marris Otter
15% Flaked Barley
10% Roasted Barley (I'm aiming for the high lovibond British stuff)

It sounds like theres really no need to add the roasted barley late if my pH is solid with it?

Hops:
Bittering with some hop shots I have in the fridge (I read that Guinness just uses a blend of high alpha American/Euro hops anyway). Targeting ~ 35 ibus for a 1.040 wort.

Water:
I'm going to shoot for 5.5-5.6 pH using a blend of R/O and Brita Filtered Tap Water. After a gram each of CaCL & Gypsum I should be around 50ppm Sulfate, 70 ppm Chloride

Yeast:
I'll build a starter with Irish Ale in the morning then pitch it late that evening or early next morning.

Planning to serve it on Nitro in the mid 40s

Offline gman23

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Re: Irish Dry Stout - Final recipe?
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2015, 05:21:01 PM »
The only thing I notice is that seems like a lot of IBUs for such a low OG. It looks like it is within style guidelines so I guess it's just me...
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Offline BrodyR

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Re: Irish Dry Stout - Final recipe?
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2015, 05:33:32 PM »
The only thing I notice is that seems like a lot of IBUs for such a low OG. It looks like it is within style guidelines so I guess it's just me...

Yea, interesting you say that. Initially I was targeting under 30, then I read that closer to a 1:1 IBUS:Gravity is normal with the style. May drop it to 30.

Offline kramerog

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Re: Irish Dry Stout - Final recipe?
« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2015, 05:35:43 PM »
I hear the attenuation of the Irish Ale yeast is low for dry stouts, which would be exacerbated by the use of Maris Otter as your only base malt.  I would mash at a low temp and possibly sub out some MO for 2 row.

If mash pH is OK then roasted barley can be in mash.  You may want to shoot for a higher mash pH than normal, say 5.6.

Offline gman23

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Re: Irish Dry Stout - Final recipe?
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2015, 05:42:43 PM »
The only thing I notice is that seems like a lot of IBUs for such a low OG. It looks like it is within style guidelines so I guess it's just me...

Yea, interesting you say that. Initially I was targeting under 30, then I read that closer to a 1:1 IBUS:Gravity is normal with the style. May drop it to 30.

Good to know. I am not very familiar with the style as far as brewing it is concerned...
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Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Irish Dry Stout - Final recipe?
« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2015, 05:58:48 PM »
I brewed a couple batches, a red and a stout, with 1084 and found it to behave much like 1056 just with a different flavor profile.

I think you're looking just fine. You mention guinness, but it doesnt sound like you are necessarily trying to clone it, right? So go for it. I wouldn't worry about MO not drying out. At 1.040 it starts to become less of a concern. Too dry and it will be watery.

Offline mabrungard

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Re: Irish Dry Stout - Final recipe?
« Reply #6 on: October 05, 2015, 07:04:29 PM »
This is actually a style that is well suited to using low alkalinity water and reserving the roast. Figure what to add to the main mash to produce a 5.3 to 5.4 mash pH and then add the roast at the end to drive the kettle wort pH lower. The style relies on the crispness of low pH to help accentuate the roast and contrast it to the raw barley flavor. Don't target a high pH for this style.
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Offline BrodyR

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Re: Irish Dry Stout - Final recipe?
« Reply #7 on: October 05, 2015, 07:09:58 PM »
This is actually a style that is well suited to using low alkalinity water and reserving the roast. Figure what to add to the main mash to produce a 5.3 to 5.4 mash pH and then add the roast at the end to drive the kettle wort pH lower. The style relies on the crispness of low pH to help accentuate the roast and contrast it to the raw barley flavor. Don't target a high pH for this style.

Very interesting. How long do you think I should let the roast malt mash?

Offline BrodyR

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Re: Irish Dry Stout - Final recipe?
« Reply #8 on: October 05, 2015, 07:11:27 PM »
I brewed a couple batches, a red and a stout, with 1084 and found it to behave much like 1056 just with a different flavor profile.

I think you're looking just fine. You mention guinness, but it doesnt sound like you are necessarily trying to clone it, right? So go for it. I wouldn't worry about MO not drying out. At 1.040 it starts to become less of a concern. Too dry and it will be watery.

Yea, I don't tend to have much attenuation problems since I usually brew low gravity.

Not exactly trying to clone (since this would require some sort of partial sour mash?) but making an Irish Dry Stout in it's style. My girlfriend loves Guinness so figured I'd try something similar.

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Re: Irish Dry Stout - Final recipe?
« Reply #9 on: October 05, 2015, 07:11:46 PM »
This is actually a style that is well suited to using low alkalinity water and reserving the roast. Figure what to add to the main mash to produce a 5.3 to 5.4 mash pH and then add the roast at the end to drive the kettle wort pH lower. The style relies on the crispness of low pH to help accentuate the roast and contrast it to the raw barley flavor. Don't target a high pH for this style.

Great advice
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Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Irish Dry Stout - Final recipe?
« Reply #10 on: October 05, 2015, 07:42:36 PM »
I brewed a couple batches, a red and a stout, with 1084 and found it to behave much like 1056 just with a different flavor profile.

I think you're looking just fine. You mention guinness, but it doesnt sound like you are necessarily trying to clone it, right? So go for it. I wouldn't worry about MO not drying out. At 1.040 it starts to become less of a concern. Too dry and it will be watery.

Yea, I don't tend to have much attenuation problems since I usually brew low gravity.

Not exactly trying to clone (since this would require some sort of partial sour mash?) but making an Irish Dry Stout in it's style. My girlfriend loves Guinness so figured I'd try something similar.
I've heard the sour mash thing. I've also heard that they throw in some spoiled beer from a previous batch. And I've heard its neither. I need to find a guiness and test a sample for ph. I'll bet its aboit 4.2 or 4.3, not any lower than a regular stout. But dont know till I try.

Offline BrodyR

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Re: Irish Dry Stout - Final recipe?
« Reply #11 on: October 05, 2015, 07:46:58 PM »
Testing the pH of Guinness is a good idea.

Offline blatz

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Re: Irish Dry Stout - Final recipe?
« Reply #12 on: October 05, 2015, 07:50:15 PM »
This is actually a style that is well suited to using low alkalinity water and reserving the roast. Figure what to add to the main mash to produce a 5.3 to 5.4 mash pH and then add the roast at the end to drive the kettle wort pH lower. The style relies on the crispness of low pH to help accentuate the roast and contrast it to the raw barley flavor. Don't target a high pH for this style.

Very interesting. How long do you think I should let the roast malt mash?

don't really need to mash the RB - just let it steep.  If you fly sparge, throw it in just before you begin sparging.  if you batch, I might add it the last 5 min before you start to vorlauf. 

alternatively, if you wanted, you could always use a muslin bag and steep.
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Offline Wort-H.O.G.

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Re: Irish Dry Stout - Final recipe?
« Reply #13 on: October 05, 2015, 07:57:31 PM »
Martin's advice is spot on as always- we talked about this on another thread earlier this year.

https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=23175.0
« Last Edit: October 05, 2015, 07:59:24 PM by Wort-H.O.G. »
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Offline kramerog

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Re: Irish Dry Stout - Final recipe?
« Reply #14 on: October 05, 2015, 09:17:14 PM »
This is actually a style that is well suited to using low alkalinity water and reserving the roast. Figure what to add to the main mash to produce a 5.3 to 5.4 mash pH and then add the roast at the end to drive the kettle wort pH lower. The style relies on the crispness of low pH to help accentuate the roast and contrast it to the raw barley flavor. Don't target a high pH for this style.

Agreed that a high mash pH does not make a Guinness clone.  I just don't care for Guinness.