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Author Topic: Step Mashing & Calculating Rest Times  (Read 5944 times)

Offline Kit B

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Re: Step Mashing & Calculating Rest Times
« Reply #30 on: October 07, 2015, 01:28:10 pm »
I think the main issue you may run into with the more complicated math (grain characteristics and their role) is this: as larger breweries move past this method and the homebrewing community gives up on it due to the lack of perceived benefit, your likely to find less and less information on the process.

Other than the basics of the method that are well documented. Good luck though.

I think you are absolutely correct, in this.
I have a feeling the math is embedded somewhere in a book by Ludwig NarziƟ.
Unfortunately, my high school German classes didn't teach me nearly enough to get through such detailed tech manuals.

RPIScotty

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Re: Step Mashing & Calculating Rest Times
« Reply #31 on: October 07, 2015, 01:45:43 pm »
I think most of the people you'll encounter feel the work involved outweighs the benefit.

Plain old step mashing is something I've tried a few times and it is easier, but again, the likelihood that I would ever taste a difference is minimal.


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Offline Kit B

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Re: Step Mashing & Calculating Rest Times
« Reply #32 on: October 07, 2015, 01:56:23 pm »
I think most of the people you'll encounter feel the work involved outweighs the benefit.

This is a very solid truth.

I really want to find someone that has the knowledge & is willing to share it.
No matter how many times I am told that the effort outweighs the fruits...
I still deeply believe that the payoff will be worth my time.
Besides...It's part of the fun, for me.
Building a basement brewroom is fun...
Automation is fun...
Electric brewing is fun...
Everyone has their own ideas of an enjoyable brew day.
Mine is different than most & involves what equates to a laboratory, when compared to some setups.
That's just part of who I have become & where I want to take my beers.
It's definitely not for everyone.

« Last Edit: October 07, 2015, 01:58:21 pm by Kit B »

Offline Stevie

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Step Mashing & Calculating Rest Times
« Reply #33 on: October 07, 2015, 02:34:04 pm »
Are you performing decotions electrically? If so, how are you boiling your thick mash? Hot plate with a heavy bottom pot?

Offline Kit B

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Re: Step Mashing & Calculating Rest Times
« Reply #34 on: October 07, 2015, 02:46:01 pm »
Are you performing decotions electrically? If so, how are you boiling your thick mash? Hot plate with a heavy bottom pot?

I have an induction cooktop & use a kettle with a 3-ply bottom.

S. cerevisiae

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Re: Step Mashing & Calculating Rest Times
« Reply #35 on: October 07, 2015, 02:56:51 pm »
OP:

Please take note of the difference in the pH levels that affect enzyme activity.  Eric, I, and few other members had a discussion a while ago about limit dextrinase, alpha amylase, and beta amylase.  Attempting to balance the needs of these enzymes is a rabbit hole down which few mortal men wish to proceed. :)


Offline denny

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Re: Step Mashing & Calculating Rest Times
« Reply #36 on: October 07, 2015, 03:03:23 pm »
My problem with that article is that it's all about math and nothing about flavor.  I don't know about the rest of you, but I drink a beer, not measure it.

Sure...I understand.
I'm merely hoping to get at nut of the science, by asking questions in a place where educated brewers hang out.
If I can't ask questions related to brewing science, on a forum of The American Homebrewers Association (which I support & advocate), where do I ask them?

You can certainly ask those questions here and I hope you don't ever feel like you can't.  But don't be surprised when these educated brewers delve into other aspects of the subject.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline Kit B

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Re: Step Mashing & Calculating Rest Times
« Reply #37 on: October 07, 2015, 03:07:22 pm »
OP:

Please take note of the difference in the pH levels that affect enzyme activity.  Eric, I, and few other members had a discussion a while ago about limit dextrinase, alpha amylase, and beta amylase.  Attempting to balance the needs of these enzymes is a rabbit hole down which few mortal men wish to proceed. :)

Yep...pH is being monitored quite closely, throughout.
Rabbit hole, indeed.

Offline denny

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Re: Step Mashing & Calculating Rest Times
« Reply #38 on: October 07, 2015, 03:11:49 pm »
Besides...It's part of the fun, for me.

That is the absolute best reason to do decoction mashes.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

rabeb25

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Re: Step Mashing & Calculating Rest Times
« Reply #39 on: October 07, 2015, 03:25:21 pm »
OP:

Please take note of the difference in the pH levels that affect enzyme activity.  Eric, I, and few other members had a discussion a while ago about limit dextrinase, alpha amylase, and beta amylase.  Attempting to balance the needs of these enzymes is a rabbit hole down which few mortal men wish to proceed. :)

Now you have piqued my interest, limit dextrinase is my flag word.

Offline brewcrew7

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Re: Step Mashing & Calculating Rest Times
« Reply #40 on: October 08, 2015, 08:29:53 am »
Check out this blog for some relevant information that you may find useful. Digging around for other posts may uncover more.

https://edelstoffquest.wordpress.com/2014/05/09/malt-modification-and-the-protease-rest/

Offline Kit B

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Re: Step Mashing & Calculating Rest Times
« Reply #41 on: October 08, 2015, 08:31:49 am »
Yep...Thanks...We've been in discussion, with the author of that blog, for a while & it's extremely enlightening.

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Step Mashing & Calculating Rest Times
« Reply #42 on: November 13, 2015, 05:10:43 am »
Can someone verify if I learned something from this thread? The hochkurz step mash is used to create a highly fermentable wort in the 140-145F Maltose rest, and the the higher temp 158-162F dextrin rest is used to further break down remaining starches into long chain sugars to build back the body that would otherwise be lacking. And... a low temp protein rest is not needed if the kobalch rate is high enough.

Yes? No? Maybe?

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Step Mashing & Calculating Rest Times
« Reply #43 on: November 13, 2015, 05:23:22 am »
Sounds right to me.
Dave

The world will become a much more pleasant place to live when each and every one of us realizes that we are all idiots.

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Step Mashing & Calculating Rest Times
« Reply #44 on: November 13, 2015, 05:53:02 am »
Sounds right to me.
Ok thanks. Was hoping I didn't completely misunderstand that science stuff.