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Author Topic: Step Mashing & Calculating Rest Times  (Read 5949 times)

Offline Kit B

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Re: Step Mashing & Calculating Rest Times
« Reply #45 on: November 13, 2015, 06:46:28 am »
A protein rest may not be necessary, but there are other benefits to other lower rest temperatures.


RPIScotty

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Re: Step Mashing & Calculating Rest Times
« Reply #46 on: November 13, 2015, 06:55:36 am »
A protein rest may not be necessary, but there are other benefits to other lower rest temperatures.

>=132 deg F seems to be a popular one, especially in the monasteries.

rabeb25

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Re: Step Mashing & Calculating Rest Times
« Reply #47 on: November 13, 2015, 07:08:01 am »
A protein rest may not be necessary, but there are other benefits to other lower rest temperatures.

>=132 deg F seems to be a popular one, especially in the monasteries.

Depends on kolbach+ protien % 130-135f.

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Step Mashing & Calculating Rest Times
« Reply #48 on: November 13, 2015, 04:06:05 pm »
A short rest - say 10 to 20 minutes - at 131-134ish will not hurt body or foam because it is out of the highly active range of peptidase, which breaks medium proteins into small proteins and amino acids. With continental Pilsner malt around a protein level of 10-10.5% and a kolbach index of 38-41, you may see a reduction in chill haze as well as better foam and body due to the activity of proteinase, which breaks large proteins (the ones that cause chill haze) into medium chain proteins.

I use a 10 minute rest at 131 and definitely see a reduction in chill haze vs when I don't. I know Gordon Strong does the same thing for the same reasons.

The only time a protein rest is not recommended is when the kolbach index is over 41. Most US and UK malts fall into this category.
Best says their pils kobalch is 36-45. Do you average that? Or do you have to know the number for your specific lot of malt?

Offline wobdee

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Re: Step Mashing & Calculating Rest Times
« Reply #49 on: November 14, 2015, 10:51:00 am »
A short rest - say 10 to 20 minutes - at 131-134ish will not hurt body or foam because it is out of the highly active range of peptidase, which breaks medium proteins into small proteins and amino acids. With continental Pilsner malt around a protein level of 10-10.5% and a kolbach index of 38-41, you may see a reduction in chill haze as well as better foam and body due to the activity of proteinase, which breaks large proteins (the ones that cause chill haze) into medium chain proteins.

I use a 10 minute rest at 131 and definitely see a reduction in chill haze vs when I don't. I know Gordon Strong does the same thing for the same reasons.

The only time a protein rest is not recommended is when the kolbach index is over 41. Most US and UK malts fall into this category.
Best says their pils kobalch is 36-45. Do you average that? Or do you have to know the number for your specific lot of malt?

When I contacted them about the need for a protein rest they said it wasn't needed for their Pils malt but if you have problems try doughing in low and immediately raise slowly to your first beta rest. This what I've been doing with good results.

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Step Mashing & Calculating Rest Times
« Reply #50 on: November 14, 2015, 04:00:56 pm »
A short rest - say 10 to 20 minutes - at 131-134ish will not hurt body or foam because it is out of the highly active range of peptidase, which breaks medium proteins into small proteins and amino acids. With continental Pilsner malt around a protein level of 10-10.5% and a kolbach index of 38-41, you may see a reduction in chill haze as well as better foam and body due to the activity of proteinase, which breaks large proteins (the ones that cause chill haze) into medium chain proteins.

I use a 10 minute rest at 131 and definitely see a reduction in chill haze vs when I don't. I know Gordon Strong does the same thing for the same reasons.

The only time a protein rest is not recommended is when the kolbach index is over 41. Most US and UK malts fall into this category.
Best says their pils kobalch is 36-45. Do you average that? Or do you have to know the number for your specific lot of malt?

When I contacted them about the need for a protein rest they said it wasn't needed for their Pils malt but if you have problems try doughing in low and immediately raise slowly to your first beta rest. This what I've been doing with good results.
Awesome thanks

Offline coolman26

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Re: Step Mashing & Calculating Rest Times
« Reply #51 on: November 15, 2015, 08:58:40 am »
A short rest - say 10 to 20 minutes - at 131-134ish will not hurt body or foam because it is out of the highly active range of peptidase, which breaks medium proteins into small proteins and amino acids. With continental Pilsner malt around a protein level of 10-10.5% and a kolbach index of 38-41, you may see a reduction in chill haze as well as better foam and body due to the activity of proteinase, which breaks large proteins (the ones that cause chill haze) into medium chain proteins.

I use a 10 minute rest at 131 and definitely see a reduction in chill haze vs when I don't. I know Gordon Strong does the same thing for the same reasons.

The only time a protein rest is not recommended is when the kolbach index is over 41. Most US and UK malts fall into this category.
Best says their pils kobalch is 36-45. Do you average that? Or do you have to know the number for your specific lot of malt?

When I contacted them about the need for a protein rest they said it wasn't needed for their Pils malt but if you have problems try doughing in low and immediately raise slowly to your first beta rest. This what I've been doing with good results.

What is your "dough in low" temp? 
Jeff B