Author Topic: Kegerator setup  (Read 1241 times)

Offline 57beers

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Kegerator setup
« on: October 08, 2015, 10:25:32 am »
Howdy.  Setting up my first kegerator and have questions regarding starting keg pressure and line length..  I live at 9700ft, my keg is approx 6ft below my tap, I'm using 3/16" ID Poly vinyl tubing.  At what pressure do I need to have my keg at to get the appropriate 2oz/second flow, and what length of tubing should I use?

Thanks!

Offline MarvinSwordenski

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Re: Kegerator setup
« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2015, 08:09:28 pm »
http://www.mikesoltys.com/2012/09/17/determining-proper-hose-length-for-your-kegerator/

I have this in my tool box.
Check out some calculators online. This doesn't take into account your elevation. Some searching may include this. Length of line is important for resistance.
Hope this get's you in the right direction.

Offline Werks21

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Re: Kegerator setup
« Reply #2 on: October 09, 2015, 10:52:26 am »
Getting your draft system dialed in isnt necessarily as easy a thing as some think. There are plenty of resources on line, like the calculator that MarvinS linked. Keep in mind that whatever you serve at will determing your carbonation level if left at that PSI when not serving. Most keggers keep there fridge at 38ish and set there pressure at about 11 or 12 and that gives beer the pretty standard carbonation level that is appropriate for most beers, 2.5 Vols Co2.
The calculator linked above says 5.6 feet of hose with out accounting for altitude. However your altitude means you have about 4.5 psi less pressure to begin with then those of us near sea level. That means that the the pressure differential you have at 12 PSI gauge would be about the same as me running 16.5 so when I put that into the calculator I get 8.33 Feet of 3/16 Bev tube needed.
If you start with 10 feet and chop it if/as need be you should have a nice flowing keg with minimal waste. Good luck.
Jonathan W.
Snohomish WA

Offline a10t2

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Re: Kegerator setup
« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2015, 11:10:45 am »
It's going to be really difficult to get a decent pour at 2 fl oz/sec. In a home setting I don't see any need to pour that quickly.

You'll need about 15 psig to carbonate to 2.5 vol, depending on temperature. -3 psi for the vertical run, -5 psi for the hardware, leaves ~7 psi for tubing drop. About 10 ft of 3/16" ID beverage line.

http://seanterrill.com/2011/11/11/a-more-accurate-approach-to-draft-system-balancing/
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Offline Werks21

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Re: Kegerator setup
« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2015, 11:55:14 am »
It's going to be really difficult to get a decent pour at 2 fl oz/sec. In a home setting I don't see any need to pour that quickly.

You'll need about 15 psig to carbonate to 2.5 vol, depending on temperature. -3 psi for the vertical run, -5 psi for the hardware, leaves ~7 psi for tubing drop. About 10 ft of 3/16" ID beverage line.

http://seanterrill.com/2011/11/11/a-more-accurate-approach-to-draft-system-balancing/

I suppose there is no need to pour fast though I usually do pour pretty fast. Not sure on the exact flow rate but I find that Part of your pour depends on what your beer is carbed at vs what is is serving at and what your pouring through. That is, I can pour a 8 PSI porter fast and a 12 psi Amber fast as long as their carbontation levels match the Co2 pressure applied and Im pouring through a Cobra head. My first foray into tap despensing (standard/el cheapo type) leads me to belive that my flow rate should be adjusted downward to maintain the pours I like. All that being said...
 When The pouring gets tough, I slow it down.
Jonathan W.
Snohomish WA