Author Topic: Reusable Borosilicate Screw Cap Glass Culture Tubes  (Read 10151 times)

S. cerevisiae

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Re: Reusable Borosilicate Screw Cap Glass Culture Tubes
« Reply #30 on: October 19, 2015, 02:47:38 pm »
This is cool. It seems like the only expensive item is the pressure cooker.  What is the minimum size pressure cooker that will suffice?

While I would like to own a nicer and larger pressure cooker, I have been using the same T-Fal 6qt pressure cooker for twenty-three years.

Quote
Regarding the pre-poured plates, do they need to be used relatively quickly or will they last for a while if properly stored?

You should be able to get around six months before the plates start to dry out if they are sealed with Parafilm and stored upside down.
« Last Edit: December 19, 2015, 06:12:14 pm by S. cerevisiae »

Offline Phil_M

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Re: Reusable Borosilicate Screw Cap Glass Culture Tubes
« Reply #31 on: October 19, 2015, 02:53:45 pm »
Mark, my big question isn't where to source things from, it's what do I really need, and how many do I need? I kit isn't necessary, and some guidelines for what is needed would be helpful.

It's clear I was off base on the number of culture tubes I'd want. How many media bottles/baby food bottles yould you recommend? Reusable plates?
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

S. cerevisiae

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Re: Reusable Borosilicate Screw Cap Glass Culture Tubes
« Reply #32 on: October 19, 2015, 04:26:24 pm »
You need more culture tubes than anything else because they are the workhorses of an amateur brewery culture collection.  Experience has taught me that the smallest number of culture tubes that a brewer should have is two dozen.  A bank that contains more than a couple of cultures will be difficult to maintain if one is forced to prepare less than a dozen blank slants at a time, and one should keep two inoculated slants per culture.

To be completely honest with you, borosilicate glass Petri dishes are nice to have around for those times when you are out of disposable presterlized dishes, but I guarantee that you will eventually switch to using disposable presterilized dishes after the newness of the hobby wears off. At most, you will need half a dozen borosilicate glass Petri dishes. 

If you are like me, you will probably pour half a dozen plates at a time, and end up throwing half away because you do not use them before they dry out. Your greatest plate usage will occur while establishing your bank because all of the cultures that are received in non-slant form will have to be plated for single colonies.  I own twelve Corning 3160-100 Petri dishes (I purchased a pack new), and every poured plate that is currently in my blank media storage container was prepared using a disposable presterilized Petri dish.  The difference in the amount of time that it takes to prepare plates in presterilized plastic dishes and glass dishes is like the difference between extract and all-grain time-wise.

You need at least one nichrome loop.  They last a long time in an amateur brewery, but they are cheap enough that you can afford to own a backup.

You only need one alcohol lamp.  You may or may not outgrow an alcohol lamp.  While I own a couple of Bunsen burners, I still use a flint glass alcohol lamp most of the time due to its portability and much less intense flame.  Some people are not patient enough to use an alcohol lamp.  The loop has to be placed in the tip of the inner cone of the flame until it turns red hot.  The flame on a Bunsen burner burns so much hotter that a loop turns red almost immediately after being placed in the inner cone, but it is also easier to burn oneself and burn one's house down with a propane-fired Bunsen burner.  I burn regular denatured alcohol in my lamp. Denatured alcohol is found in the paint section of most hardware stores, including Home Depot and Lowes.   An alcohol lamp will also burn 190 proof Everclear with a nice blue flame, but 190 proof Everclear is illegal in Maryland.


I purchased a 10-pack of Corning 1395-100 100ml media bottles.  I believe that the Kimble-Chase number for this size media bottle is KC14395100.  I prepare 8 media bottles at time because that is the limit of my 6L pressure cooker.  I will take me around six months to work my way through that many media bottles, but I am not going crazy with cultures.
« Last Edit: October 19, 2015, 06:40:30 pm by S. cerevisiae »

RPIScotty

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Re: Reusable Borosilicate Screw Cap Glass Culture Tubes
« Reply #33 on: October 19, 2015, 04:59:26 pm »
Thanks for sharing this info with us Mark.


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Offline dilluh98

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Re: Reusable Borosilicate Screw Cap Glass Culture Tubes
« Reply #34 on: October 20, 2015, 10:42:29 am »
This is cool. It seems like the only expensive item is the pressure cooker.  What is the minimum size pressure cooker that will suffice?

Regarding the pre-poured plates, do they need to be used relatively quickly or will they last for a while if properly stored?

I think more importantly than size, I've heard you want to look for an American made model that will easily reach autoclave conditions (preferably 15 psi for at least 15 min). They are more expensive but worth the price because they are incredibly well made and you are assured to reach the proper temp/pressure conditions for sterilization. Chinese made pressure cookers will barely get you there. 

Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Reusable Borosilicate Screw Cap Glass Culture Tubes
« Reply #35 on: October 21, 2015, 08:10:58 am »
Thought that you yeast guys might dig this:

https://flic.kr/p/zMeGfY

Hope it posts correctly....
Hodge Garage Brewing: "Brew with a glad heart!"

Offline Thirsty_Monk

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Re: Reusable Borosilicate Screw Cap Glass Culture Tubes
« Reply #36 on: October 21, 2015, 01:44:38 pm »

Thought that you yeast guys might dig this:

https://flic.kr/p/zMeGfY

Hope it posts correctly....
Cute
Na Zdravie

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http://www.lazymonkbrewing.com

S. cerevisiae

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Re: Reusable Borosilicate Screw Cap Glass Culture Tubes
« Reply #37 on: October 21, 2015, 02:57:41 pm »
I think more importantly than size, I've heard you want to look for an American made model that will easily reach autoclave conditions (preferably 15 psi for at least 15 min). They are more expensive but worth the price because they are incredibly well made and you are assured to reach the proper temp/pressure conditions for sterilization. Chinese made pressure cookers will barely get you there.

You are talking about the All American pressure canner/cookers.  The only thing that keeps me from purchasing one of those pressure cookers is that they get scungy looking due to being made out of cast aluminum.  It is merely an appearance thing, but I have a difficult time getting past it.

In practice, a 13PSI European standard pressure cooker will also work, but it extends the processing time to 25 minutes instead of 15 minutes. Thirteen PSI above normal atmospheric pressure delays boiling until water reaches 119C at sea level.  At 1000 feet of altitude, the processing time at 13PSI extends to 30 minutes.

From: www.fao.org/docrep/010/ai407e/ai407e22.htm



The piece of autoclave tape shown below was inside of my 23-year-old 6L T-Fal stainless steel pressure cooker (the tape was wrapped around one of my 100ml media bottles).  It is a European standard pressure cooker, which means that it only reaches 13PSI above atmospheric pressure.  Autoclave tape looks like funny looking masking tape before it is subjected to autoclaving.  The black lines form when the tape has been subjected to moist heat and pressure capable of sterilization.





The 15PSI for fifteen minutes rule only holds at elevations near sea level because autoclaving is altitude dependent.  In order to determine the processing time for one's altitude, one must first determine one's air pressure using this page: www.engineeringtoolbox.com/air-altitude-pressure-d_462.html

The next step is to determine the temperature at which water boils given one's air pressure and the pressure cooker PSI rating by adding the two values and looking up the temperature in Celsius on this page: www.engineeringtoolbox.com/boiling-point-water-d_926.html

The final step involves looking up the F-value in the F-value table associated with the temperature determined in the previous step, and then dividing 15 by that value.  The result is the number of minutes of processing time that is equal to autoclaving at 15PSI at sea level.

For those who want to how the 15PSI at 15 minutes rule evolved, well, it is the amount of time at 15PSI that it takes to kill Bacillus stearothermophilus spores.
« Last Edit: October 25, 2015, 07:51:29 pm by S. cerevisiae »

Offline Phil_M

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Re: Reusable Borosilicate Screw Cap Glass Culture Tubes
« Reply #38 on: October 21, 2015, 03:14:39 pm »
I don't know if this is the one Mark has, but so far it's the only pressure cooker I've seen that definitively states an ability to reach 15 PSI. Many of the other ones I've seen appear to reach 15 PSI, but don't explicitly state that they do.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00EXLOW38?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=ox_sc_sfl_title_1&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

S. cerevisiae

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Re: Reusable Borosilicate Screw Cap Glass Culture Tubes
« Reply #39 on: October 21, 2015, 07:07:03 pm »
The model that I own was phased out of production long ago.  The model that you have linked appears to have 10 and 15 PSI settings.   My pressure cooker is actually a made in France T-fal-branded SA SEB 6L LNOX Type 3215 (T-fal model number 33215), which is why it is a 13PSI pressure cooker.  It has a weight, but the weight spins instead of rocks.  From what I can ascertain, the SEB manufactured pressure cookers were the original Sensor series.  I purchased the model that I own because it was safer than the Presto pressure cookers that were sold during that point in time.  I need to purchase a backup gasket before they are no longer available.

Offline erockrph

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Re: Reusable Borosilicate Screw Cap Glass Culture Tubes
« Reply #40 on: October 29, 2015, 01:11:54 pm »
If you're price shopping, check out White Labs lab supplies section on yeastman.com  I can't speak to the quality as of yet, but I just placed an order from them for some pre-poured plates to play around with plating and isolating colonies from mixed cultures. Prices were in the range of $15 for a 10-pack depending on the specific media you get.
I got my White Labs shipment in a few days back and everything seemed to be good quality. All the plates looked to be in good shape and sealed with parafilm. When I went to plate some samples today, I found that they included a bonus mystery culture on one of the plates   :-\

Aside from that, I'm happy with the selection on yeastman.com and quality of everything else I received. I went the "sterile/disposable" route whenever possible on this shipment, since I'm not sure whether I'm in it for the long-term yet. Their 50mL screw-top vials are pretty handy, as are the 125 mL Nalgene bottles. I won't be using the disposable innoculation loops again, though. They had a tendency to dig into the agar on the plate instead of gliding over the top.

I'm going to be contacting White Labs customer service regarding the dirty plate and will report back when I get a response.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline erockrph

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Re: Reusable Borosilicate Screw Cap Glass Culture Tubes
« Reply #41 on: October 29, 2015, 01:12:56 pm »
The plate in question:

Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

S. cerevisiae

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Re: Reusable Borosilicate Screw Cap Glass Culture Tubes
« Reply #42 on: October 30, 2015, 07:44:03 am »
If the colonies are hemispherical and smooth, you received a bonus yeast culture.  If the colonies are fuzzy, they are more than likely mold.  Personally, I would take one of the well-isolated colonies, and grow it into a pitchable culture using aseptic technique to see what you received.  However, I am one of those people who is willing to spend good money on an unknown culture, and then pitch it into wort that took several hours to prepare.  No guts, no glory! :)

A nichrome loop and a flint glass alcohol lamp is a good investment.   An alcohol lamp is not as high tech as a Bunsen burner, but it gets the job done.  Plus, an alcohol lamp is self contained.   A little higher tech, but still self contained option is one of the refillable butane burners.  I have never used one, but they look cool.  I own two propane Bunsen burners.  I assembled my own regulator using a low pressure regulator for table top propane stoves and a 1/8" NPT x 5/16" barb fitting.  Both of these burners collect dust because I prefer to use an alcohol lamp.  I used a pressurized loop-style alcohol lamp for while, but the flame burns with an impossible to see in a brightly-lit room blue flame once it comes to operating temperature.

S. cerevisiae

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Re: Reusable Borosilicate Screw Cap Glass Culture Tubes
« Reply #43 on: October 30, 2015, 07:46:27 am »
By the way, I thought that the yeastman website was only available to professional brewers.

Offline erockrph

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Re: Reusable Borosilicate Screw Cap Glass Culture Tubes
« Reply #44 on: October 30, 2015, 08:10:06 am »
By the way, I thought that the yeastman website was only available to professional brewers.
Nope. Anyone can set up an account and start using it right away.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer