Author Topic: cold crashing  (Read 1115 times)

Offline wvmtneer

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cold crashing
« on: October 10, 2015, 08:06:24 PM »
What is the proper way to do this technique?  Does the technique change if you use a conical fermenter?

Offline tommymorris

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cold crashing
« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2015, 08:14:04 PM »
I just set the temp on my chest freezer to 32-34F and come back a few days later to keg the beer.

Some folks drop the temp slower, a few degrees per day.

You should replace the airlock with a plug (I use a non-drilled carboy bung) to stop liquid in the airlock from being sucked into the fermenter during cooling.

I don't know the answer about special considerations for conical fermenters.

Offline brewday

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2015, 08:43:42 PM »
Yep, I set to 32F and keg after a couple of days.  I have a conical and don't get any of the airlock suck-back that I get when I use a better bottle.
Jon Weaver

Offline wvmtneer

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2015, 09:21:56 PM »
Yep, I set to 32F and keg after a couple of days.  I have a conical and don't get any of the airlock suck-back that I get when I use a better bottle.
So when you do this with your conical do drain the sediment before cold crashing or after?

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Offline brewday

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2015, 10:09:05 PM »
Yep, I set to 32F and keg after a couple of days.  I have a conical and don't get any of the airlock suck-back that I get when I use a better bottle.
So when you do this with your conical do drain the sediment before cold crashing or after?

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After - I dump yeast/trub/dry hops just prior to kegging.  A half gallon mason jar seems to work well for this.  My conical is 7 gallons.
Jon Weaver

Offline wvmtneer

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #5 on: October 10, 2015, 10:12:58 PM »
Yep, I set to 32F and keg after a couple of days.  I have a conical and don't get any of the airlock suck-back that I get when I use a better bottle.
So when you do this with your conical do drain the sediment before cold crashing or after?

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After - I dump yeast/trub/dry hops just prior to kegging.  A half gallon mason jar seems to work well for this.  My conical is 7 gallons.
That's what I have as well 7 gallon. I will just be doing 5 gallon batches once I get up and rolling. Do you change to a solid bung in the airlock before cold crashing?

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Offline brewday

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #6 on: October 10, 2015, 10:19:43 PM »
I just keep the airlock in place when crashing.
Jon Weaver

Offline wvmtneer

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #7 on: October 10, 2015, 10:23:48 PM »
I just keep the airlock in place when crashing.
You've never had any issues with it draining into the fermenter when cold crashed like some have had?

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Offline brewday

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #8 on: October 10, 2015, 10:32:46 PM »
I just keep the airlock in place when crashing.
You've never had any issues with it draining into the fermenter when cold crashed like some have had?

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Not with the conical, but other types of vessels yes.  Regardless I think the amount is insignificant.
Jon Weaver

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #9 on: October 10, 2015, 10:33:56 PM »
I used to crash in the fermenter with an airlock but have switched to crashing in the keg under pressure. Although I noticed the suck back into the fermenter, I never noticed any oxidation on my beers. My theory was always that the CO2 in the fermenter provided a blanket over the beer, keeping the air from being an issue. Regardless, by crashing in keg under pressure I have no worries. 30-32F for 2 or 3 days.
Jon H.

Offline wvmtneer

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #10 on: October 10, 2015, 10:34:32 PM »
I just keep the airlock in place when crashing.
You've never had any issues with it draining into the fermenter when cold crashed like some have had?

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Not with the conical, but other types of vessels yes.  Regardless I think the amount is insignificant.
Thanks

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Offline wvmtneer

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #11 on: October 10, 2015, 10:41:04 PM »
I used to crash in the fermenter with an airlock but have switched to crashing in the keg under pressure. Although I noticed the suck back into the fermenter, I never noticed any oxidation on my beers. My theory was always that the CO2 in the fermenter provided a blanket over the beer, keeping the air from being an issue. Regardless, by crashing in keg under pressure I have no worries. 30-32F for 2 or 3 days.
I don't understand, I thought the purpose of cold crashing was to get all the yeast and other particles to settle to the bottmom to clear up the beer. By putting it in a keg and cold crashing wouldn't that draw straight from the bottom and defeat the purpose?

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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #12 on: October 10, 2015, 10:50:39 PM »
I give most beer styles long enough in the fermenter to sediment the vast majority of yeast/trub. What's left to sediment in most cases is only a tiny layer of yeast which is drawn out in the first pint or less. I just like limiting O2 exposure any way possible, and I can start carbing as I do this as well. Lots of ways to do things is the theme here.
Jon H.

Offline wvmtneer

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #13 on: October 10, 2015, 11:03:56 PM »
I give most beer styles long enough in the fermenter to sediment the vast majority of yeast/trub. What's left to sediment in most cases is only a tiny layer of yeast which is drawn out in the first pint or less. I just like limiting O2 exposure any way possible, and I can start carbing as I do this as well. Lots of ways to do things is the theme here.
Ok, makes sense, I'm new to all this and I'm trying to get all this stuff straight in my head. I  appreciate the answer!

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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: cold crashing
« Reply #14 on: October 10, 2015, 11:05:17 PM »
I give most beer styles long enough in the fermenter to sediment the vast majority of yeast/trub. What's left to sediment in most cases is only a tiny layer of yeast which is drawn out in the first pint or less. I just like limiting O2 exposure any way possible, and I can start carbing as I do this as well. Lots of ways to do things is the theme here.
Ok, makes sense, I'm new to all this and I'm trying to get all this stuff straight in my head. I  appreciate the answer!

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No problem, we're happy to help anytime. Good luck and welcome by the way !
Jon H.