Author Topic: Bell's Two Hearted yeast question  (Read 1519 times)

Offline smalloy88

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Bell's Two Hearted yeast question
« on: October 12, 2015, 11:10:32 PM »
I brewed a 10 gal batch this weekend of the following clone recipe...

https://www.brewtoad.com/recipes/bells-two-hearted-ale-10-gal

The brewer seems like he knows his stuff from all of his recipes and brew logs on brewtoad, so I didn't question it.  Now I'm questioning the Belgian Abbey yeast that he used in his recipe.  I already have 10 gallons of this stuff fermenting and didn't question the yeast until now  :-\.  His brew logs say his final product was very close to the actual Two Hearted.  Do you guys think there's any way of getting the two hearted taste with this strain of yeast?  I'm worried mine is going to turn out as more of a belgian IPA (I've never used this yeast, so I'm not sure what to expect).  What do you guys think?
« Last Edit: October 12, 2015, 11:15:36 PM by smalloy88 »
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Bell's Two Hearted yeast question
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2015, 11:19:47 PM »
This is from Bell's. They use a house yeast that is a little estery. I have not used the Abbey yeast. Two Hearted clones with the Chico Yeast (1056,001, US-05) turn out pretty good, but the house yeast has a little more mouthfeel and character.

More dry hops are needed, one oz. is not enough.

http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/homebrew-recipe/bells-two-hearted-ale-clone/
« Last Edit: October 12, 2015, 11:21:49 PM by hopfenundmalz »
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Offline smalloy88

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Re: Bell's Two Hearted yeast question
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2015, 11:25:19 PM »
In hindsight, I should've used a more credible recipe.  Do you think there's any chance this one comes close with the belgian abbey yeast?
« Last Edit: October 12, 2015, 11:29:12 PM by smalloy88 »
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Bell's Two Hearted yeast question
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2015, 11:48:51 PM »
In hindsight, I should've used a more credible recipe.  Do you think there's any chance this one comes close with the belgian abbey yeast?
if you have that yeast and don't have time to get another, ferment around 65F, ramp up at the end.

You can then judge how it turns out, if you can find Two Hearted in your area, drink those side by side.
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Offline smalloy88

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Re: Bell's Two Hearted yeast question
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2015, 11:51:54 PM »
Thanks, Jeff.  It's been fermenting with the Belgian yeast for ~15 hours.  It's right around 65; I'll ramp up like you said and let you know how it turns out.
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Bell's Two Hearted yeast question
« Reply #5 on: October 13, 2015, 12:27:37 AM »
Leave it at 65 a little linger, take it up to 68 or 70 to finish.
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Offline smalloy88

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Re: Bell's Two Hearted yeast question
« Reply #6 on: October 13, 2015, 12:31:24 AM »
Wyeast lists the temperature range for that strain as 68-78.  Will 65 stall out the fermentation?
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Bell's Two Hearted yeast question
« Reply #7 on: October 13, 2015, 01:41:48 AM »
Wyeast lists the temperature range for that strain as 68-78.  Will 65 stall out the fermentation?
Start a little higher then and go up in temp. The first day produces the most yeast character.
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Offline a10t2

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Re: Bell's Two Hearted yeast question
« Reply #8 on: October 13, 2015, 04:52:05 PM »
The suggested temperature ranges are just that: suggestions. In this case,  I'd ferment as cool as possible for the first couple days. Definitely no warmer than 65°F since it's fermenting there.

1272 or 1450 would be good for a Bell's clone.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2015, 04:54:03 PM by a10t2 »
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Re: Bell's Two Hearted yeast question
« Reply #9 on: October 13, 2015, 05:04:15 PM »
Do you guys think there's any way of getting the two hearted taste with this strain of yeast?

Nope.  That's what's puzzling - if it were meant as a Belgian IPA, fine. But for the guy to call it a Two-Hearted clone but use 1214 is a head scratcher. Having said that, if you can keep fermentation temps from getting too high it should be pretty solid. Let us know how it comes out !
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Bell's Two Hearted yeast question
« Reply #10 on: October 13, 2015, 06:01:10 PM »
The suggested temperature ranges are just that: suggestions. In this case,  I'd ferment as cool as possible for the first couple days. Definitely no warmer than 65°F since it's fermenting there.

1272 or 1450 would be good for a Bell's clone.
Bells has more mouthfeel than Chico, and Bell's makes some nice citrusy/orangey esters if you ferment it warm. A friend at the brewery says they ferment it warmer than many would think, but they also can do that with 400 and 800 bbl fermenters I the tank farm.


I did a beer that used an Oberon clone for the base beer the Bell's yeast at 68F pitch up to 70F, and Mandarina in place of the Saaz in Oberon. It is very orangey, no slice of fruit needed.
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Offline smalloy88

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Re: Bell's Two Hearted yeast question
« Reply #11 on: October 14, 2015, 02:15:49 AM »
Sounds good.  Thanks for the feedback guys.  I don't think I'll ever know why he chose that strain (or why I never questioned it until after pitching). 

I'm going to go with a normal dry hopping schedule as I would with a normal IPA.  Primary > cold crash few days > rack onto dry hops for a few days > cold crash few days > transfer to keg and carbonate.

Do you guys think I have to age it as I would a belgian IPA before transferring to kegs?  I'm looking for more of an IPA flavor than a white or blonde flavor.  Would kegging it earlier, as opposed to aging, prevent the presence of the belgian flavors?
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Bell's Two Hearted yeast question
« Reply #12 on: October 14, 2015, 02:28:57 AM »
Dry hop with a boat load of Centennial. That is all I've got at this point!
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Offline smalloy88

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Re: Bell's Two Hearted yeast question
« Reply #13 on: October 14, 2015, 02:36:25 AM »
Right now I have 1 oz per 5 gallons.  Should I bump it up to 3 oz per 5 gallons?
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Bell's Two Hearted yeast question
« Reply #14 on: October 14, 2015, 02:42:17 AM »
Right now I have 1 oz per 5 gallons.  Should I bump it up to 3 oz per 5 gallons?
Why not. two hearted has a great floral note when fresh.

I think they added a lot of those 22 lb bags to the fermenter, it is 400 bbl. Count the bags around the fermenter at the beginning. Using the Homebrew recipe that is about 20 to 21 of those bags, video was edited as not to be boring.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=FRkbUj3oldo

« Last Edit: October 14, 2015, 02:46:23 AM by hopfenundmalz »
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