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Author Topic: The Mash: High vs. Low Temperature | exBEERiment Results!  (Read 7637 times)

narvin

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Re: The Mash: High vs. Low Temperature | exBEERiment Results!
« Reply #30 on: October 14, 2015, 06:40:28 am »
Remember to check your munich malt before assuming anything about its modification.  Best Malz munich is pretty well modified.


Offline erockrph

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Re: The Mash: High vs. Low Temperature | exBEERiment Results!
« Reply #31 on: October 14, 2015, 09:24:13 am »
Remember to check your munich malt before assuming anything about its modification.  Best Malz munich is pretty well modified.
Fair enough, although that may still be a good example. A "Pale Ale" kilned heirloom UK varietal may be a better example for what I was trying to get at.

I guess the TL;DR of my previous post is that if a malt has a higher alpha amylase content then it can tolerate a higher mash temperature and/or longer mash, yet still retain some alpha amylase activity by the end of the mash.

This probably explains why there is data showing peak fermentability from mashes in the mid-150's, rather the 140's as we'd typically expect. If your malt is hot enough, then you can push your mash further into beta range before you lose the bulk of your alpha activity.  Your main variables are the half-life of the reaction that denatures your alpha amylase, and the amount of alpha present in the mash.
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Offline denny

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Re: The Mash: High vs. Low Temperature | exBEERiment Results!
« Reply #32 on: October 14, 2015, 10:23:25 am »
Greg Doss of Wyeast gave a talk at NHC 2012 in Seattle about mash temp vs. fermentability vs. yeast strain and showed some surprising results.  If you're a member, I recommend you check it out.
I believe he recommended 153F as optimal, no?

Thinks so, but I'd have to check.  IIRC, it was also strain dependent.
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Offline denny

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Re: The Mash: High vs. Low Temperature | exBEERiment Results!
« Reply #33 on: October 14, 2015, 10:24:24 am »
Remember to check your munich malt before assuming anything about its modification.  Best Malz munich is pretty well modified.


[/quote

I was about to say the same thing!  I have no problems with conversion or attenuation with Best Munich, even in an all Munich beer.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline toby

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Re: The Mash: High vs. Low Temperature | exBEERiment Results!
« Reply #34 on: October 19, 2015, 08:29:27 am »
I was about to say the same thing!  I have no problems with conversion or attenuation with Best Munich, even in an all Munich beer.

I love using their Pils malt for the same reason.