Author Topic: WY1028 and Sulphur  (Read 970 times)

Offline Stevie

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WY1028 and Sulphur
« on: October 19, 2015, 04:25:37 PM »
I haven't used this strain in years and the last time was pre-ferm freezer. I opened the lid this morning to a bit of sulphur. Not as bad as I have smelled from friends 34/70 fermentations, but it's noticeable. I'd rate it at the level of fresh hard boiled eggs, noticeable but not off putting.

I'm not concerned about it as I am only two days in, but I wanted to see if others noted the smell before.

Offline neddles

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Re: WY1028 and Sulphur
« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2015, 02:13:21 AM »
I've used it a few times and never got any sulphur from 1028. Now 2142/2308/3068 are another story. But H2S has just dissipated given time for me.

Offline stpug

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Re: WY1028 and Sulphur
« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2015, 02:27:27 PM »
Used it a few times and never the sulphur aroma.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: WY1028 and Sulphur
« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2015, 02:30:59 PM »
I haven't used it in a while but I don't remember getting sulfur with it. It should dissipate in a week or two, though.
Jon H.

Offline Stevie

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Re: WY1028 and Sulphur
« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2015, 02:34:49 PM »
Yeah, I'm not worried, just curious if others had noticed it in the past.

Offline brewinhard

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Re: WY1028 and Sulphur
« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2015, 10:22:33 PM »
Just finished up two brews with this one (special bitter/old ale) and did not notice any sulfur production.  What temps did you notice it at?

Offline Stevie

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Re: WY1028 and Sulphur
« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2015, 10:43:23 PM »
68° for three days and now slowly raising to 72°. It's faded but I haven't pulled a sample to taste. Like I said, it wasn't strong, but it was there. I'll pull a sample Saturday, hell I might even keg it Saturday if it tastes good (7 days). Activity has died way down and it is starting to floc.

I might be a Mark V convert. Shh, don't tell him.

Offline brewinhard

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Re: WY1028 and Sulphur
« Reply #7 on: October 21, 2015, 11:01:52 PM »
That was pretty much my ferm profile as well (although I started my old ale at 65F for a couple days to control the higher fusel alcohol production).  I have always wondered if sulfur production is a result of stressed cells?

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: WY1028 and Sulphur
« Reply #8 on: October 21, 2015, 11:17:27 PM »
I have always wondered if sulfur production is a result of stressed cells?

There supposedly is a link between sulfur in beer and lack of contact with copper. I've always used a copper IC and (except for hefe, wit and a few lager strains) I never get any sulfur. What sulfur I do get from these strains always dissipates in a week or two. I've heard that you can test this out by stirring a sulfur-y beer with a short piece of copper tubing, and the sulfur disappears. As for stressed yeast causing sulfur I've heard that to be the case - don't know to what extent or scenario.
Jon H.

Offline Stevie

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WY1028 and Sulphur
« Reply #9 on: October 21, 2015, 11:19:09 PM »
Going off of Mark's method, yeast should not have been stressed. I have a copper chiller and it lives in the kettle for the entire boil.

I have come across posts on other forums that basically read the same. OP says he/she got sulfur, replies all say nope.
« Last Edit: October 21, 2015, 11:24:34 PM by Steve in TX »

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: WY1028 and Sulphur
« Reply #10 on: October 21, 2015, 11:24:06 PM »
Going off of Mark's method, yeast should not have been stressed. I have a copper chiller and it lives in the kettle for the entire boil.

Figured you did. Honestly, thinking back, I think the last time I used 1028 was on a RIS (I like it for porter and stout), and the beer stayed in primary for a solid month - so any sulfur would've been gone by then. Don't remember it prior to that. For 2 or 3 years though I've been using 1450 for brown, porter and stout so it's been a while since I used 1028 very often.
Jon H.

Offline Stevie

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Re: WY1028 and Sulphur
« Reply #11 on: October 22, 2015, 03:58:29 PM »
Pulled a sample and it seems to be done at 83% ADF. Can't pickup any sulphur in the nose, maybe a touch in the flavor. Super hazy which was expected with this yeast, so that might be jacking with my perception. Going to start crashing on Saturday and will keg Monday or Tuesday with gelatin to fine.

The beer is pretty boring which I guess I expected considering it is a New Albion based Cascade/2-row smash. I think I should throw an ounce of Cascade in the fermenter when I go to crash.

S. cerevisiae

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Re: WY1028 and Sulphur
« Reply #12 on: October 22, 2015, 05:49:06 PM »
Wyeast 1028 is a Burton strain.  Burton strains are famous for producing sulfur.  Did you add a lot of sulfate to the water?

Offline Stevie

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Re: WY1028 and Sulphur
« Reply #13 on: October 22, 2015, 06:11:13 PM »
Not a crazy amount. Worked off of Martin's yellow balanced. 75ppm. Maybe I'll rebrew and go with the full profile to compare.

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Re: WY1028 and Sulphur
« Reply #14 on: October 22, 2015, 07:35:53 PM »
You should get even more sulfur as you increase the sulphate content.  It is referred to as the "Burton snatch."
Wyeast 1028 is Worthington's primary strain.  It was selected using the union system, which is why it is so powdery.