Author Topic: How's my tap water look for this?  (Read 747 times)

Offline BrodyR

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How's my tap water look for this?
« on: October 29, 2015, 03:30:20 AM »
As I've referenced in a few posts lately I've been frustrated with lower than predicted mash pH's lately, probably linked to my switch from distilled to grocery store RO water for cutting my tap water. Tomorrow I'm going to brew a sorta-stout - 75% Breiss 2 Row, 15% flaked oats, 10% 500l debittered black malt (I presume caraffa III special or midnight wheat...guy at the shop didn't know). My thought was to try 100% tap water, unfiltered with just a campden tablet. I'll treat with lactic acid or baking soda (or maybe Chalk since I could use more calcium and have a decent bit of sodium already) if need be to hit a mash pH of 5.5-5.6. Flavor wise my goal is to brew a smooth, creamy, clean stout with some chocolate notes but as little harshness as possible.

But anyway, I wanted to see if you guys think my tap will be decent for this style or if I should dilute/add some minerals?

Ca: 43 (a bit low... but maybe workable?)
Mg: 13
Na: 42 (a little high?)
S04: 44
Cl: 92

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: How's my tap water look for this?
« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2015, 04:59:18 AM »
What is the HCO3 ppm?

Chalk won't raise the pH much, as it takes a long time to dissolve.
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Offline beersk

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Re: How's my tap water look for this?
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2015, 01:44:52 PM »
I wouldn't worry about the lower calcium or the higher sodium. The sodium will actually add to the flava flave of the beer. But if you add baking soda to raise the pH, it might raise that sodium level a little higher than ideal, but I don't think it'd be a problem as long as it's below like 75ppm maybe. Martin might have some better info on sodium.
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Offline BrodyR

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Re: How's my tap water look for this?
« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2015, 01:45:09 PM »
What is the HCO3 ppm?

Chalk won't raise the pH much, as it takes a long time to dissolve.

87: yea, I switched over to baking soda since it sounds like a better/more efficient practice although in the past when I've used Chalk it it did do the trick, my guess is not as effectively though.

Although I may not need it, Brun Water is estimating a pH of 5.7, if it hits that I'll adjust downward with 88% lactic. I'm gonna hold off on any additions until my first reading since I still don't know why my waters been off lately.

Offline BrodyR

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Re: How's my tap water look for this?
« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2015, 03:44:12 PM »
Stuck with the plan and mashed in - Brun Water target pH was dead on the money, guess that means the issue wasn't a change in my tap water but rather the use of a Brita was impacting the pH or the RO water I was buying was lowering the pH.

Offline narcout

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Re: How's my tap water look for this?
« Reply #5 on: October 29, 2015, 04:20:28 PM »
10% 500l debittered black malt (I presume caraffa III special or midnight wheat...guy at the shop didn't know).

Midnight wheat is huskless, so the term "debittered" isn't really applicable (same with Blackprinz by the way). 
It's too close to home
And it's too near the bone

Offline BrodyR

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Re: How's my tap water look for this?
« Reply #6 on: October 29, 2015, 05:33:26 PM »
10% 500l debittered black malt (I presume caraffa III special or midnight wheat...guy at the shop didn't know).

Midnight wheat is huskless, so the term "debittered" isn't really applicable (same with Blackprinz by the way).

Yea, it's how they market it though. I'm thinking it's black prinz since the shop carries a lot of breiss and the 500l lines up.

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Re: How's my tap water look for this?
« Reply #7 on: October 29, 2015, 05:43:40 PM »
10% 500l debittered black malt (I presume caraffa III special or midnight wheat...guy at the shop didn't know).

Midnight wheat is huskless, so the term "debittered" isn't really applicable (same with Blackprinz by the way).

Huskless and De-Bittered are the same thing.

Offline narcout

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Re: How's my tap water look for this?
« Reply #8 on: October 29, 2015, 06:02:08 PM »
Huskless and De-Bittered are the same thing.

Huskless means made from grains with no husk (like Blackprinz, which is made from a hulless barley). 

Debitterred means that some of the husks have been removed (though some remain; I can't remember the percentage the guy from Briess quoted during his NHC presentation).
It's too close to home
And it's too near the bone

RPIScotty

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Re: How's my tap water look for this?
« Reply #9 on: October 29, 2015, 06:12:20 PM »
Huskless and De-Bittered are the same thing.

Huskless means made from grains with no husk (like Blackprinz, which is made from a hulless barley). 

Debitterred means that some of the husks have been removed (though some remain; I can't remember the percentage the guy from Briess quoted during his NHC presentation).

It's semantics. De-Bittered = Mostly De-Husked prior to kilning = ~Huskless. I doubt there is any real difference in the final product other than marketing jargon from Briess.

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: How's my tap water look for this?
« Reply #10 on: October 30, 2015, 02:13:09 AM »
Huskless and De-Bittered are the same thing.

Huskless means made from grains with no husk (like Blackprinz, which is made from a hulless barley). 

Debitterred means that some of the husks have been removed (though some remain; I can't remember the percentage the guy from Briess quoted during his NHC presentation).

It's semantics. De-Bittered = Mostly De-Husked prior to kilning = ~Huskless. I doubt there is any real difference in the final product other than marketing jargon from Briess.
At the NHC the guy from Breiss said that the dehusked still has about 40% of the husk left. Wheat is a naked grain, so no husk.
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Offline BrodyR

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Re: How's my tap water look for this?
« Reply #11 on: October 30, 2015, 03:32:11 AM »
Huskless and De-Bittered are the same thing.

Huskless means made from grains with no husk (like Blackprinz, which is made from a hulless barley). 

Debitterred means that some of the husks have been removed (though some remain; I can't remember the percentage the guy from Briess quoted during his NHC presentation).

It's semantics. De-Bittered = Mostly De-Husked prior to kilning = ~Huskless. I doubt there is any real difference in the final product other than marketing jargon from Briess.
At the NHC the guy from Breiss said that the dehusked still has about 40% of the husk left. Wheat is a naked grain, so no husk.

Good to know - A good parallel seems to be whole wheat flour (husk, endosperm, + germ all milled) vs white flour (dehusked with most of germ removed too) with midnight wheat being the white flour.

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Re: How's my tap water look for this?
« Reply #12 on: October 30, 2015, 10:30:53 AM »
At the NHC the guy from Breiss said that the dehusked still has about 40% of the husk left. Wheat is a naked grain, so no husk.

I stand corrected. I was under the impression that more of the husk was removed. It could vary from maltster to maltster as well but If a company as big as Briess is removing that amount I would assume that it is some sort of industry standard.