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Author Topic: Single-hopped beers 2015 edition  (Read 6293 times)

Offline homebrew212

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Re: Single-hopped beers 2015 edition
« Reply #15 on: November 02, 2015, 06:27:31 am »
Thanks! Is this for a 10 gal. batch?

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Single-hopped beers 2015 edition
« Reply #16 on: November 02, 2015, 06:32:20 am »
Thanks! Is this for a 10 gal. batch?

Sorry - 5 gallons.  It's early.
Jon H.

Offline erockrph

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Re: Single-hopped beers 2015 edition
« Reply #17 on: November 28, 2015, 09:27:15 am »
It took a bit longer than I had hoped to carve out the time for it, but I finally got around to bottling these batches last night. I used a new method to bottle these rather than just tring to bottle straight from the fermenter. I used a keg as a bottling bucket and bottled from there. It saved me a little time, but it payed huge dividends in making my life a lot easier (and my kitchen a lot cleaner). I just racked a batch into a sanitized keg, then bottled under low CO2 pressure and added 1 Cooper's carb drop per usual before capping. After a quick hot water rinse and re-sanitization, I was ready for the next batch. Really simple, and even better than using a standard bottling bucket since you don't lose much beer in the keg, and you can just line up all the bottles in the sink and bottle a whole batch in minutes.

If these beers taste anywhere near as good as they smell, then there are several varieties that will probably make my regular rotation. I won't name any names until I taste the finished beer, but one of these has the potential to replace Citra as my go-to base hop for fruit-forward hoppy beers. I'll let that hang out there as a tease for now  ;D

I'll be back in 2-3 weeks with my results once these finish carbing up.
Eric B.

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Offline homoeccentricus

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Re: Single-hopped beers 2015 edition
« Reply #18 on: November 28, 2015, 09:58:35 am »
Aha interesting method, want to try that too. How do you switch from one bottle to the next without spilling?
Frank P.

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Offline denny

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Re: Single-hopped beers 2015 edition
« Reply #19 on: November 28, 2015, 10:18:16 am »
I'm about to keg and dry hop my X-17 beer.  Tasting when I took a gravity reading, I got a huge orange flavor and aroma with background notes of tangerine, lemon and lime.  I REALLY like these!
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Offline erockrph

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Re: Single-hopped beers 2015 edition
« Reply #20 on: November 28, 2015, 11:11:18 am »
Aha interesting method, want to try that too. How do you switch from one bottle to the next without spilling?
I have a racking cane stuck into a picnic tap to fill from. I just let go of the trigger, pull the cane out out and put it in the bottle right next to it. It might drip a few drops, but nothing big. It's faster than bottling a carbonated beer off a keg since there's no need to fill under pressure and keep burping the bottle, and there's no need to cap on foam. You can fill a bottle in 15 seconds or so and be on to the next one immediately after. Plus, you can do it all standing up over your sink rather than on the floor under your bottling bucket.
Eric B.

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Offline homoeccentricus

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Re: Single-hopped beers 2015 edition
« Reply #21 on: November 29, 2015, 11:11:52 am »
I can officially confirm that this method works with Star San  ;)
Frank P.

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Offline erockrph

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Re: Single-hopped beers 2015 edition
« Reply #22 on: December 14, 2015, 11:05:38 pm »
I finally tasted my first beer from this round of brews. I'll probably get to the rest at the end of the week, since this one could have used a bit more carbonation. I hate to cut and paste straight from my blog, but I have a lot of respect for what Pat is doing over at the Oregon Hophouse and thought a lot of the brewers here would be interested. I figured I'd share in full detail here as well:

The first hop that I'll be tasting from this batch of trials is X-17. X-17 is an experimental hop cultivar bred by The Oregon Hophouse. The Oregon Hophouse is a certified organic hop farm, and their hop breeding program is targeted at developing pest resistant hop cultivars. I had the pleasure of exchanging a few emails with Pat, who runs the farm where X-17 is under development. Even through a few short emails, it was quite clear to me that Pat is passionate about what they're doing on their farm.

Downy mildew is a serious concern in the Willamette Valley where Pat's farm is located, and a major barrier for organic crop production in the region. X-17 was bred for its tolerance of downy mildew. Not only does this allow for reduced fungicide use, which is a worthy benefit on its own, but it also allows more options for cover crops to help fix nitrogen in the soil. This type of "big picture" thinking is refreshing, and is the sign of a farmer who truly understands the barriers and benefits of organic farming.

Developing cultivars that thrive under organic farming practices is certainly a noble goal. I know I struggle with pests and disease just in my small home garden, so I can only imagine how challenging it must be on a commercial scale. But to me the most important feature in any food, organic or not, is flavor. So let's get to my tasting notes.

The aroma of the beer had a distinct orange and lemon zest aroma. The hop aroma was moderate in strength and did allow some of the toasty Munich malt aromas to peek through as well.

On the palate, the flavor followed the aroma very closely. Orange and lemon peel were the main flavors I was getting. Again, the hop presence was moderate and allowed the malt to show through as well. Also of note, I didn't pick up any significant pine or dank flavors that many C-hops bring along with their citrus character. Bitterness was crisp, but smooth, leaving a touch of resin on the finish.

I am really liking the X17. It's probably not bold enough to carry an IPA by itself, but it would certainly work as part of a blend - comparable to hops like Motueka or Mandarina Bavaria. It definitely makes one hell of a pale ale. X-17 also seems like the perfect hop for a wit, or maybe even a White IPA. It will probably be amazing paired with EKGs or other English hops in an ESB. I think it would make a great dry-hopped sour as well. The flavor profile of this hop makes it extremely versatile. To be honest, it's hard to think of a style that X-17 wouldn't be good in.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Single-hopped beers 2015 edition
« Reply #23 on: December 15, 2015, 09:11:58 am »
Sounds tasty. Glad to hear at least some parts of the industry are focusing on organic breeding.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2015, 11:19:51 am by morticaixavier »
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Single-hopped beers 2015 edition
« Reply #24 on: December 15, 2015, 09:21:16 am »
Thanks for the info. Sounds like a nice hop.
Jon H.

Offline denny

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Re: Single-hopped beers 2015 edition
« Reply #25 on: December 16, 2015, 10:16:45 am »
I finally tasted my first beer from this round of brews. I'll probably get to the rest at the end of the week, since this one could have used a bit more carbonation. I hate to cut and paste straight from my blog, but I have a lot of respect for what Pat is doing over at the Oregon Hophouse and thought a lot of the brewers here would be interested. I figured I'd share in full detail here as well:

The first hop that I'll be tasting from this batch of trials is X-17. X-17 is an experimental hop cultivar bred by The Oregon Hophouse. The Oregon Hophouse is a certified organic hop farm, and their hop breeding program is targeted at developing pest resistant hop cultivars. I had the pleasure of exchanging a few emails with Pat, who runs the farm where X-17 is under development. Even through a few short emails, it was quite clear to me that Pat is passionate about what they're doing on their farm.

Downy mildew is a serious concern in the Willamette Valley where Pat's farm is located, and a major barrier for organic crop production in the region. X-17 was bred for its tolerance of downy mildew. Not only does this allow for reduced fungicide use, which is a worthy benefit on its own, but it also allows more options for cover crops to help fix nitrogen in the soil. This type of "big picture" thinking is refreshing, and is the sign of a farmer who truly understands the barriers and benefits of organic farming.

Developing cultivars that thrive under organic farming practices is certainly a noble goal. I know I struggle with pests and disease just in my small home garden, so I can only imagine how challenging it must be on a commercial scale. But to me the most important feature in any food, organic or not, is flavor. So let's get to my tasting notes.

The aroma of the beer had a distinct orange and lemon zest aroma. The hop aroma was moderate in strength and did allow some of the toasty Munich malt aromas to peek through as well.

On the palate, the flavor followed the aroma very closely. Orange and lemon peel were the main flavors I was getting. Again, the hop presence was moderate and allowed the malt to show through as well. Also of note, I didn't pick up any significant pine or dank flavors that many C-hops bring along with their citrus character. Bitterness was crisp, but smooth, leaving a touch of resin on the finish.

I am really liking the X17. It's probably not bold enough to carry an IPA by itself, but it would certainly work as part of a blend - comparable to hops like Motueka or Mandarina Bavaria. It definitely makes one hell of a pale ale. X-17 also seems like the perfect hop for a wit, or maybe even a White IPA. It will probably be amazing paired with EKGs or other English hops in an ESB. I think it would make a great dry-hopped sour as well. The flavor profile of this hop makes it extremely versatile. To be honest, it's hard to think of a style that X-17 wouldn't be good in.

I kegged my X-17 APA a couple weeks ago.  I get orange, tangerine, lemon and lime from it.  I bittered a 1.056 beer to about 60-65 IBU, but it doesn't come across as that bitter.  I also didn't do anything extreme with water for it..I used a balanced profile because I didn't want to artificially exaggerate the hops.  I really like these hops and hope they make it into commercial production.
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Offline erockrph

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Re: Single-hopped beers 2015 edition
« Reply #26 on: December 16, 2015, 12:03:20 pm »
I kegged my X-17 APA a couple weeks ago.  I get orange, tangerine, lemon and lime from it.  I bittered a 1.056 beer to about 60-65 IBU, but it doesn't come across as that bitter.  I also didn't do anything extreme with water for it..I used a balanced profile because I didn't want to artificially exaggerate the hops.  I really like these hops and hope they make it into commercial production.
Same here! Pat had mentioned that he had 60 plants last year and will be up to an acre of production this year. I think this hop has a lot of potential.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline erockrph

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Re: Single-hopped beers 2015 edition
« Reply #27 on: December 19, 2015, 09:57:06 am »
I got around to tasting my Armadillo beer last night. These are leaf hops from the 2014 harvest from Yakima Valley Hops. To be honest, the raw hops left a lot to be desired right out of the gate. There wasn't much aroma to them at all. On its own, that's not necessarily a bad mark for whole hops. But the pound of hops I got reminded me of the bottom of a bag of chips. There were few whole cones; it was mostly loose bracts. There was very little of the stickiness and springiness that I often feel in good-quality hop cones.

In the beer itself, I picked up a rather mild hop character in the aroma. There was some herbal character with notes of citrus and lime. The flavor was even milder - there were faint citrus notes, some resinous pine and faint floral notes as well. The bittering character was a clinging resin on the back of the tongue. It's not as abrasive as something like Chinook or Columbus, but it's not particularly smooth either.

Overall, my experience with Armadillo is a swing and a miss. I'm sure some of this may be attributable to the quality of the hops I received, but I don't see much good use for the hops I have on hand. They could possibly be a decent bittering hop for an IPA, but that's all I got.
Eric B.

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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Single-hopped beers 2015 edition
« Reply #28 on: December 19, 2015, 10:17:16 am »
I'd be curious to see how the pellet form compares. Not curious enough to buy any right now though. Thanks for the info.
Jon H.

Offline erockrph

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Re: Single-hopped beers 2015 edition
« Reply #29 on: December 19, 2015, 12:53:08 pm »
My next tasting is HBC 438 (aka "Ron Mexico") from Hopunion, which also supports the Ales for ALS charity. In contrast to the Armadillo hops, the HBC hop pellets had a great aroma before they even made it to the beer.

The Ron Mexico beer had a very distinct, aromatic nose. The main aromas were passionfruit and blackcurrant. There was also some juniper in the background.

On the palate I found that the blackcurrant character took the lead, chased by passionfruit and citrus. I picked up just a fleeting hint of dank/onion at the tail end that gives way to a smooth juniper-resin bitterness on the finish.

HBC-438 is going to be a solid IPA hop for sure. It has a solid oil content (2.5-3.5 mL/100 g), and a distinct flavor profile. It should be able to hold its own with other hops in a blend quite well. I look forward to playing around with this one a bit more.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer