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Author Topic: pH meters...  (Read 7305 times)

Offline tommymorris

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pH meters...
« Reply #15 on: December 07, 2015, 04:56:06 pm »
Good call out Jon. Getting a hold of batch data can be nearly impossible when buying by the pound. I have shopped at some shops that keeps the grain in the sack, or keep that info handy, but that is few and far between in my experience.


I normally keep some dark grains on hand but I was out, so I bought the RB from the LHBS. I was skeptical when the guy told me that L range, so I went to the back with him. It was Munton's RB and that range was stamped on the bag. I know some maltsters have a wide range on dark grains, but that's a WIDE range. Makes trusting software to predict accurately a crapshoot in that case.
I think you could run Brunwater with the RB at both ends of the maltster's range to bracket the Ph. Depending on your recipe that might tell you all you need to know.
« Last Edit: December 07, 2015, 05:26:27 pm by alestateyall »

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: pH meters...
« Reply #16 on: December 07, 2015, 05:22:33 pm »

Good call out Jon. Getting a hold of batch data can be nearly impossible when buying by the pound. I have shopped at some shops that keeps the grain in the sack, or keep that info handy, but that is few and far between in my experience.


I normally keep some dark grains on hand but I was out, so I bought the RB from the LHBS. I was skeptical when the guy told me that L range, so I went to the back with him. It was Munton's RB and that range was stamped on the bag. I know some maltsters have a wide range on dark grains, but that's a WIDE range. Makes trusting software to predict accurately a crapshoot in that case.
I think you could run Brunwater with the RB at both ends of the maltster's range to bracket the Ph. Depending on your recipe hat might tell you all you need to know.


You could definitely do that, for sure. I just like the peace of mind of checking in this case.
Jon H.

Offline mabrungard

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Re: pH meters...
« Reply #17 on: December 07, 2015, 06:47:40 pm »
I think you could run Brunwater with the RB at both ends of the maltster's range to bracket the Ph. Depending on your recipe that might tell you all you need to know.

Roasted grains tend to have the same degree of acidity, so there isn't much worry about their color rating and subsequent effect on pH. It is treated the same within Bru'n Water.
Martin B
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Offline tommymorris

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Re: pH meters...
« Reply #18 on: December 07, 2015, 06:48:46 pm »

I think you could run Brunwater with the RB at both ends of the maltster's range to bracket the Ph. Depending on your recipe that might tell you all you need to know.

Roasted grains tend to have the same degree of acidity, so there isn't much worry about their color rating and subsequent effect on pH. It is treated the same within Bru'n Water.
Thanks for the clarification.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: pH meters...
« Reply #19 on: December 07, 2015, 06:54:59 pm »
I think you could run Brunwater with the RB at both ends of the maltster's range to bracket the Ph. Depending on your recipe that might tell you all you need to know.

Roasted grains tend to have the same degree of acidity, so there isn't much worry about their color rating and subsequent effect on pH. It is treated the same within Bru'n Water.



Wow, that's good to know, Martin. So acidity doesn't go up from say 300L to 600L?
Jon H.

Offline mabrungard

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Re: pH meters...
« Reply #20 on: December 08, 2015, 06:26:03 am »
Wow, that's good to know, Martin. So acidity doesn't go up from say 300L to 600L?

Roast acidity varies quite a bit, but it doesn't seem to be well correlated to color rating. Review the results in Kai's paper on malt acidity and you will note that base and crystal malts tend to correlate well with color rating, but the roast is all over the place. About the only thing I could get out of the data was that roast has a somewhat consistent level of acidity. I just eye-balled an average value. The good thing is that we don't typically use that much roast in our brews.
Martin B
Carmel, IN

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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: pH meters...
« Reply #21 on: December 08, 2015, 06:29:43 am »
Wow, that's good to know, Martin. So acidity doesn't go up from say 300L to 600L?

Roast acidity varies quite a bit, but it doesn't seem to be well correlated to color rating. Review the results in Kai's paper on malt acidity and you will note that base and crystal malts tend to correlate well with color rating, but the roast is all over the place. About the only thing I could get out of the data was that roast has a somewhat consistent level of acidity. I just eye-balled an average value. The good thing is that we don't typically use that much roast in our brews.

Right. Thanks for the info !
Jon H.

Offline AmandaK

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Re: pH meters...
« Reply #22 on: December 08, 2015, 06:58:52 am »
Wow, that's good to know, Martin. So acidity doesn't go up from say 300L to 600L?

Roast acidity varies quite a bit, but it doesn't seem to be well correlated to color rating. Review the results in Kai's paper on malt acidity and you will note that base and crystal malts tend to correlate well with color rating, but the roast is all over the place. About the only thing I could get out of the data was that roast has a somewhat consistent level of acidity. I just eye-balled an average value. The good thing is that we don't typically use that much roast in our brews.

Right. Thanks for the info !

Thank you Martin! I had been wanting to blame my sometimes low mash pH in a couple of dark beers on the *L of the roast. Sounds like I have to suss out another culprit. :/
Amanda Burkemper
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Offline scottkey

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Re: pH meters...
« Reply #23 on: August 19, 2016, 07:23:51 pm »
I went with an Omega PHH-7011 about a year ago as I finally tackling the topic of water chemistry + needed a more accurate way to measure mash pH.  This meter is easy to use and works well, but ran into a silly issue last week where the batteries died + I couldn't remove a screw that holds the cover on.  None of my usual tricks worked and so I sent the folks at Omega an email asking if they had any tips.  Within a day I had a great email from customer service saying they'd be happy to replace the meter free of charge.  Say what?

Not only is this a great meter but Omega really stands behind their products.  That's worth more than the meter in my book.  Highly recommend.

Offline homebrewdad7

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Re: pH meters...
« Reply #24 on: August 22, 2016, 04:26:51 pm »
I also have the Omega PHH-7011, and I challenge anyone to find a comparably priced meter that is better.

I did a full review on the meter - and like the OP, I am not a paid spokesperson.