Author Topic: 1st Time Kegging Frustrations  (Read 996 times)

Offline theoman

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1st Time Kegging Frustrations
« on: December 20, 2015, 09:47:21 AM »
After more than 20 years of bottling, I finally decided to give kegging a go. I read instructions, I watched videos, but I think things are still going wrong.

So, I filled a keg last night, pressurized, soaped up the fittings and everything seemed to be ok. I had lagered the beer before filling the keg (so it was chilled) and put the works back in the fridge at about 4C. I left the gas connected and on overnight and this morning, it looked like the bottle pressure went down quite a bit (no, I didn't weigh the tank. I know, I know...). I turned the gas off this morning. After a while, I went and turned it back on and heard gas flowing. I took everything out, sprayed with soapy water and didn't notice any bubbles. Help?

My questions are:
1. Did I do anything wrong?
2. Does it sound like there's a leak, and if so,
3. How do I find the leak?

Online klickitat jim

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Re: 1st Time Kegging Frustrations
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2015, 09:57:22 AM »
After more than 20 years of bottling, I finally decided to give kegging a go. I read instructions, I watched videos, but I think things are still going wrong.

So, I filled a keg last night, pressurized, soaped up the fittings and everything seemed to be ok. I had lagered the beer before filling the keg (so it was chilled) and put the works back in the fridge at about 4C. I left the gas connected and on overnight and this morning, it looked like the bottle pressure went down quite a bit (no, I didn't weigh the tank. I know, I know...). I turned the gas off this morning. After a while, I went and turned it back on and heard gas flowing. I took everything out, sprayed with soapy water and didn't notice any bubbles. Help?

My questions are:
1. Did I do anything wrong?
2. Does it sound like there's a leak, and if so,
3. How do I find the leak?
After losing a full tank of CO2 in the past, I like to use teflon tape on all threaded fittings now.

Offline erockrph

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Re: 1st Time Kegging Frustrations
« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2015, 10:27:30 AM »
Was the CO2 tank at room temp before and in the fridge now? The temp drop would also drop the pressure.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline Jeffinn

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Re: 1st Time Kegging Frustrations
« Reply #3 on: December 20, 2015, 01:19:29 PM »
Was the CO2 tank at room temp before and in the fridge now? The temp drop would also drop the pressure.
+1 to this. Tank pressure will drop when chilled.
“I’ve never been drunk, but often I’ve been overserved.”
~ George Gobel

Online jeffy

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Re: 1st Time Kegging Frustrations
« Reply #4 on: December 20, 2015, 01:24:55 PM »
The gas that you originally put into the keg was absorbed by the beer.  That's why you heard more gas enter.  Until the beer is saturated for the temperature and pressure you have chosen it will "take" more gas.
Jeff Gladish, Tampa (989.3, 175.1 Apparent Rennarian)
Homebrewing since 1990
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: 1st Time Kegging Frustrations
« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2015, 02:18:55 PM »
The gas that you originally put into the keg was absorbed by the beer.  That's why you heard more gas enter.  Until the beer is saturated for the temperature and pressure you have chosen it will "take" more gas.


My thought, too.
Jon H.

Offline theoman

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Re: 1st Time Kegging Frustrations
« Reply #6 on: December 20, 2015, 03:51:44 PM »
Thanks, all. I think you answered my next questions as well. I took the keg and tank out for an hour or two and noticed the pressure on both gauges going up. But, I have a couple  more questions:
4. With the gas off, does the keg gauge show the pressure in the keg? (Sometimes you gotta ask stupid questions)
5. When force carbonating, do you leave the gas on?

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: 1st Time Kegging Frustrations
« Reply #7 on: December 20, 2015, 04:02:12 PM »
I leave the gas connected. When it reaches equilibrium with the setting on your regulator it won't carb any further. With the gas off the keg gauge just reads the pressure that would be going in if the gas were going in from the tank, ie., gas valve open.
Jon H.

Offline Stevie

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Re: 1st Time Kegging Frustrations
« Reply #8 on: December 20, 2015, 04:22:29 PM »
The gauge cannot read the pressure in the keg as it is protected by a check valve. Well, it should be protected by a check valve.

Offline theoman

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Re: 1st Time Kegging Frustrations
« Reply #9 on: December 21, 2015, 10:00:37 AM »
You guys are awesome. Thanks. I think I got it figured out. I'll find out for sure in a few days.  :)

Offline jtoots

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Re: 1st Time Kegging Frustrations
« Reply #10 on: December 21, 2015, 01:50:02 PM »
my first few months kegging i went through a few CO2 tanks, discovering one slow leak after another.  hang in there, be patient, and eventually you'll hit your stride.  make sure that all the connections are wrench tightened, not finger tightened.  the carbonation process will be slower, but if you're skeptical of a leak somewhere, hit it with high pressure, close it off, repeat for a bit (this is a PITA and not how i normally do it, but helped me get through the learning curve).

when you're carbing up, especially at high pressure, don't connect the beer line.  one less opportunity for a leak... and a messy one.  at least gas line leaks just sacrifice CO2.

it's worth it... bottling is a time suck.