Author Topic: Cooking on a salt rock  (Read 1703 times)

Offline majorvices

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Cooking on a salt rock
« on: December 25, 2015, 10:36:26 PM »
I got a really cool gift from my wife, a Himalayan salt block for cooking. Looks like something really fun, I'm thinking about trying an egg on it first and then a steak on Sunday. Anyone of you doing this? Tips and advice would be cool.

Offline jeffy

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Re: Cooking on a salt rock
« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2015, 12:07:52 AM »
I got a really cool gift from my wife, a Himalayan salt block for cooking. Looks like something really fun, I'm thinking about trying an egg on it first and then a steak on Sunday. Anyone of you doing this? Tips and advice would be cool.
I have one also, but have only used it once.  I heated it on a wok ring on the stove and cooked a filet of salmon with some herbs.  I thought at the time that it would be better not to use oil, but everything stuck to it pretty bad.  It's pretty cool and doesn't make the food too salty.
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Offline pete b

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Re: Cooking on a salt rock
« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2015, 03:15:53 AM »
I haven't had much luck heating them and cooking on them. I find them more useful cold. We keep a couple in the freezer. I love putting sliced radishes or cukes on the cold stone and snacking on them with a beer on a hot day. You can also use them cold to "cook" seviche. My girlfriend uses two to sandwich slices of watermelon which end up with a similar texture and flavor to prociutto, believe it or not.
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Offline majorvices

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Re: Cooking on a salt rock
« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2015, 02:55:16 PM »
I haven't had much luck heating them and cooking on them. I find them more useful cold. We keep a couple in the freezer. I love putting sliced radishes or cukes on the cold stone and snacking on them with a beer on a hot day. You can also use them cold to "cook" seviche. My girlfriend uses two to sandwich slices of watermelon which end up with a similar texture and flavor to prociutto, believe it or not.

I heated mine up on my gas stove top without any problems yesterday. I didn't cook on it though. I'm really liking the "using it cold" idea though especially for the seviche. My wife travels to southwest on business several times a year and she loves seviche. You have a recipe you'd like to share using the stone? I've never made it but have wanted too.

Offline MDixon

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Re: Cooking on a salt rock
« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2015, 02:56:36 PM »
I've looked into it, but never purchased one. IIRC everyone suggests heating the rock slowly to 500F or more before use.
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Offline pete b

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Re: Cooking on a salt rock
« Reply #5 on: December 27, 2015, 01:29:08 PM »
I haven't had much luck heating them and cooking on them. I find them more useful cold. We keep a couple in the freezer. I love putting sliced radishes or cukes on the cold stone and snacking on them with a beer on a hot day. You can also use them cold to "cook" seviche. My girlfriend uses two to sandwich slices of watermelon which end up with a similar texture and flavor to prociutto, believe it or not.

I heated mine up on my gas stove top without any problems yesterday. I didn't cook on it though. I'm really liking the "using it cold" idea though especially for the seviche. My wife travels to southwest on business several times a year and she loves seviche. You have a recipe you'd like to share using the stone? I've never made it but have wanted too.
I don't write recipes down much but I remember my process. I take nice fresh fish, usually scallops or wild salmon but whatever you can get fresh is best, and slice about 1/4 inch thick, toss in a bowl with your acid and possibly other seasonings then arrange on the block. Its OK to touch or even slightly overlap. Put the block on a plate to catch liquid. At this point since we have two we put another block on top and put in fridge. If I had one I would put a piece of plastic or foil on top and place a brick on top to speed things up. With one block that is more or less full I would turn the fish over in 30 minutes, and see how much it "cooked" so you know when to check again.
You can use whatever acid you want based on the flavor profile you want: lemon juice, lime juice, your favorite vinegar. I have even used Kim chi juice. You just need enough to coat.
I tend to add any other ingredients, especially raw veggie like diced onion or chili peppers after to save room on the block and prevent extra water from being drawn out of the veggies.
One thing I did was a fish taco inspired appetizer. I think I used halibut. I used lime and lime zest on the block and then when done tossed with diced jalapenos, red onions and other seasonings. I served it on fried polenta chips but freshly fried cut up tortillas would be great too.
I have also made a quick gravlax with salmon and dill.
« Last Edit: December 27, 2015, 01:33:37 PM by pete b »
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Offline majorvices

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Re: Cooking on a salt rock
« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2015, 02:45:39 PM »
Thanks, I have two blocks so this will work great. I may try it today!

Offline curtism1234

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Re: Cooking on a salt rock
« Reply #7 on: December 30, 2015, 06:24:37 PM »
I've looked into it, but never purchased one. IIRC everyone suggests heating the rock slowly to 500F or more before use.

Right, otherwise I suspect it will crack

Offline erockrph

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Re: Cooking on a salt rock
« Reply #8 on: December 31, 2015, 08:58:39 AM »
I got one for my birthday in October, but I haven't cured it yet. I think I'll probably use it more for a cheese/charcuterie platter, but fried eggs and grilled veggies are two things I see myself trying on the hot side with it.
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Offline majorvices

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Re: Cooking on a salt rock
« Reply #9 on: January 02, 2016, 07:47:54 PM »


Steak and taters!

Offline pete b

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Re: Cooking on a salt rock
« Reply #10 on: February 28, 2016, 01:01:41 PM »
Yesterday was national bacon day yet I had no bacon. I decided to use the salt blocks to make some bacon out of some nice fatty Scottish salmon I had on hand. I sliced bacon shaped strips, added fresh black pepper and smoked paprika then speed cured it between two bricks with weight. Then I put it in the oven on a rack on a sheet pan with low heat after brushing with a bourbon maple glaze. Then I fried it and it was awesome.

That's not all of it, I wanted plenty of room in the pan.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2016, 01:04:04 PM by pete b »
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Offline pete b

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Re: Cooking on a salt rock
« Reply #11 on: February 28, 2016, 11:15:07 PM »

Using the rest today. Look at the fat on that salmon. Its delicious raw.
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Offline euge

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Re: Cooking on a salt rock
« Reply #12 on: February 28, 2016, 11:39:34 PM »
A little wasabi. Maybe a dab of excellent soysauce. Salivating over salmon!
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Cooking on a salt rock
« Reply #13 on: February 28, 2016, 11:41:12 PM »
A little wasabi. Maybe a dab of excellent soysauce. Salivating over salmon!


Yeah, that was my thought, too. Sounds awesome. Nice looking salmon.
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Offline pete b

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Re: Cooking on a salt rock
« Reply #14 on: February 29, 2016, 12:05:20 AM »
Your close geographically. Some is filling for pot stickers, some will be tempura. Wasabi mayo will happen.
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