Poll

For your vanilla American yeast strains, do you raise fermentation temps towards the end of fermentation?

Yes
16 (61.5%)
No
5 (19.2%)
One degree at a time for a number of days
1 (3.8%)
RDWHAHB
4 (15.4%)
Other (please explain)
0 (0%)

Total Members Voted: 24

Author Topic: Raising Fermentation Temps  (Read 718 times)

Offline flbrewer

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Raising Fermentation Temps
« on: December 30, 2015, 10:58:44 PM »
Thanks! I'm on day 10, dry hopped today and just curious what you are doing....

Offline denny

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Re: Raising Fermentation Temps
« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2015, 11:07:16 PM »
I always do, no matter what the yeast.  Can't hurt is my theory.  After 2-3 days at 70-72, it goes down to 33 for at least 3 days.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Raising Fermentation Temps
« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2015, 11:10:28 PM »
Same here for me, every beer.
Jon H.

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Raising Fermentation Temps
« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2015, 11:11:49 PM »
Lately all my beers get starting temp till they are half way through fermentation then I pull the thermal probe from the beer temp to ambient and bump temp to 74 for ales 68 for lagers. They free rise to that till all done.

Offline erockrph

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Re: Raising Fermentation Temps
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2015, 08:37:10 AM »
For me it depends. For a lot of ales I'll just put them in my basement and forget about them until packaging time. If I'm dealing with a cold snap with very low temps, then I will move them to a warmer part of the basement after the first week or so.
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Offline brewinhard

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Re: Raising Fermentation Temps
« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2015, 12:51:37 PM »
Yep.  Pretty much always bump up the temps towards the end of fermentation whether it is for an ale or lager.  The warmer temps can only help the yeast condition the beer and keep them active and happy.

Offline Pricelessbrewing

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Re: Raising Fermentation Temps
« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2015, 06:45:19 PM »
Yup. Maintain ferm temp for ~3 days, then I raise temp 2~ degrees a day till it hits 72 which I hold till it reaches a stable fg then cold crash and gelatin.

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Re: Raising Fermentation Temps
« Reply #7 on: January 01, 2016, 01:09:00 AM »
With respect to ale fermentation, I have found that steady-state fermentations almost always finish cleaner than upward rising temperature fermentations in my brewery.  The trade-off is longer fermentation times.  With respect to steady-state fermentations, the sweet spot in my brewery is 64F internal.

Offline brewinhard

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Re: Raising Fermentation Temps
« Reply #8 on: January 01, 2016, 02:30:54 PM »
With respect to ale fermentation, I have found that steady-state fermentations almost always finish cleaner than upward rising temperature fermentations in my brewery.  The trade-off is longer fermentation times.  With respect to steady-state fermentations, the sweet spot in my brewery is 64F internal.

But if the temps are raised with minimal consumption of sugars remaining in the wort are the yeast really spitting out that much more in the way of esters and phenolics at this point or has most of this production already occurred in the first few days?