Author Topic: wort makeup and attenuation  (Read 2867 times)

Offline brewinhard

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Re: wort makeup and attenuation
« Reply #15 on: January 15, 2016, 03:04:20 PM »
If you repitched  a dry yeast from a previous fermentation (slurry) with poor aeration, then that could definitely be your issue. While dry yeast reportedly does not need oxygen in its initial use, subsequent generations will most definitely be oxygen deprived and in great need of proper aeration to fully attenuate your next batch of wort.

Offline brewinhard

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Re: wort makeup and attenuation
« Reply #16 on: January 15, 2016, 03:05:42 PM »
There seems to be something wrong with my process (aeration) when repitching dry yeast slurry. I don't do it very often but I seem to have more issues when I do. For me, the savings in money doesn't appear to be worth the headache.

+1 to this.  For the low cost of most dry ale yeast, I pretty much use a new rehydrated pack each time.

Offline Iliff Ave Brewhouse

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Re: wort makeup and attenuation
« Reply #17 on: January 15, 2016, 03:11:43 PM »
I am glad to find the cause. Until I change my aeration process, I know to just direct pitch straight from the sachets.

I kegged the beer a couple of days ago. The final reading was 1.015 so not horrible by any means. This was my 4th lager. The 3 before it went better than planned and this was my first hiccup.
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The Beerery

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Re: wort makeup and attenuation
« Reply #18 on: January 15, 2016, 03:14:44 PM »
You really need to be getting these lagers to 2.5p and below. 3.8p is syrup sweet.

Offline Iliff Ave Brewhouse

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Re: wort makeup and attenuation
« Reply #19 on: January 15, 2016, 03:16:33 PM »
You really need to be getting these lagers to 2.5p and below. 3.8p is syrup sweet.

I am good with it. Tastes fine to me.
On Tap/Bottled: Golsch, Iliff IPA, Hopfenbier, Salted berry cider

Fermenting: Rye Cream Ale
Up Next: G Pils, Maibock

The Beerery

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Re: wort makeup and attenuation
« Reply #20 on: January 15, 2016, 03:21:15 PM »
 :o Ok.

Offline Iliff Ave Brewhouse

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Re: wort makeup and attenuation
« Reply #21 on: January 15, 2016, 03:23:28 PM »
:o Ok.

Sorry. I am one of those lager novice's that drive you crazy. This isn't a German lager and the FG fits within the style guidelines for what I was going for. It is not ideal but I am good with it  :o

Are you willing to give me some helpful advice on how to get my lager down below 3.8p or provide input on the possible problem?
« Last Edit: January 15, 2016, 03:25:02 PM by goschman »
On Tap/Bottled: Golsch, Iliff IPA, Hopfenbier, Salted berry cider

Fermenting: Rye Cream Ale
Up Next: G Pils, Maibock

The Beerery

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Re: wort makeup and attenuation
« Reply #22 on: January 15, 2016, 03:27:47 PM »
:o Ok.

Sorry. I am one of those lager novice's that drive you crazy. This isn't a German lager and the FG fits within the style guidelines for what I was going for. It is not ideal but I am good with it  :o

Are you willing to give me some helpful advice on how to get my lager down below 3.8p or provide input on the possible problem?


Without FFT's you don't know what kind of wort your are making. So FFT's, along with plenty of healthy oxygenated yeast. That should get you on the map.
« Last Edit: January 15, 2016, 03:32:52 PM by The Beerery »

Offline Iliff Ave Brewhouse

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Re: wort makeup and attenuation
« Reply #23 on: January 15, 2016, 03:33:46 PM »
:o Ok.

Sorry. I am one of those lager novice's that drive you crazy. This isn't a German lager and the FG fits within the style guidelines for what I was going for. It is not ideal but I am good with it  :o

Are you willing to give me some helpful advice on how to get my lager down below 3.8p or provide input on the possible problem?


Without FFT's you don't know what kind of wort your are making. So FFT's, along with plenty of healthy oxygenated yeast. That should get you on the map.

Great thanks.
On Tap/Bottled: Golsch, Iliff IPA, Hopfenbier, Salted berry cider

Fermenting: Rye Cream Ale
Up Next: G Pils, Maibock

Offline denny

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Re: wort makeup and attenuation
« Reply #24 on: January 15, 2016, 04:00:43 PM »
If you repitched  a dry yeast from a previous fermentation (slurry) with poor aeration, then that could definitely be your issue. While dry yeast reportedly does not need oxygen in its initial use, subsequent generations will most definitely be oxygen deprived and in great need of proper aeration to fully attenuate your next batch of wort.

Hmmmm...if oxygen is used to synthesize sterols needed for yeast reproduction, but you already have a heavy population of yeast cells, do you really need aeration?
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Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: wort makeup and attenuation
« Reply #25 on: January 15, 2016, 04:36:52 PM »
If you repitched  a dry yeast from a previous fermentation (slurry) with poor aeration, then that could definitely be your issue. While dry yeast reportedly does not need oxygen in its initial use, subsequent generations will most definitely be oxygen deprived and in great need of proper aeration to fully attenuate your next batch of wort.

Why would a slurry from an initial pitch of dry yeast be any different from a slurry from a Wyeast pitch?
It's all in the reflexes. - Jack Burton

Offline narcout

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Re: wort makeup and attenuation
« Reply #26 on: January 15, 2016, 05:40:56 PM »
If you repitched  a dry yeast from a previous fermentation (slurry) with poor aeration, then that could definitely be your issue. While dry yeast reportedly does not need oxygen in its initial use, subsequent generations will most definitely be oxygen deprived and in great need of proper aeration to fully attenuate your next batch of wort.

Hmmmm...if oxygen is used to synthesize sterols needed for yeast reproduction, but you already have a heavy population of yeast cells, do you really need aeration?

If you believe in the gospel according to S. Cerevisiae: (i) yeast cells harvested at the end of fermentation have reached quiescence and have low ergosterol and UFA reserves, (ii) ergosterol and UFA reserves help keep cell walls pliable, (iii) low pliability negatively affects the ability of yeast to attenuate extract as it makes it more difficult for nutrients and waste to pass in and out of cells, (iv) since yeast use O2 to synthesize ergosterol and UFA, cells with low ergosterol and UFA reserves have higher O2 demands and benefit from proper aeration/oxygenation.

Not my own knowledge, just paraphrasing...
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Offline brewinhard

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Re: wort makeup and attenuation
« Reply #27 on: January 15, 2016, 05:46:52 PM »
If you repitched  a dry yeast from a previous fermentation (slurry) with poor aeration, then that could definitely be your issue. While dry yeast reportedly does not need oxygen in its initial use, subsequent generations will most definitely be oxygen deprived and in great need of proper aeration to fully attenuate your next batch of wort.

Why would a slurry from an initial pitch of dry yeast be any different from a slurry from a Wyeast pitch?

I don't believe it is.  Both are oxygen deprived and in need of a good healthy dose of aeration.

Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: wort makeup and attenuation
« Reply #28 on: January 15, 2016, 05:52:38 PM »
If you repitched  a dry yeast from a previous fermentation (slurry) with poor aeration, then that could definitely be your issue. While dry yeast reportedly does not need oxygen in its initial use, subsequent generations will most definitely be oxygen deprived and in great need of proper aeration to fully attenuate your next batch of wort.

Why would a slurry from an initial pitch of dry yeast be any different from a slurry from a Wyeast pitch?

I don't believe it is.  Both are oxygen deprived and in need of a good healthy dose of aeration.

OK.  Agreed.  I seemed odd to me that a number of posts kept referencing dry yeast.
It's all in the reflexes. - Jack Burton

Offline brewinhard

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Re: wort makeup and attenuation
« Reply #29 on: January 15, 2016, 05:56:02 PM »
If you repitched  a dry yeast from a previous fermentation (slurry) with poor aeration, then that could definitely be your issue. While dry yeast reportedly does not need oxygen in its initial use, subsequent generations will most definitely be oxygen deprived and in great need of proper aeration to fully attenuate your next batch of wort.

Why would a slurry from an initial pitch of dry yeast be any different from a slurry from a Wyeast pitch?

I don't believe it is.  Both are oxygen deprived and in need of a good healthy dose of aeration.

OK.  Agreed.  I seemed odd to me that a number of posts kept referencing dry yeast.

I thought the OP stated that he had re-pitched a slurry from a dry yeast packet so I was just referencing that.