Author Topic: Fruity, tropical hop rhizomes I can actually get my hands on?  (Read 8612 times)

Offline clowder

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
Fruity, tropical hop rhizomes I can actually get my hands on?
« on: January 22, 2016, 01:14:27 PM »
Hi all,

I'm hoping to take the plunge this spring and order some hop rhizomes. I really enjoy IPAs that include Citra and Mosaic hops, but my understanding is that these are proprietary and I'm not going to be able to grow them myself.

My question to you: What commercially available hops come close (if any), or would lend some of those tropical, fruity characteristics to my brew? What have you enjoyed growing and using?

Thanks!

Offline IMperry9

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 217
    • View Profile
Re: Fruity, tropical hop rhizomes I can actually get my hands on?
« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2016, 03:47:46 PM »
Zenith- Hoppy Citrus flavors, Dual purpose hop
Galena- Citrusy Bittering type Bittering hop mostly
Centennial- "super Cascade"/Floral citrus notes type hop, Dual purpose
Cascade- Obvious choice
Columbus- Sharp citrus herbal resinous Dual purpose hop

Here is just a few to get you started. There are more you could probably find but I this is what I found just off a quick search. You can find Hop rhizomes and field grade plants in a lot of variety Here: http://wxgyp.pmgdc.servertrust.com/category-s/120.htm?searching=Y&sort=7&cat=120&show=100&page=1 and here: http://www.greatlakeshops.com/shop-now.html
A fine beer may be judged with only one sip, but it's better to be thoroughly sure.
Kegged/Bottled: N/A
Coming up:
SMaSH Rye Pale Ale
Chocolate Rye Stout
Milk Stout

Offline b-hoppy

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 162
    • View Profile
Re: Fruity, tropical hop rhizomes I can actually get my hands on?
« Reply #2 on: January 23, 2016, 05:11:12 PM »
Like you mentioned, most of the varieties that fit your description are proprietary and most likely won't be available to the general public to grow for quite a while.  Your best bet is to stick a few different varieties in the ground and judge for yourself. 

Hops are pretty interesting in that they tend to produce a unique oil package depending on where they're grown.  The differences can be pretty dramatic or subtle depending on the environment/soils . . . "terroir".  My first exposure to this phenomenon was quite a few years ago after harvesting my Chinook which leaned pretty hard toward spearmint here in NEOhio.  Last year I picked up a pound of Chinook from some grower friends I know up in Michigan and theirs had a very pronounced pineapple character.  So stick a few in the ground and take good notes!

Offline erockrph

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 6229
  • Chepachet, RI
    • View Profile
    • The Hop WHisperer
Re: Fruity, tropical hop rhizomes I can actually get my hands on?
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2016, 03:43:33 PM »
I'm in a similar boat. I grew hops for a couple of years when I first started brewing, but I ended up growing varietals that I don't really have an interest in brewing with. I decided to restart 2-3 plants this season, but I've been looking for something that I'm actually going to want to use. Cascade and Centennial don't do much for me, since every commercial brewery has used these to death. I'm definitely going to grow Sterling, since I use it in my lagers quite a bit. My others are going to be two of the following:

Sorachi Ace
Crystal
Glacier
Pacific Gem
Kent Golding

I'm leaning towards Sorachi (from Farmhouse Brewing Supply) and Pacific Gem (from Great Lakes Hops), right now. But Kent Golding is tempting to try since I often brew English ales over the winter.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline erockrph

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 6229
  • Chepachet, RI
    • View Profile
    • The Hop WHisperer
Re: Fruity, tropical hop rhizomes I can actually get my hands on?
« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2016, 03:48:48 PM »
I also wanted to add that if anyone sees any Meridian rhizomes or plants for order in their travels, please pass the info along. I don't think that variety is trademarked or patented, and I'd love to grow some.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Online dmtaylor

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3428
  • Two Rivers, WI
    • View Profile
    • Manty Malters - Meet the Malters! - Dave Taylor
Re: Fruity, tropical hop rhizomes I can actually get my hands on?
« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2016, 04:06:38 PM »
I'm thinking Columbus (or Tomahawk or Zeus) might be the closest available American thing to a tropical Aussie style hop.  Columbus to me tastes like pineapple, pine, and citrus, like an ultra mega Cascade/Centennial with a bit of extra craziness.
Dave

The world will become a much more pleasant place to live when each and every one of us realizes that we are all idiots.

Offline gman23

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3513
    • View Profile
Re: Fruity, tropical hop rhizomes I can actually get my hands on?
« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2016, 04:14:24 PM »
I'm thinking Columbus (or Tomahawk or Zeus) might be the closest available American thing to a tropical Aussie style hop.  Columbus to me tastes like pineapple, pine, and citrus, like an ultra mega Cascade/Centennial with a bit of extra craziness.

Man I wish I got that out of it. It is always dank, pungent, and resinous to me without much fruit or citrus notes.
On Tap/Bottled: Kurbis Marzen, Red Rye, Vienna Lager, Dry Hopped Peach Cider       

Fermenting: Imperial Porter, Hopfenbier
Up Next: Maibock, Braunbier

Online dmtaylor

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3428
  • Two Rivers, WI
    • View Profile
    • Manty Malters - Meet the Malters! - Dave Taylor
Re: Fruity, tropical hop rhizomes I can actually get my hands on?
« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2016, 04:17:03 PM »
Man I wish I got that out of it. It is always dank, pungent, and resinous to me without much fruit or citrus notes.

I find it excellent on its own or even better in a blend.  Try blending with Cascade or Citra, can't go wrong there.  It can also evolve a bit with age in the bottle or keg.
Dave

The world will become a much more pleasant place to live when each and every one of us realizes that we are all idiots.

Offline HoosierBrew

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 13030
  • Indianapolis,IN
    • View Profile
Re: Fruity, tropical hop rhizomes I can actually get my hands on?
« Reply #8 on: March 04, 2016, 04:23:18 PM »
It is always dank, pungent, and resinous to me without much fruit or citrus notes.


Same for me. I've had Columbus before that was mildly citrusy but it's usually dank, piney, and resinous to me. I love it as a balance for citrusy or fruity hops. Just goes to show how we can all perceive hops a little differently.
Jon H.

Offline erockrph

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 6229
  • Chepachet, RI
    • View Profile
    • The Hop WHisperer
Re: Fruity, tropical hop rhizomes I can actually get my hands on?
« Reply #9 on: March 04, 2016, 04:34:48 PM »
It is always dank, pungent, and resinous to me without much fruit or citrus notes.
Same for me. I've had Columbus before that was mildly citrusy but it's usually dank, piney, and resinous to me. I love it as a balance for citrusy or fruity hops. Just goes to show how we can all perceive hops a little differently.
Same here. I sometimes get a little orange peel note from it (and Chinook as well), but it is mostly pine, resin, and dank to me.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline b-hoppy

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 162
    • View Profile
Re: Fruity, tropical hop rhizomes I can actually get my hands on?
« Reply #10 on: March 04, 2016, 06:36:20 PM »
It is always dank, pungent, and resinous to me without much fruit or citrus notes.
Same for me. I've had Columbus before that was mildly citrusy but it's usually dank, piney, and resinous to me. I love it as a balance for citrusy or fruity hops. Just goes to show how we can all perceive hops a little differently.
Same here. I sometimes get a little orange peel note from it (and Chinook as well), but it is mostly pine, resin, and dank to me.

The whole terroir 'thing' concerning hops must be pretty real.  I recently purchased some Oregon grown Citra (yes the folks from WA realize and maybe actually admit that aroma hops do better  south of the border) which ended up producing one of the best beers I've ever brewed.  I've also seen folks commenting (online) about the poor quality of this year's Citra crop vs what they've come to expect.  A few weeks ago I conversed with a fellow in the hop industry over in the UK who also mentioned that the '15 Citra he has access to isn't the greatest.  When I asked him if the difference in the quality might have had to do with his product being sourced from WA as opposed to OR (VERY hot & dry year up there last summer) and he said that most likely was the reason. 

Also, I found this article a day or two ago which seems to confirm that differences can be impacted by location, climate, etc..  It's from last year so sorry in advance if any of you have seen it: http://appellationbeer.com/blog/cascade-a-study-in-hop-terroir/

Online dmtaylor

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3428
  • Two Rivers, WI
    • View Profile
    • Manty Malters - Meet the Malters! - Dave Taylor
Re: Fruity, tropical hop rhizomes I can actually get my hands on?
« Reply #11 on: March 04, 2016, 07:40:43 PM »
The whole terroir 'thing' concerning hops must be pretty real.....

Oh, absolutely.  Hops can vary a LOT in character depending on where they're grown.  Also the amount of sun/clouds/shade and rain have huge effects as well.  Hops are very sensitive to microclimate and soil conditions, no doubt about it.

FWIW, the Meridian hops I got last year were crap.  I know erockrph loves them but mine were like mild nothingness, no sweet or fruity aroma to speak of at all whatsoever.  I think I ended up using them in a Belgian golden strong and I couldn't taste anything from them in that beer either.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2016, 07:42:40 PM by dmtaylor »
Dave

The world will become a much more pleasant place to live when each and every one of us realizes that we are all idiots.

Offline erockrph

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 6229
  • Chepachet, RI
    • View Profile
    • The Hop WHisperer
Re: Fruity, tropical hop rhizomes I can actually get my hands on?
« Reply #12 on: March 04, 2016, 08:09:32 PM »
FWIW, the Meridian hops I got last year were crap.  I know erockrph loves them but mine were like mild nothingness, no sweet or fruity aroma to speak of at all whatsoever.  I think I ended up using them in a Belgian golden strong and I couldn't taste anything from them in that beer either.
Interesting you mention that, because the last beer I brewed with them was underwhelming in the stone fruit character compared to what i was expecting. I believe these were the first ones I've used from the most recent crop year. Maybe there was a bad season on Meridian.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline HoosierBrew

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 13030
  • Indianapolis,IN
    • View Profile
Re: Fruity, tropical hop rhizomes I can actually get my hands on?
« Reply #13 on: March 04, 2016, 08:14:51 PM »
Oh, absolutely.  Hops can vary a LOT in character depending on where they're grown.  Also the amount of sun/clouds/shade and rain have huge effects as well.  Hops are very sensitive to microclimate and soil conditions, no doubt about it.


+1. Makes a huge difference. When the hops are harvested is thought to make a big difference as well.
Jon H.

Online hopfenundmalz

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 8981
  • Milford, MI
    • View Profile
Re: Fruity, tropical hop rhizomes I can actually get my hands on?
« Reply #14 on: March 05, 2016, 01:36:56 PM »
I'm in a similar boat. I grew hops for a couple of years when I first started brewing, but I ended up growing varietals that I don't really have an interest in brewing with. I decided to restart 2-3 plants this season, but I've been looking for something that I'm actually going to want to use. Cascade and Centennial don't do much for me, since every commercial brewery has used these to death. I'm definitely going to grow Sterling, since I use it in my lagers quite a bit. My others are going to be two of the following:

Sorachi Ace
Crystal
Glacier
Pacific Gem
Kent Golding

I'm leaning towards Sorachi (from Farmhouse Brewing Supply) and Pacific Gem (from Great Lakes Hops), right now. But Kent Golding is tempting to try since I often brew English ales over the winter.

Good luck on the Goldings. It has been said that Goldings needs long days like in England to do well, I am a little north of you at 42.3o Latitude, and my Goldings never produced more than a small handful of puny cones. I ripped it out.
Jeff Rankert
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
AHA Governing Committee
BJCP National
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!