Author Topic: DI Water  (Read 2874 times)

elemenop

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DI Water
« on: February 10, 2016, 07:05:13 PM »
I've been using DI water as the basis for brewing but have recently been told that the DI resin beads have a chance of getting into the final water and that they are not food safe. 

I want to continue to use DI water (reefer) therefore what type of filter can I place after the two DI filters to keep these beads from passing through?

Are there any other (safety) concerns with using DI water?

Offline flbrewer

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Re: DI Water
« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2016, 09:49:45 PM »
What's DI water?

Offline blatz

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Re: DI Water
« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2016, 09:55:41 PM »
What's DI water?

deionized

I'm waiting to see a response from a water expert on this thread though - I've never of this resin beads issue - I know a few pro breweries locally that use DI since its less waste (I think) than an RO system.
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Offline mabrungard

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Re: DI Water
« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2016, 10:26:38 PM »
DI is an expensive way to produce un-mineralized water. If your end use requires ion-free water, then its worth it. In the case of brewing, we want a certain ionic content to the water to give some flavor effect to the beer. I've tasted beers brewed with straight RO or distilled water and can attest that they are, in fact, bland.

All the DI columns that I've ever used, had secure screens at the outlets that prevent the resin beads from leaving the vessel. I wouldn't worry about that. 
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elemenop

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Re: DI Water
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2016, 12:21:13 AM »
I've always used my DI water and added salts, though I haven't noticed any blandness.

A valve could be installed before the DI unit and just use the RO water but it's already producing DI for my reef tank.

As long as the screens stop all of the beads then I won't worry about it.

After a quick Internet search I've found this blurb:

Quote
Warning: Spectrapure does not recommend drinking water produced from deionization (DI) as DI resins are typically not made of food grade approved material.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2016, 12:23:44 AM by elemenop »

Offline kramerog

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Re: DI Water
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2016, 03:14:13 AM »
There is no market for DI for drinking water purposes so there is no reason to get an approval for the resin.  I wouldn't worry about the lack of approval.

Offline Stevie

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Re: DI Water
« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2016, 04:03:30 AM »

There is no market for DI for drinking water purposes so there is no reason to get an approval for the resin.  I wouldn't worry about the lack of approval.
Just about every whole foods and hippie co-op I have ever been to sells both RO and DI. Somebody is buying it.

Offline blatz

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Re: DI Water
« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2016, 04:04:21 AM »
Is there really a big diff between RO and DI?
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Offline Bob357

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Re: DI Water
« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2016, 04:08:11 AM »
Just out of curiosity, is there any advantage to using DI over RO for brewing that substantiates the cost?
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Offline kramerog

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Re: DI Water
« Reply #9 on: February 11, 2016, 05:08:10 AM »

There is no market for DI for drinking water purposes so there is no reason to get an approval for the resin.  I wouldn't worry about the lack of approval.
Just about every whole foods and hippie co-op I have ever been to sells both RO and DI. Somebody is buying it.
I've only seen DI in chem labs.

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Offline kramerog

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Re: DI Water
« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2016, 05:14:55 AM »
Is there really a big diff between RO and DI?
It is useful in labs, electronic fabs, & some chemical plants.

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elemenop

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Re: DI Water
« Reply #11 on: February 11, 2016, 02:38:37 PM »
Is there really a big diff between RO and DI?

DI water isn't the same as distilled water or even RO water.

1.) Deionized water vs distilled water – DI water is as pure as the distilled water or even purer (oils etc.. can make it through the distillation process);

2.) Reverse osmosis water vs distilled water – RO water is more saturated with salts and oxygen than the distilled water and DI water;

3.) Reverse osmosis and deionization are a more cost-effective than the distillation.

There can be bacteria living in RO/DI water as it is not sterilized (like distilled water).  UV sterilization tubes kill these bacteria (boiling wort and the process of making beer does the same).

Any of these water types will work for brewing as long as the appropriate salts are added back to the water.

The "cost" for me is justified by my reef tank.  It really isn't a big cost because I buy the beads in bulk and repack the filters.

For brewing, RO water will suffice but it really is a matter of what you enjoy doing and perhaps your circumstance and environment.  Which one makes the best beer?  None.  Making the beer is an exercise left to the user.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2016, 02:45:36 PM by elemenop »

elemenop

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Re: DI Water
« Reply #12 on: February 11, 2016, 02:43:42 PM »
There is no market for DI for drinking water purposes so there is no reason to get an approval for the resin.  I wouldn't worry about the lack of approval.

My suspicions exactly.