Author Topic: Pin lock kegs and pressure bleed valves  (Read 1844 times)

Offline Phil_M

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1706
  • Southern Maryland
    • View Profile
Pin lock kegs and pressure bleed valves
« on: February 15, 2016, 05:23:29 PM »
I've got 4 kegs right now, two ball lock and two pin lock. The ball lock kegs have bleeder valves in the lid, whereas the pin lock kegs have some sort of pressure relief valve built into the lid.

What are my options, short of buying new lids, to try and retrofit these pin lock kegs with a bleeder valve?
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline jeffy

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3480
  • Tampa, Fl
    • View Profile
Re: Pin lock kegs and pressure bleed valves
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2016, 08:42:18 PM »
I've got 4 kegs right now, two ball lock and two pin lock. The ball lock kegs have bleeder valves in the lid, whereas the pin lock kegs have some sort of pressure relief valve built into the lid.

What are my options, short of buying new lids, to try and retrofit these pin lock kegs with a bleeder valve?
Although bleeder valves are convenient, they are not necessary.  On a pin lock keg, just depress the gas poppet to relieve pressure (unless it is full to the top).
Jeff Gladish, Tampa (989.3, 175.1 Apparent Rennarian)
Homebrewing since 1990
AHA member since 1991, now a lifetime member
BJCP judge since 1995

Offline Stevie

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 6858
    • View Profile
Re: Pin lock kegs and pressure bleed valves
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2016, 08:44:00 PM »

I've got 4 kegs right now, two ball lock and two pin lock. The ball lock kegs have bleeder valves in the lid, whereas the pin lock kegs have some sort of pressure relief valve built into the lid.

What are my options, short of buying new lids, to try and retrofit these pin lock kegs with a bleeder valve?
Although bleeder valves are convenient, they are not necessary.  On a pin lock keg, just depress the gas poppet to relieve pressure (unless it is full to the top).
+1 - if you really want one, AIH has complete lids for a reasonable price.

Offline Phil_M

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1706
  • Southern Maryland
    • View Profile
Re: Pin lock kegs and pressure bleed valves
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2016, 10:03:09 PM »
That's basically what I've been doing. I've got a extra gas tap that I've removed the locking collar from in such a way that I just press it on the poppet to release the pressure.

My thought is that if the CO2 is stratified and on the bottom layer, then you're bleeding off more CO2 than air. There's a rather large air space above the bottom og the gas dip tube.

Probably isn't a big deal, but I figured if there was an easy solution out there that didn't break the bank...
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline jeffy

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3480
  • Tampa, Fl
    • View Profile
Re: Pin lock kegs and pressure bleed valves
« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2016, 10:54:55 PM »
That's basically what I've been doing. I've got a extra gas tap that I've removed the locking collar from in such a way that I just press it on the poppet to release the pressure.

My thought is that if the CO2 is stratified and on the bottom layer, then you're bleeding off more CO2 than air. There's a rather large air space above the bottom og the gas dip tube.

Probably isn't a big deal, but I figured if there was an easy solution out there that didn't break the bank...
Not sure I understand.  There should be no air in the keg - only CO2.  Gasses don't really stratify after they have been mixed; they blend.  Good kegging practices should mean very little to no air inside.
Jeff Gladish, Tampa (989.3, 175.1 Apparent Rennarian)
Homebrewing since 1990
AHA member since 1991, now a lifetime member
BJCP judge since 1995

Offline Phil_M

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1706
  • Southern Maryland
    • View Profile
Re: Pin lock kegs and pressure bleed valves
« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2016, 11:09:48 PM »
Correct, but how mixed are they? While I try and purge kegs before filling, I don't always. Even if I do purge a keg, I'd assume there's some air in the keg based on the law of partial pressures.

I'm sure the effects of all this are all down in the "noise" though. Add to that most beers I brew are English styles and aren't as O2 critical as something like an American IPA.

I was just looking for a simpler way to vent the keg from the top of the keg lid, rather than a few inches down. It just makes more sense to vent from a different spot than when you fill. Plus, it allows me to hook up the gas in line once, rather than hook up gas/hook up bleeder tap/repeat.
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline wingnut

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 357
  • Plainwell MI
    • View Profile
Re: Pin lock kegs and pressure bleed valves
« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2016, 12:01:59 PM »
I have all pin locks... always just filled the head space with CO2 pressure 3 or 4 times after filling and opened the gas post with a screw driver to purge. 

Seems to work plenty good. 
-- Wingnut - Cheers!

Offline stpug

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 705
    • View Profile
Re: Pin lock kegs and pressure bleed valves
« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2016, 03:34:30 PM »
I've got 4 kegs right now, two ball lock and two pin lock. The ball lock kegs have bleeder valves in the lid, whereas the pin lock kegs have some sort of pressure relief valve built into the lid.

What are my options, short of buying new lids, to try and retrofit these pin lock kegs with a bleeder valve?

Probably the easiest, no-extra-anything needed method is to simply connect the gas to it's post at lowish psi (4-5psi) while keeping the lid slightly cracked. The gas will flow and be released out the cracked lid. When you feel you've wasted enough co2 simply pull up on the lid and lock it down; now turn up your pressure to seal the lid. Done!

My method: Using an adapted airgun on my co2 tank, with a cracked lid I blow out the headspace for several seconds with the air gun at low psi (4-5psi). After wasting enough co2, I seal the lid and attached the gas via post. The proceed to pressure-vent a few more times. Works for me.