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Author Topic: Attention To Detail - Differences in Final Product  (Read 9691 times)

hawkeye

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Re: Attention To Detail - Differences in Final Product
« Reply #15 on: February 28, 2016, 07:59:17 pm »
I don't think it is that difficult to brew decent beer.

Exactly. this isn't brain science or rocket surgery. It is like cooking. You either get it or you don't. You pay attention to the details to make the best beer you can make. If you care you'll make good beer. If you don't you won't.

Yup.  But can you taste the difference?!

Offline majorvices

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Re: Attention To Detail - Differences in Final Product
« Reply #16 on: February 28, 2016, 08:03:28 pm »
I don't think it is that difficult to brew decent beer.

Exactly. this isn't brain science or rocket surgery. It is like cooking. You either get it or you don't. You pay attention to the details to make the best beer you can make. If you care you'll make good beer. If you don't you won't.

Yup.  But can you taste the difference?!

Obviously. There are no dumb questions. Except this one. ;)

hawkeye

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Re: Attention To Detail - Differences in Final Product
« Reply #17 on: February 28, 2016, 08:16:38 pm »
Two beers, from the same ingredients that taste noticeably different due to eliminating "unnecessary steps" during the process. Hrm... not so sure, but I'm sure that experiment's been done before... or not.

Offline majorvices

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Re: Attention To Detail - Differences in Final Product
« Reply #18 on: February 28, 2016, 08:19:16 pm »
Two beers, from the same ingredients that taste noticeably different due to eliminating "unnecessary steps" during the process. Hrm... not so sure, but I'm sure that experiment's been done before... or not.

If you make an omelette and cook it two different ways you make two different omelettes.

hawkeye

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Re: Attention To Detail - Differences in Final Product
« Reply #19 on: February 28, 2016, 08:23:08 pm »
Two beers, from the same ingredients that taste noticeably different due to eliminating "unnecessary steps" during the process. Hrm... not so sure, but I'm sure that experiment's been done before... or not.

If you make an omelette and cook it two different ways you make two different omelettes.

Yea, but beer's perhaps a different animal.  Leave out a whirlfloc tablet can you taste a difference?  I suppose if you keep leaving things out the difference might become noticeable but I'm not overly convinced.

Offline pete b

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Re: Attention To Detail - Differences in Final Product
« Reply #20 on: February 28, 2016, 08:23:36 pm »
Two beers, from the same ingredients that taste noticeably different due to eliminating "unnecessary steps" during the process. Hrm... not so sure, but I'm sure that experiment's been done before... or not.

If you make an omelette and cook it two different ways you make two different omelettes.
That's so deep man.  8)
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Offline majorvices

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Re: Attention To Detail - Differences in Final Product
« Reply #21 on: February 28, 2016, 08:25:11 pm »
Two beers, from the same ingredients that taste noticeably different due to eliminating "unnecessary steps" during the process. Hrm... not so sure, but I'm sure that experiment's been done before... or not.

If you make an omelette and cook it two different ways you make two different omelettes.

Yea, but beer's perhaps a different animal.  Leave out a whirlfloc tablet can you taste a difference?  I suppose if you keep leaving things out the difference might become noticeable but I'm not overly convinced.

If you are hung up on whirlflock as final say on beer quality you really are missing the point.

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Attention To Detail - Differences in Final Product
« Reply #22 on: February 28, 2016, 08:30:04 pm »
I build my recipes on software but prefer to round things off to the nearest 1/4 pound, except for color grains then they are rounded off to nearest ounce. I weigh on a dial scale that is probably accurate to +/- 2 ounces. I mill it as tight as I can without stopping the rollers. I build my water using salts weighed to the nearest gram, and acids to the nearest 1/2 ml. I heat my strike water to nearest whole degree. If my mash temp drops four degrees I'll heat it back up. I time my boils. I usually take an OG reading. I don't count yeast cells. I pitch active starters, rather than measure cell counts. I chill to at or below pitching temp. I ferment in dual stage temp controlled chest freezer, normally within a degree or two of target temp, measured off actual beer temp. I force carb based on temp and pressure, but I dont measure actual volumes of co2. I usually measure ph with a meter thats only good +/- .2 ph. I measure ph all the way through on new recipes, but only final ph on repeats.

To me, my method is not meticulously OCD, and not sloppy. Somewhere in the middle.

Offline AmandaK

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Re: Attention To Detail - Differences in Final Product
« Reply #23 on: February 28, 2016, 08:30:43 pm »
Yes, you (read: "I" in this case) can taste a difference. That is why I am anal about my own brewing. If I didn't think it was worth it, I wouldn't be so particular about it. Logic checks, right guys? Ha.

And no, I haven't done a blind triangle. ;)
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Offline pete b

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Re: Attention To Detail - Differences in Final Product
« Reply #24 on: February 28, 2016, 08:52:59 pm »
I don't doubt the anal approach (what did I just say there?) but I am kind of playing devil's advocate and defending my own approach at the same time. I think that people were making consistently good beer well before a hydrometer or the ph scale existed. Once familiar with the measurements and procedures one can do it your own way.
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Offline euge

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Re: Attention To Detail - Differences in Final Product
« Reply #25 on: February 28, 2016, 09:29:41 pm »
I don't doubt the anal approach (what did I just say there?) but I am kind of playing devil's advocate and defending my own approach at the same time. I think that people were making consistently good beer well before a hydrometer or the ph scale existed. Once familiar with the measurements and procedures one can do it your own way.

The thermometer is probably the greatest equalizer in brewing. Revolutionary.

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Offline yso191

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Re: Attention To Detail - Differences in Final Product
« Reply #26 on: February 28, 2016, 09:36:10 pm »
For sure. I use my touch of OCD to my advantage ;D. I do agree that it's not hard to make good beer. Consistently really good, another story. Every time I make a beer I ask myself "Would I pay $ for this?". If the answer is no, I'm pissed. There's room for lots of approaches.

I brew for my taste, but the test I have, known only to myself and my wife, is this:  When family and friends come over I show them the taps I have brewed and a well stocked beer fridge.  I am successful when they choose my beer over the commercial stuff.  Only recently have I been successful in this regard.
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Re: Attention To Detail - Differences in Final Product
« Reply #27 on: February 28, 2016, 10:12:58 pm »
So if the same beer were brewed both ways could they be distinguished in a triangle test?

If they could be, they wouldn't be the same beer.
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Offline Stevie

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Attention To Detail - Differences in Final Product
« Reply #28 on: February 28, 2016, 10:17:13 pm »
Some things that I've seen omitted (or not done due to lack of ingredient/equipment/knowledge but still made drinkable beer):

1.) Whirlfloc/Irish Moss
2.) Hydrometer readings (OG and FG!)
3.) Fermentation Temperature measurements (still fermented in an area that's at an acceptable temp)
4.) Yeast Nutrient
5.) Pitching Temperature measurement
6.) pH
7.) Water Adjustments

There's probably more but I guess beer is versatile like that.
I do all this stuff and consider myself pretty casual. As Keith says, making beer ain't hard.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2016, 10:21:20 pm by Steve in TX »

Offline 69franx

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Re: Attention To Detail - Differences in Final Product
« Reply #29 on: February 28, 2016, 10:22:43 pm »
Some things that I've seen omitted (or not done due to lack of ingredient/equipment/knowledge but still made drinkable beer):

1.) Whirlfloc/Irish Moss
2.) Hydrometer readings (OG and FG!)
3.) Fermentation Temperature measurements (still fermented in an area that's at an acceptable temp)
4.) Yeast Nutrient
5.) Pitching Temperature measurement
6.) pH
7.) Water Adjustments

There's probably more but I guess beer is versatile like that.
I do all this stuff and consider myself pretty casual. As Keith says, making beer ain't hard.
right there with you Steve
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