Author Topic: Long Lag time  (Read 1214 times)

Offline dramsey

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Long Lag time
« on: March 04, 2016, 12:26:44 AM »
Ive got a Rye IPA extract kit in my primary right now. I brewed on Sunday afternoon and Im just starting to see some activity in my air-lock. The wort was chilled to 80 before I pitched my dry yeast which was not rehydrated. What will be the biggest side effects to my finished beer with such a long lag time? Thanks for the help!

Offline duboman

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Re: Long Lag time
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2016, 12:57:16 AM »
In a bucket? Did you check for krausen prior to activity in airlock? How much head space? Its possible that fermentation had started earlier but the pressure has just built up enough to show airlock activity if there is a fair amount of headspace, or if you had a poor seal on the lid

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Offline euge

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Re: Long Lag time
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2016, 02:46:00 AM »
Hmmm. Perhaps the yeast packet was bad. A kit you say...?
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Offline mainebrewer

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Re: Long Lag time
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2016, 11:25:02 AM »
If you are fermenting in a bucket, I'd go with the leaky lid. It happens a lot.
If your sanitation procedures are good, you shouldn't see any serious impact on your beer.
Personally, rather than waiting 4 days, I would have pitched some more yeast at the 48 hour mark.
You didn't ask, but starting fermentation at 80 degrees is about 15 degrees to high.
Fermenting at high temps will have a much larger negative impact on your beer than a long lag time.
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Offline majorvices

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Re: Long Lag time
« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2016, 11:30:28 AM »
+1 - beat me to it as I was typing.

Offline dramsey

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Re: Long Lag time
« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2016, 11:40:35 AM »
I am fermenting in a bucket. It has about 4" of head space. I also stored the yeast in the fridge for several weeks before and brewing and set it out during my boil which was a packet of Lellemand BRY-97 American West Coast. I wish I would have had an extra packet to pitch. Lesson learned to have extra on hand. Thanks for all the input!

Offline PORTERHAUS

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Re: Long Lag time
« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2016, 12:39:05 PM »
I am fermenting in a bucket. It has about 4" of head space. I also stored the yeast in the fridge for several weeks before and brewing and set it out during my boil which was a packet of Lellemand BRY-97 American West Coast. I wish I would have had an extra packet to pitch. Lesson learned to have extra on hand. Thanks for all the input!

There are a couple factors right there that will add to lag time. Often I notice more lag time when I do not rehydrate. I sometimes see more lag time fermenting in my buckets than my carboys and yes that seems to come down to extra headspace. But Bry-97 itself is a slow starter. I usually have no less than 24 hrs lag time. But I usually rehydrate and it still is slow to ake off. I just used it myself in a Pale Ale on Monday. I pitched at 66* with one not rehydrated packet and didnt see airlock activity until Wed morning. A lot of factors come into play with lag time. Usually just when you start to panic it finally gets going. Just be patient, things are happening during that lag time and with Bry-97 especially it likes to take its time.

Offline PORTERHAUS

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Re: Long Lag time
« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2016, 12:49:35 PM »
But also it you havent used it before Bry-97 is a nice yeast. It gets the job done quick once it does start going and clea4s really well. Has a bit of a different profile than say US-05 or other West Coast strains. I like it in hoppy beers.

Offline rob_f

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Re: Long Lag time
« Reply #8 on: March 05, 2016, 04:11:33 PM »
I like BRY-97 for hoppy ales as well, but I'm always prepared for a longer lag time with it.
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Offline majorvices

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Re: Long Lag time
« Reply #9 on: March 05, 2016, 04:16:25 PM »
I am fermenting in a bucket. It has about 4" of head space. I also stored the yeast in the fridge for several weeks before and brewing and set it out during my boil which was a packet of Lellemand BRY-97 American West Coast. I wish I would have had an extra packet to pitch. Lesson learned to have extra on hand. Thanks for all the input!

Are you missing the part about bucket seals leaking? Are you looking for bubbles in airlock as sign of fermentation? Pop the lid and look if you haven't already.

Offline Steve Ruch

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Re: Long Lag time
« Reply #10 on: March 06, 2016, 05:00:52 PM »
What will be the biggest side effects to my finished beer with such a long lag time?

Not much, if your cleaning and sanitizing was top notch.
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Offline euge

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Re: Long Lag time
« Reply #11 on: March 06, 2016, 09:39:23 PM »
Should have beer by now.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

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