Author Topic: APA  (Read 1126 times)

Offline Phil_M

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APA
« on: March 11, 2016, 01:24:12 PM »
Brewing again tomorrow to try and collect more numbers to baseline my new mash tun.

Thinking of a basic APA. I'm hoping for a crisp, dry beer with a good amount of bitterness. I think this may be bordering on IPA territory, and that's even more reason for me to try and dry it out.

OG: 1.058
75% Briess Pale Ale Malt
7.5% Weyermann Munich 10L
7.5% Briess Caramel 60L
10% Invert No. 1 syrup

I plan on mashing at 152, I don't want the beer to be too thin. I'm hoping that the syrup and higher mash temp could work together to make a beer that doesn't have a thin mouthfeel, yet is still dry?

Hops:

FWH: ~10 IBU Crystal (bitterness calculated as a 20 minute boil addition.)
20 min: 20 IBU Simcoe
20 min: 15 IBU Columbus
Flameout: 1 oz. Cascade

I don't plan on doing a whirlpool for this beer. I might consider hitting it with an ounce of either simcoe or cascade in the keg.

Yeast will likely be fresh 1450 from the Mild that I'll also be kegging tomorrow. Should I just rack on top of the old yeast cake? That's what I did with the mild. Or pour out a measured amount of slurry and use that? This APA would be the third pitch of this 1450.

And thanks to all the folks who help look over recipes, it's a nice "safety net" to know the beer won't be horrible.
« Last Edit: March 11, 2016, 01:26:06 PM by Phil_M »
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline BrodyR

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Re: APA
« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2016, 02:13:33 PM »
I would probably measure out some slurry using a yeast pitch calculator. Overpitching is supposed to lead to thin tasting beer. I've noticed that when tasting FFT samples.

Recently I started using Wyeast 1469 (West Yorkshire - T. Taylor) and open fermenting/top cropping it and it's been awesome. I'm only a few batches in with it so far but I'm getting a ton of clean healthy yeast off the crop, storing it under beer in a sanitized mason jar, and plan on continuing to use it for all my ale fermentations. Seems to be the best way to keep an ale strain going.

The Belgium's do the whole using a lot of sugar while still leaving nice mouthfeel thing well. The step mashes they employ may be part of the equation.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: APA
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2016, 02:17:07 PM »
I would probably measure out some slurry using a yeast pitch calculator.


+1.  You definitely wouldn't need the whole yeast cake for an APA. Mr Malty's calc is pretty good for that. Probably more like 1/3 to 1/2 would do great.
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Offline neddles

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Re: APA
« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2016, 02:27:15 PM »
I would probably measure out some slurry using a yeast pitch calculator. Overpitching is supposed to lead to thin tasting beer. I've noticed that when tasting FFT samples.

Recently I started using Wyeast 1469 (West Yorkshire - T. Taylor) and open fermenting/top cropping it and it's been awesome. I'm only a few batches in with it so far but I'm getting a ton of clean healthy yeast off the crop, storing it under beer in a sanitized mason jar, and plan on continuing to use it for all my ale fermentations. Seems to be the best way to keep an ale strain going.

That's a great yeast for sure. I have done the same top cropping of 1469 with success. One thing that I and another brewer from another forum noticed is that it seems to stop forming that great croppable mat of yeast in successive generations. I have seen it twice now. The resulting beers were as good if not better than others and they attenuated as expected so I am not convinced it is a problem for anything other than continued top cropping. Just a point of interest and I would be curious to see if anyone else noticed it. Carry on.

Offline denny

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Re: APA
« Reply #4 on: March 11, 2016, 03:59:33 PM »
1/3 of the 1450 slurry will be just about right.
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Offline BrodyR

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Re: APA
« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2016, 04:27:25 PM »
I would probably measure out some slurry using a yeast pitch calculator. Overpitching is supposed to lead to thin tasting beer. I've noticed that when tasting FFT samples.

Recently I started using Wyeast 1469 (West Yorkshire - T. Taylor) and open fermenting/top cropping it and it's been awesome. I'm only a few batches in with it so far but I'm getting a ton of clean healthy yeast off the crop, storing it under beer in a sanitized mason jar, and plan on continuing to use it for all my ale fermentations. Seems to be the best way to keep an ale strain going.

That's a great yeast for sure. I have done the same top cropping of 1469 with success. One thing that I and another brewer from another forum noticed is that it seems to stop forming that great croppable mat of yeast in successive generations. I have seen it twice now. The resulting beers were as good if not better than others and they attenuated as expected so I am not convinced it is a problem for anything other than continued top cropping. Just a point of interest and I would be curious to see if anyone else noticed it. Carry on.

Interesting, I'll post about it if I notice that as well. Wonder if open fermenting will affect it.

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Re: APA
« Reply #6 on: March 11, 2016, 04:28:23 PM »

Offline goschman

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Re: APA
« Reply #7 on: March 11, 2016, 04:52:09 PM »
Out of curiosity is there any reason you are using the crystal for bittering?
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Offline Phil_M

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Re: APA
« Reply #8 on: March 11, 2016, 05:01:10 PM »
Out of curiosity is there any reason you are using the crystal for bittering?

Kinda just feel like it. It's descended from hallertau, with some cascade in the lineage as well. I know that some folks like to bitter with noble hops, and figured why not try it?

As far as top cropping 1469, should top cropping lead to a culture that wants to top crop even more? You're essentially only harvesting the cells that want to crop up the most.

And I still think Fast Fourier Transform whenever I see FFT.
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline Stevie

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Re: APA
« Reply #9 on: March 11, 2016, 05:04:41 PM »
Crazy low alpha is the only reason I wouldn't use it for bittering. I think my current crop is about 2% AA

Offline neddles

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Re: APA
« Reply #10 on: March 11, 2016, 05:09:34 PM »

[/quote]

Interesting, I'll post about it if I notice that as well. Wonder if open fermenting will affect it.
[/quote]
Good question, hard to say. I should mention then that none of mine were open fermented.

Offline Phil_M

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Re: APA
« Reply #11 on: March 11, 2016, 05:12:45 PM »
Crazy low alpha is the only reason I wouldn't use it for bittering. I think my current crop is about 2% AA

I think the crystal I have is 3.7% AA? It's from the 2014 crop. I've stored it vacuum sealed in the freezer, so it's still good.
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline jmitchell3

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Re: APA
« Reply #12 on: March 11, 2016, 08:26:02 PM »
Won't fwh bittering be the same IBU contribution as full boil addition?


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Offline denny

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Re: APA
« Reply #13 on: March 11, 2016, 08:56:37 PM »
Won't fwh bittering be the same IBU contribution as full boil addition?


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Testing I've done shows about a 10% increase in IBU.  But many people, including myself, think it tastes less bitter than a 60 min. addition, even though it measures higher.
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Offline jmitchell3

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Re: APA
« Reply #14 on: March 11, 2016, 09:52:11 PM »

Won't fwh bittering be the same IBU contribution as full boil addition?


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Testing I've done shows about a 10% increase in IBU.  But many people, including myself, think it tastes less bitter than a 60 min. addition, even though it measures higher.

Yeah I think Beeralchemy shows it as the same. However OP indicates he's treating it like a 20 min addition. BA is showing using Tinseth changing a 60 min addition to 20 mins is a 40% reduction in IBU, so that pretty dramatic.


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