Author Topic: Gravity contributions of Raisins, Dates and Figs?  (Read 1846 times)

Offline denny

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Re: Gravity contributions of Raisins, Dates and Figs?
« Reply #15 on: March 22, 2016, 05:00:30 PM »
Gotta say, I really like the date/fig/raisin/Turbinado idea. Personally, I would take the 'caramelize the fruit in wort, then puree' approach. I'll be curious to see how it comes out.

I'm trying to do something a bit original and different but keep in the spirit of the beers I love. 

I'm really chasing a certain flavor I got from the first Westmalle Dubbel I ever had. It looked as though it had been sitting on the shelf for ages, it was dusty, etc.

When I cracked it I got a sweet, chocolately, raisiny/figgy aroma that just knocked me out. The flavor was more of the same, much more than what you typically get with Westmalle. I really can't explain it all that great and it may have been in my mind or incorrect now that I've had so many of them.

Not that i'm restricting myself to just that.

That's the flavor you get from D180
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RPIScotty

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Re: Gravity contributions of Raisins, Dates and Figs?
« Reply #16 on: March 22, 2016, 05:03:44 PM »
Gotta say, I really like the date/fig/raisin/Turbinado idea. Personally, I would take the 'caramelize the fruit in wort, then puree' approach. I'll be curious to see how it comes out.

I'm trying to do something a bit original and different but keep in the spirit of the beers I love. 

I'm really chasing a certain flavor I got from the first Westmalle Dubbel I ever had. It looked as though it had been sitting on the shelf for ages, it was dusty, etc.

When I cracked it I got a sweet, chocolately, raisiny/figgy aroma that just knocked me out. The flavor was more of the same, much more than what you typically get with Westmalle. I really can't explain it all that great and it may have been in my mind or incorrect now that I've had so many of them.

Not that i'm restricting myself to just that.

That's the flavor you get from D180

Maybe. The syrup itself yes. This was something altogether different in my opinion and unlike anything I've tasted in a finished beer. I've tasted very close to it (my Westmalle experience) in other beers but never equalled it.

Like I said, this was a long time ago and maybe i've just built this up in my head.

You're 100% right though about the D180. It has all of that in the syrup form.
« Last Edit: March 22, 2016, 05:05:54 PM by RPIScotty »

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Gravity contributions of Raisins, Dates and Figs?
« Reply #17 on: March 22, 2016, 05:09:44 PM »
Would there be any advantages other than increased sugars if mashed?

Why would mashing make any difference?  And good point about straight sugar, Dave.

I'd never thought about this until yesterday, but considering that the dried fruits contain more carbohydrates than simple sugars, if you mashed with enzymes, these carbs (i.e., starches) should theoretically be convertable just like we all do with malt, converting starches to sugars.  Raw malt is sweet, but gets much sweeter with mashing, etc.  So, why should fruits with extra starches be any different?!?!
Dave

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Offline denny

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Re: Gravity contributions of Raisins, Dates and Figs?
« Reply #18 on: March 22, 2016, 05:33:07 PM »
Would there be any advantages other than increased sugars if mashed?

Why would mashing make any difference?  And good point about straight sugar, Dave.

I'd never thought about this until yesterday, but considering that the dried fruits contain more carbohydrates than simple sugars, if you mashed with enzymes, these carbs (i.e., starches) should theoretically be convertable just like we all do with malt, converting starches to sugars.  Raw malt is sweet, but gets much sweeter with mashing, etc.  So, why should fruits with extra starches be any different?!?!

Who knows?  Sounds like an experiment!
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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RPIScotty

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Re: Gravity contributions of Raisins, Dates and Figs?
« Reply #19 on: March 22, 2016, 05:34:42 PM »
Would there be any advantages other than increased sugars if mashed?

Why would mashing make any difference?  And good point about straight sugar, Dave.

I'd never thought about this until yesterday, but considering that the dried fruits contain more carbohydrates than simple sugars, if you mashed with enzymes, these carbs (i.e., starches) should theoretically be convertable just like we all do with malt, converting starches to sugars.  Raw malt is sweet, but gets much sweeter with mashing, etc.  So, why should fruits with extra starches be any different?!?!

Who knows?  Sounds like an experiment!

I'm game!

Offline fmader

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Re: Gravity contributions of Raisins, Dates and Figs?
« Reply #20 on: March 22, 2016, 05:46:46 PM »
Gotta say, I really like the date/fig/raisin/Turbinado idea. Personally, I would take the 'caramelize the fruit in wort, then puree' approach. I'll be curious to see how it comes out.

I did this with raisins, dates, dried cherries, and prunes..... Needless to say, the beer did not advance lol
Frank

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Gravity contributions of Raisins, Dates and Figs?
« Reply #21 on: March 22, 2016, 05:52:02 PM »
Gotta say, I really like the date/fig/raisin/Turbinado idea. Personally, I would take the 'caramelize the fruit in wort, then puree' approach. I'll be curious to see how it comes out.

I did this with raisins, dates, dried cherries, and prunes..... Needless to say, the beer did not advance lol



Always a crap shoot. I'm betting it was killer.
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RPIScotty

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Re: Gravity contributions of Raisins, Dates and Figs?
« Reply #22 on: March 22, 2016, 06:05:18 PM »
As of right now i'm thinking the following:

50/50 split of Pils/Pale       65%
Dark Munich                     12%
Torrified Wheat                  3%
Turbinado                         10%
Raisin/Date/Figs                10%

3787 and Cascade leaf hops