Author Topic: Test #2  (Read 1550 times)

Offline Phil_M

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Test #2
« on: March 26, 2016, 01:33:16 AM »
This is my second brew to collect data on my new batch sparge/cooler setup.

Kitchen Sink Saison (AKA, brew with what you've got.)
90% Briess Pale Ale Malt
10% Briess Flaked Barley
30 IBUs EKG @ 60 min
5 IBU fuggles @ 10 min

My fuggles have an AA of 3.3, otherwise I'd use them to bitter.

So here's the question for this brew, what sort of final gravity can I expect with Wyeast 3724? Plan right now is to mash at 146oF for 2 hours, to wring everything out of it that I can. Unnecessary? You tell me, that's why I'm asking.
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline euge

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2016, 01:40:56 AM »
IIRC this strain likes to stall in the upper 1.020's so perhaps a bump in temp to finish it.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2016, 01:46:15 AM »
This is my second brew to collect data on my new batch sparge/cooler setup.

Kitchen Sink Saison (AKA, brew with what you've got.)
90% Briess Pale Ale Malt
10% Briess Flaked Barley
30 IBUs EKG @ 60 min
5 IBU fuggles @ 10 min

My fuggles have an AA of 3.3, otherwise I'd use them to bitter.

So here's the question for this brew, what sort of final gravity can I expect with Wyeast 3724? Plan right now is to mash at 146oF for 2 hours, to wring everything out of it that I can. Unnecessary? You tell me, that's why I'm asking.


I mash saison 147F/90 mins and have gotten 3724 down to 1.002-1.003ish. The trick is not to stall it. Drew's trick of covering the airlock with foil for the first few days helps , as 3724 is supposedly pressure sensitive. Definitely want to ramp it up after the first few days. Lately I've gotten back to waiting until the 3724 starts to slow down noticeably and pitching some 3711 (or even Belle Saison) to finish the job and prevent a stall. Keeps you from needing to ramp up so high and adds complexity, as 3711 is a beast that pretty much wants to finish at or near 1.002. Lots of approaches.
Jon H.

Offline Phil_M

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2016, 02:02:51 AM »
The issue with 3711 is that I don't like it…at all. :/

I suppose if it stalls terribly or finishes too high, I can dump some Brett B in it and let it it ride with that.

Plan is no airlock for 2-3 days, and start ramping up the temp at about the same time.

That being said, I'll use your 147/90 minute mash.
« Last Edit: March 26, 2016, 02:12:16 AM by Phil_M »
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2016, 02:13:13 AM »
The issue with 3711 is that I don't like it…at all. :/


I like 3724 much better myself. But after giving 3724 a few days to eat sugar and set its flavor profile, the 3711 takes a supporting role in terms of flavor FWIW. More there as a 'relief pitcher'.
Jon H.

Offline Phil_M

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #5 on: March 26, 2016, 02:30:37 AM »
Someone posted one of Drew's Maltose Falcon blog posts, where he mentioned using 3724 and WLP565…would that help? Or are the two too similar, both likely to lag out?

The last time I used 3724, the beer finished at 1.003, but that recipe had a pound of D90 in it.
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #6 on: March 26, 2016, 02:36:04 AM »
I think 565 is a tad less likely to stall as quickly but will stall,too. The foil over the airlock helps. The two are supposedly (possibly) the two strains Dupont blends for their saison.
Jon H.

Offline Phil_M

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #7 on: March 26, 2016, 02:47:09 AM »
Then perhaps that's something to try next time around.

I think I'll use your mash schedule, try the foil, and ramp temps up, probably on day 3. If it doesn't finish dry enough, I'll pitch some brett b and adjust my timing/temps the next time around.
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #8 on: March 26, 2016, 02:51:16 AM »
Good luck. Be sure to post how it comes out.
Jon H.

Offline dilluh98

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #9 on: March 26, 2016, 12:55:52 PM »
With Drew's method and ramp schedule, I haven't had 565 stall ever on a saison up to a 1.065 OG. They typically end up in the 1.003 to 1.001 range. Finishing with 3711 will ensure you attenuate every last bit but it isn't absolutely necessary, IME. My opinion is that letting the beer sit for an extra 5-7 days beyond what you think will do the trick.

Offline narcout

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #10 on: March 26, 2016, 01:39:06 PM »
Running it really warm (like 90 degrees) the entire time also works.
It's too close to home
And it's too near the bone

Offline denny

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #11 on: March 26, 2016, 03:56:43 PM »
IIRC this strain likes to stall in the upper 1.020's so perhaps a bump in temp to finish it.

IIRC, 3724 is a variation of the Dupont yeast, which would mean it's sensitive to back pressure.  Try "open" fermentation, meaning no airlock, just foil over the fermenter opening.
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Offline denny

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #12 on: March 26, 2016, 03:57:30 PM »
Running it really warm (like 90 degrees) the entire time also works.

At the expense of flavor, IMO.  Drew and I discuss this on the podcast coming out Wed.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline narcout

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #13 on: March 26, 2016, 04:06:24 PM »
Running it really warm (like 90 degrees) the entire time also works.

At the expense of flavor, IMO.  Drew and I discuss this on the podcast coming out Wed.

I tried it and liked it.  Will listen to podcast
It's too close to home
And it's too near the bone

Offline denny

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #14 on: March 26, 2016, 04:25:09 PM »
Running it really warm (like 90 degrees) the entire time also works.

At the expense of flavor, IMO.  Drew and I discuss this on the podcast coming out Wed.

I tried it and liked it.  Will listen to podcast

Then you have decided for yourself.  Drew and I have the opposite opinion, but it's your beer.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell