Author Topic: suitable sub for wild hops  (Read 952 times)

Online BrewBama

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suitable sub for wild hops
« on: March 30, 2016, 11:22:03 PM »
In the Jan/Feb '16 edition of Zymurgy, Charlie P. has a Mild recipe that interests me.  As I read thru the ingredients I see "wild hops" as a steeping hop after boiling.  Now, where am I going to find wild hops in N AL?  What would I consider a suitable substitute?
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Offline tumarkin

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Re: suitable sub for wild hops
« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2016, 12:00:11 AM »
Maybe Cluster? That's a lot of what went wild from commercial hop crops early on - obviously not a native hop variety.
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Online BrewBama

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Re: suitable sub for wild hops
« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2016, 12:14:38 AM »
Maybe Cluster? That's a lot of what went wild from commercial hop crops early on - obviously not a native hop variety.

Ah... cool.  Thx
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Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: suitable sub for wild hops
« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2016, 02:54:36 PM »
At our latitude your chance of finding wild hops is fairly low.

I seem to recall there is a monastery in New Mexico growing and selling some of the wild new mexicanus varieties. Not sure if that is still going on or what their sales are like.
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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: suitable sub for wild hops
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2016, 03:00:50 PM »
At our latitude your chance of finding wild hops is fairly low.

I seem to recall there is a monastery in New Mexico growing and selling some of the wild new mexicanus varieties. Not sure if that is still going on or what their sales are like.


I checked that site yesterday. It says they're sold out on the 2015 crop completely. They obviously are pretty low volume starting out. So I guess it's fall before they have any more to sell.
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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: suitable sub for wild hops
« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2016, 03:24:24 PM »
Cluster is probably the best choice.  Also IMHO could add a touch of Chinook or Northern Brewer, just to simulate "wild" flavor, but go easy on those.  Use at least 75% Cluster with small amounts of the others IMHO.
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Online denny

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Re: suitable sub for wild hops
« Reply #6 on: March 31, 2016, 03:56:40 PM »
Maybe Cluster? That's a lot of what went wild from commercial hop crops early on - obviously not a native hop variety.

Pretty much only in the NE, though, AFAIK.  Cluster always gets suggested in these situations, but there's really no way of knowing.  There are different wild hops in every area of the country.
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Offline Pinski

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Re: suitable sub for wild hops
« Reply #7 on: March 31, 2016, 05:57:56 PM »
I still have yet to stumble across a bine of free range, "wild"/fugitive hops.  That will be a good day.
I was gonna say Cluster too, for reasons already mentioned.
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: suitable sub for wild hops
« Reply #8 on: March 31, 2016, 06:14:26 PM »
You might find some HBC-438 or Medusa, both have new-Mexicanus parentage.

Stan Hieronymus has written about the monks in NM. The Monastary is not too far from Ghost Ranch if you are ever out that way. I was with a group at Ghost Ranch, they were not as in to beer and brewing, so I didn't suggest going out there. That and the weather was terrible.


http://appellationbeer.com/blog/neomexicanus-hops-for-sale/

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Offline santoch

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Re: suitable sub for wild hops
« Reply #9 on: April 01, 2016, 03:07:45 AM »
Steve-
Come on up here to Snoqualmie.  There's a farmer's field that straddles the Snoqualmie/North Bend border.  Back in the 1880's and 1890's it used to be one of the biggest hop growing farms in the US. 

Along the sides of the roads surrounding that farm in late August/early September, you can pick all the wild hops that your heart desires.  They literally grow like weeds along the side of the road.

Aside from using improper terminology (vines instead of bines), its a neat little article: 
http://www.valleyrecord.com/news/176038051.html

Here's a painting of it:
http://www.meadowbrookfarmpreserve.org/graphics/photos/history_03_large.jpg

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Offline narvin

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Re: suitable sub for wild hops
« Reply #10 on: April 01, 2016, 04:23:47 AM »
Why not a traditional British hop for a mild?  Maybe try something less common like Bramling Cross.   I'm not sure what good an unknown wild hop does other than make the recipe sound interesting.
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Offline Hand of Dom

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Re: suitable sub for wild hops
« Reply #11 on: April 01, 2016, 09:47:08 AM »
Bramling Cross is a great hop.  I love using it in porters and stouts, and could see it working in something malty like a mild.
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Re: suitable sub for wild hops
« Reply #12 on: April 02, 2016, 12:39:22 AM »
That does sound interesting
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Offline Pinski

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Re: suitable sub for wild hops
« Reply #13 on: April 02, 2016, 07:20:26 AM »
Steve-
Come on up here to Snoqualmie.  There's a farmer's field that straddles the Snoqualmie/North Bend border.  Back in the 1880's and 1890's it used to be one of the biggest hop growing farms in the US. 

Along the sides of the roads surrounding that farm in late August/early September, you can pick all the wild hops that your heart desires.  They literally grow like weeds along the side of the road.

Aside from using improper terminology (vines instead of bines), its a neat little article: 
http://www.valleyrecord.com/news/176038051.html

Here's a painting of it:
http://www.meadowbrookfarmpreserve.org/graphics/photos/history_03_large.jpg

Very interesting read, thank you for sharing Steve! Seems like a great reason for a road trip.
Steve Carper
Green Dragon Brew Crew
Clubs: Oregon Brew Crew & Strange Brew
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