Author Topic: Test #2  (Read 2337 times)

Offline euge

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #15 on: March 26, 2016, 08:29:06 PM »
IIRC this strain likes to stall in the upper 1.020's so perhaps a bump in temp to finish it.

IIRC, 3724 is a variation of the Dupont yeast, which would mean it's sensitive to back pressure.  Try "open" fermentation, meaning no airlock, just foil over the fermenter opening.

LOL this is every fermentation in my brewery. No snapping of the bucket-lid for me! :D

I will try this yeast again for a Saison. Years since it's been used in the Brauerei euge.
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Offline brewinhard

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #16 on: March 26, 2016, 08:33:47 PM »
If using 3724, mash low as Hoosier suggested and I recommend adding a portion of cane sugar to replace your base malt with to further help attenuation.  This is ONLY if you are going to use straight 3724 and no extra 3711 as it is not needed when incorporating 3711.  The extra sugar will ensure a dry, crisp finish.  Also be sure to give it extra time on the first pitch.  Mine usually take about 6 wks to fully attenuate and that is with a lot of rousing to keep the yeast in suspension after they tend to stall around 1.020-1.030. 

Offline Phil_M

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #17 on: March 26, 2016, 10:04:16 PM »
No sugar was used.

Thanks to the new a slightly higher than expected boild off, coupled with the tight-but-not-wrist-breaking gap setting on my mill, I ended up grossly exceeding my target OG. What was supposed to be 1.062 ended up being 1.082.

As a result, I chilled it to 60o, and will pitch the yeast at that temp. I'll let it free rise to the ambient temp where it'll be fermented, mid upper 60's. After a day at that temp, I'll put the spurs to it, and ramp temps to 92o.

Due to the high initial gravity, I don't think this will end dry enough, therefore I plan on pitching Brett B. The question now is, when? What would the elevated temps do to the Brett? Thinking of letting it hit it's FG, sit for a week, then rack to secondary and pitch the brett. Then let it age for a while.
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #18 on: March 26, 2016, 10:12:28 PM »
I'd try to warm it up to 65 before pitching if you can, Phil. Honestly, this one is a perfect candidate for a packet of Belle Saison dry yeast (or 3711). It'll get the job done in a heart beat, like 1.002ish, assuming you mashed low and long enough. If you give the 3724 a good 4 day head start before adding, you'll be pretty happy. Good luck.
Jon H.

Offline Phil_M

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #19 on: March 27, 2016, 01:53:32 AM »
Yep, got it to 64 before pitching. I'd only chilled it that much because my shaken not stirred starter was still a couple hours away from high krausen.

I've got an airlock on the bucket, but the lid is just set on top. Hoping that tomorrow morning there's a nice krausen forming with no signs of air moving through the airlock.

Just ran some numbers, managed 80.3% mash efficiency. Light years better than my old BIAB setup.
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #20 on: March 27, 2016, 02:00:34 AM »
Yep, got it to 64 before pitching. I'd only chilled it that much because my shaken not stirred starter was still a couple hours away from high krausen.

I've got an airlock on the bucket, but the lid is just set on top. Hoping that tomorrow morning there's a nice krausen forming with no signs of air moving through the airlock.

Just ran some numbers, managed 80.3% mash efficiency. Light years better than my old BIAB setup.


I bet it comes out good !
Jon H.

Offline Phil_M

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #21 on: March 27, 2016, 02:05:24 AM »
I hope so! Definitely the biggest beer I've brewed, I'm praying it doesn't end up infected like my last saison.

The 3711 won't be delivered till Wednesday. Should I do a starter? Or just pitch it straight?
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #22 on: March 27, 2016, 02:09:32 AM »
I'd swell it up and pitch it straight. As long as you ramp up after a couple days, the 3724 should have eaten a fair amount of sugar by then, enough so that the single pack will tear through the rest pretty easily. Works pretty well for me.
Jon H.

Offline Phil_M

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #23 on: March 31, 2016, 08:44:32 PM »
Update:

I've followed Hoosier's advice so far, ended up pitching the 3711 yesterday. Beer is sitting at 72oF and still chugging away nicely. Probably ought to take a gravity reading, but I just haven't got around to it yet.
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline erockrph

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #24 on: April 02, 2016, 06:35:41 PM »
I haven't used it as a "relief pitcher", so I don't know if it works a little bit differently, but make sure you give the 3711 about a week longer than you think it needs. It tends to chew those last 3 gravity points rather slowly.
Eric B.

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Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #25 on: April 02, 2016, 06:51:44 PM »
I haven't used it as a "relief pitcher", so I don't know if it works a little bit differently, but make sure you give the 3711 about a week longer than you think it needs. It tends to chew those last 3 gravity points rather slowly.


+1. I still give the extra time with any saison. I like to give it a good three weeks in primary regardless with saison.


Jon H.

Offline Phil_M

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #26 on: April 03, 2016, 06:24:08 PM »
I was planning on letting it sit in primary for 4 weeks, then bottle.

I finally took a gravity reading the other day, 1.009. The sample was so yeasty I don't have much to say about how it tastes, other than that it was still pretty sweet. I'll give it another week then test and taste it again.

Speaking of bottling, should I start planning on having to re-yeast this beer when I do?
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline HoosierBrew

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Re: Test #2
« Reply #27 on: April 03, 2016, 06:43:18 PM »
I was planning on letting it sit in primary for 4 weeks, then bottle.

I finally took a gravity reading the other day, 1.009. The sample was so yeasty I don't have much to say about how it tastes, other than that it was still pretty sweet. I'll give it another week then test and taste it again.

Speaking of bottling, should I start planning on having to re-yeast this beer when I do?



You may have to give it another week or two to let the yeast eat the last few points. At that mash/time no reason it shouldn't be at or near 1.002. With the high OG there's no harm in re-yeasting. Probably a good idea.
Jon H.