Author Topic: Plating Yeast  (Read 896 times)

Offline Phil_M

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Plating Yeast
« on: February 15, 2016, 02:37:38 PM »
Finally bit the bullet and started yeast culturing. Poured a bunch of plates, and streaked some of them with yeast.

When I incubate the plates, what's the best place to do that? The fridge? Someplace warm? I've had them in the fridge for two days now, no visible growth. Moved some to a warmish (it's COLD in MD lately) spot in the house yesterday, no growth visible today. Just set some in on top of the hot water heater, if that doesn't work nothing will.

So, your thoughts: Did I somehow screw this up? Or are the yeast all too cold?
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Plating Yeast
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2016, 02:52:11 PM »
I proofed my plates and slants at room temp for two days. No growth so I stored in a zip lock in the fridge. When I streaked I did room temp two days, then pick my singles to inoculate slants. The slants incubate at room temp till the face of the media in the slant is mostly covered, then store in fridge up to 6 months.

Offline Phil_M

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Re: Plating Yeast
« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2016, 02:27:07 PM »
So I've finally got yeast showing up on my plates, the cold must have just drawn out the incubation process. I'm going to try and transfer some to slants tonight, if I get off work at a reasonable hour.
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline Todd H.

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Re: Plating Yeast
« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2016, 05:05:35 AM »
I'm sure you've got this figured out by now, given that it's a month and a half later, but assuming you're talking about cerevisiae, their optimal growth temp is 30 degrees celcius (whatever that is in fahrenheit), but as everyone who brews ales knows, they'll grow fine at room temp.  Store your plates in the fridge, wrapped in saran wrap or something to prevent dessication (and contamination).  Parafilm is optimal.

FWIW, my PhD was in yeast genetics.
Good luck!
Todd

Offline Phil_M

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Re: Plating Yeast
« Reply #4 on: April 07, 2016, 10:38:51 AM »
Yep, the ones in the fridge did eventually grow colonies. I'm not sure how long it took exactly, just remembered them one day and checked.

This was a trial run for me to see if my technique passes muster. Only 1 plate out of the 12 ended up with mold growing on it, so I'd say I did fine for a beginner. Plating the first strain I plan on actively banking this weekend.
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.